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Incident report at childcare - update


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#1 ALittleBitter

Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:36 PM

My 14 month old DD has bowed legs. At her 12 month appointment I asked her MCHN to check it out and she wasn't worried about it, and told me it is normal until the age of 3.
DD started at a new daycare centre 4 weeks ago, and since then the girls who work there have brought it up twice, just to make sure I was aware of the problem.

I picked her up tonight and was told there was an incident report to sign off on. The report was purely about DD's bowed legs and 'instep'  and they apparently need a doctor certificate to say she has been seen about it.

Does anyone else think that is strange? Her legs are quite bowed, and she has been walking for 5 months now and it isn't getting any better. But it doesn't seem to affect her walking, and her MCHN said there was nothing to worry about. Do you think I should I be trying to get her in to see somebody else about it?

Edited by ALittleBitter, 01 March 2013 - 01:10 PM.


#2 Lillifee

Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:41 PM

It is strange that you have to sign an I incident report about it, however if it were me I'd still get it checked out by a gp or peadiatrician.
It may likely be nothing, but you don't want to find out that the track that you are too late in doing something.



#3 Frockme

Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:45 PM

I wouldn't rely on the MCHN. I'd be going to a paed ASAP. Maybe there's nothing that can be done but I'd rather hear it from someone more qualified. I'd also have a load more questions about the future I think.  original.gif
I do think its a little strange for them to demand a drs cert over this, it may be policy these days. Who knows?

Edited by Malaya, 27 February 2013 - 05:47 PM.


#4 FloralArrangement

Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:46 PM

I would get a referral and get it checked. My ds kept falling when he started walking and walked/ran with a different gait. He now has physio and wears splints.  He also has been given a clinical diagnosis and has funding for treatment. If there is an issue getting on to the situation while a child is young can only be a benefit. The mchn is not a specialist. From my experience I would get it looked at.

#5 Awesome101

Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:51 PM

I had this too. My DS had bronchiolitis when he was 3 weeks old and was in hospital until he fully recovered but until he was about 3 had quite an obvious wheeze. We had him checked regularly just to keep an eye on it, had the Xrays etc etc but this was never enough for one of the ladies at daycare. She kept insisting there was something wrong and he needed to see a doctor... Umm he sees a specialist and a paed....

I was made to feel like such a terrible mother..

In your case though, I would see a specialist. More for your own peace of mind that you'd be getting an expert opinion.

#6 winkywonkeydonkey

Posted 27 February 2013 - 06:03 PM

I dont think its strange, they just have a duty of care and they are concerned so they want you to get it checked out properly.

Go see your GP and get the letter and if GP says its all fine no harm done.


#7 Nastyflea

Posted 27 February 2013 - 06:09 PM

I think it's preferable to people who don't care enough to make sure it's medically OK.


#8 ALittleBitter

Posted 27 February 2013 - 06:22 PM

Thanks for the replies. I will take her to see the GP tomorrow, hopefully there is nothing to worry about.



#9 L&E

Posted 27 February 2013 - 06:38 PM

Get it checked out OP, but my son has the opposite, his knocked knees are still fairly pronounced and he's just turned 3. My GP said the same as your MCHN, however I would still recommend having it checked to be certain there is nothing more at play.

#10 FloralArrangement

Posted 27 February 2013 - 06:56 PM

To add I would get a referral from a gp to a rehab paed to get a definitive answer it may be nothing or intervention may be required. I wouldn't just go to the gp so daycare stop bringing it up. This is based on my experience with my son.

#11 red_squirrel

Posted 27 February 2013 - 07:00 PM

Yes I think you should see a paed who will probably refer you on to physiotherapists and other medical specialists.
MCHNs aren't qualified to diagnose anything really and often don't refer on when they should do.

#12 Loz07

Posted 27 February 2013 - 07:16 PM

You could see a private podiatrist or physio for a review (just make sure they see kids). No referral necessary, so quicker than a paediatrician review. Plus, if there is an issue, a paed would send you to one anyway. If the physio etc thinks there is a problem, then you can still get checked by the paed for underlying issues etc.

The australian physio association has a find a physio service on their website, and you can search for paeds physios.
Podiatry associations are state based, not national, so google your relevant one.

#13 ALittleBitter

Posted 27 February 2013 - 07:18 PM

I will ask the GP for a referral if I need to. Of course I am not just going so that daycare stops asking about it, I want to make sure there are no underlying problems. I assumed that a MCHN would know what they were talking about with that kind of thing.

Thanks for that Loz07, I will look into it.

Edited by ALittleBitter, 27 February 2013 - 07:19 PM.


#14 TillyTake2

Posted 27 February 2013 - 07:30 PM

I wouldn't trust a MCHN with anything beyond very basic weighing & measuring. In my experience they are worse that useless & my son would have become extreamly sick as an infant if I had trusted the 3 different nurses I saw.

See a GP or better a paed.

#15 nasty roses

Posted 27 February 2013 - 09:12 PM

QUOTE (ALittleBitter @ 27/02/2013, 06:22 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for the replies. I will take her to see the GP tomorrow, hopefully there is nothing to worry about.

I agree that it's better to get her checked out by a GP rather than rely on the advice of the MCHN. But that said, she is probably right. I brought my DD's bow legs up with my GP at her 18 month appointment. She'd been walking about 4 months. He said the same thing - that they give them until 3 yrs to straighten before doing something about it. In the past little kids like her would have been put in painful callipers. Now, they realise that bow legs usually straighten out if left alone.

Its taken a while, but my DD's legs are now fine at 2.5.

#16 Bam1

Posted 27 February 2013 - 09:18 PM

I'm a plus one to roses99, same with my DD extremely bow legged got similar advice by 3 had perfectly straight legs

#17 IShallWearMidnight

Posted 27 February 2013 - 11:58 PM

Id get her checked out, but for my piece of mind, not to just make daycare happy

#18 ALittleBitter

Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:10 PM

Just thought I would come back and update.

We went to the GP today, he said it is quite pronounced and seems worse on one side so gave a referral for an x-ray. We will go back to see GP next week with the results and decide from there whether or not she needs to see a specialist. I feel awful brushing it aside until now sad.gif so thankyou for pushing me to see someone about it.

#19 Sweet like a lemon

Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:15 PM

QUOTE (ALittleBitter @ 01/03/2013, 02:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Just thought I would come back and update.

We went to the GP today, he said it is quite pronounced and seems worse on one side so gave a referral for an x-ray. We will go back to see GP next week with the results and decide from there whether or not she needs to see a specialist. I feel awful brushing it aside until now sad.gif so thankyou for pushing me to see someone about it.


Don't. Mothers deal with enough guilt anyway. You acted on the advise given to you, when others raised concerns you acted on that and now everything will progress forwards. You did good.

#20 noi'mnot

Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:15 PM

Good on you for getting it checked out, OP. It's hard to know when to trust professionals/instincts/internets/etc. Don't beat yourself up, the important thing is that it's now being addressed.

#21 HRH Countrymel

Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:21 PM

QUOTE (ForsakenTruth @ 01/03/2013, 02:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Don't. Mothers deal with enough guilt anyway. You acted on the advise given to you, when others raised concerns you acted on that and now everything will progress forwards. You did good.


And good on your childcare as well - looking out for your daughter and you.

#22 FloralArrangement

Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:27 PM

Don't feel bad because me pushing you to take it further was a direct reflection of my feelings in regards to my son. DS had only just started walking and was falling more than my first 3 children did. That there wasn't a problem and it turned out that there was a problem. No-one including medical peoiple were terribly worried at this stage. Which is now being dealt with. Think of it all as positive, carer's asking for verification, visit to GP, sorting out the issue.

I think of it as a positive that ds got a bad virus in which he lost his mobility. We went to children's ER and started on the road to where we are now with a clinical diagnosis, treatment, therapies and splints. It's what he needs and gives him a full and healthy life.

Edited by FloralArrangement, 01 March 2013 - 01:39 PM.


#23 Tigerdog

Posted 01 March 2013 - 02:16 PM

IME OP I find my own childcare centre to be totally over the top with stuff like this, maybe it's as a result of the mandatory reporting laws they need to adhere to (ie. as they are a point of contact with children who are in a good position to pick up on any health or other issues)?  

I've had to take my child to doctors to get clearance certificates for every little thing, one doctor even said to me 'who the hell do these people think they are, diagnosing things?  They aren't doctors!'  They even sent DS1 home one day for suspected worms - first of all, you can't really see worms during the day so the doctor couldn't even confirm anything.  Secondly, the treatment for worms is over-the-counter so there's no need to even go to a doctor to get confirmation and treatment, you just dose them up if you suspect it.  It turns out he hadn't wiped his bottom properly so was just itchy mad.gif

Go with what the MACH nurse says if you're happy with that, if they ask you for some sort of certificate, I'd query the need for this as they aren't the medical experts.




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