Jump to content

Studying with young kids


  • Please log in to reply
38 replies to this topic

#1 boysmom

Posted 25 February 2013 - 11:28 PM

Hi everyone,
I am thinking of studying masters in early childhood in Melbourne or Perth and have two young kids whom I would love to bring along.  I would like to know how difficult is it to juggle between uni and kids school for a young parent.  Are there any childcare services or after school care service at the uni to drop the kids when they have no school.  

Anyone here studying with young kids without family support, how does it work?  Please share your thoughts experiences or knowledge to help me.  Or do you know of anyone who has done this?

Thanks in advance!

#2 roses99

Posted 25 February 2013 - 11:39 PM

Would you consider distance education?

So many Masters courses are available online or via distance, which would make things a lot easier for you. In fact, some courses aren't even offered face-to-face anymore.

ETA: I work at a regional uni which has a fabulous long daycare centre across the road (connected to the uni) as well as occasional care facility (where you can drop your kids for a couple of hours to attend lectures and only pay for the hours you use. However, my understanding is that on-campus childcare is generally extremely hard to get and the waiting lists are long.

Which is another argument for distance ed  wink.gif

Edited by roses99, 25 February 2013 - 11:41 PM.


#3 Fire_fly

Posted 25 February 2013 - 11:43 PM

I can't help you with the childcare at the university situation. I am however studying a graduate diploma of psychological sciences without any family support. My Husband is FIFO so I can not rely on him for regular help and my family all live in other cities.

It is possible if you want it bad enough. It does take a lot of organisation and discipline as well as many late nights getting things done after the children go to bed.

My daughter is in childcare 2 days a week and during that time I attend classes, study groups, grocery shop and clean the house. My social life goes out the window for the 12 weeks I am attending classes.

All that being said. I think it's a great thing for children to see a good work ethic and discipline. I hope I have answered some of your questions and not just waffled on.

#4 roses99

Posted 25 February 2013 - 11:47 PM

Can I add one more thing? And this is coming from the perspective of someone who works in a Faculty of Education.

Unless you are really keen to study on-campus, I would choose a course rather than a university. Find a course that interests you and that will set you up for what you want to do with it down the track.

Also, keep in mind that Masters in Education courses are in a state of change in Australia as they move from one year courses (we still have those) to two year courses. Some faculties offer 18 month courses. Considering you're studying with kids, you might want to keep the course duration in mind when choosing.

#5 IShallWearMidnight

Posted 26 February 2013 - 12:01 PM

Im looking at studying my masters in second semester, hopefully part time with 2 days on campus. Ive tried distance, and I just didnt get time with the kids at home

#6 AnotherFeral

Posted 26 February 2013 - 12:14 PM

Online with daycare near home saves travel time and timetable clashes. You can study on whichever daycare days you can get. I don't think it would be doable without daycare/babysitting unless your kids go to bed early and sleep extraordinarily well.

#7 boysmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:11 PM

QUOTE (roses99 @ 25/02/2013, 11:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Would you consider distance education?

So many Masters courses are available online or via distance, which would make things a lot easier for you. In fact, some courses aren't even offered face-to-face anymore.

ETA: I work at a regional uni which has a fabulous long daycare centre across the road (connected to the uni) as well as occasional care facility (where you can drop your kids for a couple of hours to attend lectures and only pay for the hours you use. However, my understanding is that on-campus childcare is generally extremely hard to get and the waiting lists are long.

Which is another argument for distance ed  wink.gif


Thank you roses for your reply.  My kids are 6 yrs old and I believe they will be in school, my worry is what if the lectures happen to be outside their school hours.  I will be an international student and my H will not be joining me.  Any idea how many times a week will lectures generally be?

Thank you for your time!

#8 boysmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:16 PM

QUOTE (Ferdinand @ 25/02/2013, 11:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The only way I can juggle parenting and study is by studying via distance. Most unis have childcare on campus, but it can be very hard to get a spot and being a student doesn't guarantee you a spot at some centres.

My partner is extremely supportive, he saves up his annual leave and uses it up while I'm on prac so that our son still has a parent around for him. We have no-one else to lean on really.

I personally could not juggle lectures/tutes around my son's school hours as he has ASD and a lot of after school therapies to attend, it would just be impossible to only take classes that didn't clash. I'm sure others do mange it though.

It is a constant struggle to maintain balance between too much and too little time spent studying or parenting, but it is certainly doable.

Good luck with your decision and your studies.


Thank your Ferdinand for your reply.  I totally agree on the time spent on parenting and studying, I have 6 year old twin boys and it surely will be challenging thats why I am still hesitating to enroll. BTW amazing that you are studying with your son, does your live with you or far.  Thank you

#9 butterflydreaming

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:18 PM

I'm studying a bachelor degree part time, this semester I am doing two units on campus as I really need some me time out of the house and the chance to talk to other adults but I am also doing two units distance. I'm doing it with a three year old and a 12 week old and yes I think I was insane for thinking i could study in the early days of a new baby but was convinced i could do it as I did it with my first... I kind of forgot that it would be harder to find the time with two.

I think to study with children you have to be super organised and accept the fact that study is your 'me' time because you won't have time to do much else depending on the age and number of children you have. If you can get lectures recorded to listen too on an mp3 player i suggest you listen to them when ever you can, in the car, while doing housework or in my case while pacing the house with a screaming baby in my arms. Listening to them over and over again helps more of it stick in my mind.

#10 Wolffmumma

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:18 PM

I'm studying online (not the same field) because moving wasn't an option for me.  You could probably access after school care depending on what times lectures ran.
I would email the universities you are interested in studying with I'm sure they can give you an idea of what schedule the classes have run on for the last couple of years, it's probably not a guarantee that it how they will be but it should give you an idea.

#11 akkiandmalli

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:20 PM

I studied master of teachin g in 2008-09. Full time is 5 days a week at melb uni. 3 days of 9-4 classes and 2 days of peac. It's full on..  I had a newborn and a 2 year old . It was by far the hardest thing I have ever done. My children were in care from 8-5 every day. We survived . My DH was Amazing a huge support on weekends when I had to study ( lots of assignments and readings) Good luck pm me if you need further info)

#12 boysmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:23 PM

QUOTE (Fire_fly @ 25/02/2013, 11:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I can't help you with the childcare at the university situation. I am however studying a graduate diploma of psychological sciences without any family support. My Husband is FIFO so I can not rely on him for regular help and my family all live in other cities.

It is possible if you want it bad enough. It does take a lot of organisation and discipline as well as many late nights getting things done after the children go to bed.

My daughter is in childcare 2 days a week and during that time I attend classes, study groups, grocery shop and clean the house. My social life goes out the window for the 12 weeks I am attending classes.

All that being said. I think it's a great thing for children to see a good work ethic and discipline. I hope I have answered some of your questions and not just waffled on.


Thank you fire fly for the insight, yes I want it bad and have set routines for my kids from young in such a way they do their homework while I am working on the comp or busy, they also go to bed by 7:30pm and wake up only at 7am.  I'll be an international student and my biggest concern is their school and lecture hour clashes.  I will not know anyone there so social life will be confined to fb lol:

I love the fact that you think its good for children to see work ethics and discipline:)

Thank you again

#13 boysmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:30 PM

QUOTE (roses99 @ 25/02/2013, 11:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Can I add one more thing? And this is coming from the perspective of someone who works in a Faculty of Education.

Unless you are really keen to study on-campus, I would choose a course rather than a university. Find a course that interests you and that will set you up for what you want to do with it down the track.

Also, keep in mind that Masters in Education courses are in a state of change in Australia as they move from one year courses (we still have those) to two year courses. Some faculties offer 18 month courses. Considering you're studying with kids, you might want to keep the course duration in mind when choosing.


Great advice, thank you!  I have a bachelor of early childhood and have worked as preschool teacher for many years, I am looking for a masters program that will enable to me be registered as a teacher in Victoria thats why I am not very keen on online programs.  There are only two programs I can consider either masters in early childhood/pre-primary or special education, I love both.  If you have time I will greatly appreciate some insight into which uni in victoria will suit me.  I am fine with any duration upto 2 years.  I do believe I will get advance standing for some units.

#14 boysmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:32 PM

QUOTE (trishalishous @ 26/02/2013, 12:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Im looking at studying my masters in second semester, hopefully part time with 2 days on campus. Ive tried distance, and I just didnt get time with the kids at home


I understand about the distance learning with kids, thank you!

#15 boysmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:35 PM

QUOTE (aratiaw @ 26/02/2013, 12:14 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Online with daycare near home saves travel time and timetable clashes. You can study on whichever daycare days you can get. I don't think it would be doable without daycare/babysitting unless your kids go to bed early and sleep extraordinarily well.


To be honest I don't mind online with some face to face but I wonder if the degree will be accredited as a good teaching qualification in Victoria???

QUOTE (twinsmom @ 28/02/2013, 01:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
To be honest I don't mind online with some face to face but I wonder if the degree will be accredited as a good teaching qualification in Victoria???


Thank you too for your input:)

#16 boysmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:41 PM

QUOTE (akkiandmalli @ 28/02/2013, 01:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I studied master of teachin g in 2008-09. Full time is 5 days a week at melb uni. 3 days of 9-4 classes and 2 days of peac. It's full on..  I had a newborn and a 2 year old . It was by far the hardest thing I have ever done. My children were in care from 8-5 every day. We survived . My DH was Amazing a huge support on weekends when I had to study ( lots of assignments and readings) Good luck pm me if you need further info)


Wow! you studies with a new born? amazing:)

Thats a real full time program.  Thats exactly my concern, heard the primary school hours are 8:30 - 3:30 in Victoria and if classes run beyond that hour then I will have problem.  Its an excellent idea to contact the uni for past years schedule, will do that.  My husband won't be with me but my kids are pretty independent and are good at entertaining themselves within limits, thats why waited till they turn 6.  

Thank you for your offer, will pm you

#17 Chaos in stereo

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:44 PM

.

Edited by Chaos in stereo, 26 August 2013 - 04:51 PM.


#18 boysmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:57 PM

QUOTE (Chaos in stereo @ 28/02/2013, 01:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi OP,

I did 2 subjects per semester last year (face to face) and had both kids in 2 days per week daycare (but short days because  DS' preschool finished at 3). The classes shift in the mid year break, there is no way you can line up your childcare to cover all your classes all year. Unless you are really lucky! I also did not line up childcare on campus - very in demand and I think staff get first dibs. I did find a very good centre quite close to uni though for DD.

I used a nanny/babysitter who lived locally and had her own little one (who she brought to our house) to mind my kids for an hour or two when I couldn't cover my contact hours with formal childcare. It is expensive but I kept it to a minimum.

I did all my study at night and on the weekend. It was a loooooong year but very rewarding.  original.gif

Good luck!

Thank you for your input! I am happy to hear that it was a rewarding year for you:) I am not an Australian and will be alone with 2 kids thats a little scary for me.  May I ask how much does nanny cost in general and how easy is it to find one? Do the uni allow having kids in the lecture room if they are quiet and and self entertaining?  

ETA clarification



#19 boysmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:58 PM

Pardon me everyone for the way I quote, I am new to the forum and learning my way around:)

#20 kpingitquiet

Posted 28 February 2013 - 04:22 PM

I'm doing a BASoc at 2 units per quarter (no breaks) so kinda full-time, kinda not. I just started this term so no real advice/experience. The only way on God's green earth that it works for me at all is that it's all online study with Macquarie.

I study before our 2yo wakes up. Get some reading done, when possible, while she plays after breakfast, then a bit more during nap and when husband takes her out to play before dinner, and still a bit more after she's in bed if I need to. It hasn't been too rough. When subjects get more advanced, we may put her in daycare 1 or 2 days per week so I can have silent study days. I strongly recommend finding a distance/online program if you can manage it. I think it's a LOT friendlier for parents, working or SAH.

#21 boysmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 07:56 PM

Can anyone tell me if AITSL or any other assessing body recognize and accredit online degree for teacher registration.  I don't really know how it works.  

Thank you

#22 Chaos in stereo

Posted 28 February 2013 - 07:57 PM

.

Edited by Chaos in stereo, 26 August 2013 - 04:53 PM.


#23 boysmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 07:57 PM

QUOTE (kpingitquiet @ 28/02/2013, 04:22 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm doing a BASoc at 2 units per quarter (no breaks) so kinda full-time, kinda not. I just started this term so no real advice/experience. The only way on God's green earth that it works for me at all is that it's all online study with Macquarie.

I study before our 2yo wakes up. Get some reading done, when possible, while she plays after breakfast, then a bit more during nap and when husband takes her out to play before dinner, and still a bit more after she's in bed if I need to. It hasn't been too rough. When subjects get more advanced, we may put her in daycare 1 or 2 days per week so I can have silent study days. I strongly recommend finding a distance/online program if you can manage it. I think it's a LOT friendlier for parents, working or SAH.


Thank you! am now looking into finding out whether the online degree is recognized for registration or not.

Edited by twinsmom, 28 February 2013 - 07:58 PM.


#24 snowhite

Posted 28 February 2013 - 08:28 PM

Anything is possible.

I had 3 children while studying Medicine - involved a LOT of juggling but it all worked out just fine.

My best tip is to consider having an AuPair - that is how I made it work. In that arrangement, you have someone live with you, you provide room and board and weekly allowance of approx 200AUD. In return, she could drop the kids to school, pick them up when needed, help out with homework and even get dinner going before you get home. AuPair can also help with kids' washing, keeping their rooms tidy, help out with some basic housework. There are loads of AuPair agencies and websites that you can have a look at. If you would like more info just PM me.

Next best option would be before and after school care - most schools have this available and places ate not too difficult to come by. Just ask the school.

I hope it all works out for you.

#25 kpingitquiet

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:04 PM

I know Curtin University offers Bachelor of Education for either primary or early childhood ed online through Open Universities. You could email the program contact and find out about registration but I would imagine it's a fully accredited program.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

Decluttering before Christmas: tips for managing the toy influx

Deciding how many toys you want to keep and enforcing a limit can help manage the sheer volume of playthings.

86-year-old taught himself to knit, now makes caps for premature babies

'Anything is possible if you put your mind to it' might just be the motto of 86 year-old retiree, Ed Moseley who despite his age and abilities has been gifting handmade knitted caps to premature babies.

Want healthy kids? Let them play in the mud, feed them allergenic foods - and get a dog

If you read about children's health, you've heard a lot of this before.

Photo captures mum's shock at delivery room surprise

Life can be full of surprises, but for this couple a surprise came in a very unexpected way.

Baby's family in law suit over RAAF base chemicals

A 10-month-old baby has been exposed to significant levels of toxic chemicals around a RAAF base near Newcastle, say his parents.

Childcare worker investigated after threatening toddler's mother

An early childhood teacher has been censured for serious misconduct after she threatened the mother of a young child.

Scottish baby names

Scotland, the wind and water-hewn land of the loch, the kilt and the heather. Bedecked in castles great and small, there are many Australians with Scottish heritage who could look to that fair country for baby name inspiration.

Do we need more parking spaces for parents?

The Give Me Space campaign is collecting stories from mums who have had difficult experiences while trying to find safe parking.

Gender neutral parenting: what it's really like

If you want to take a leaf out of Clare's book in gender neutral parenting, her advice is simple: "Follow the children's lead, and you can't go wrong."

The vital question no parent wants to think about

Since becoming a mother I sometimes wonder what would happen to my babies if their dad and I both died.

6 parents to stop judging right now

It's worth looking a little more closely at some common parenting missteps. Could it be these mums and dads are really just like you and me?

Ryan Reynolds shares delivery room tips for expectant dads

If your partner is heading to the delivery room any time soon, you've got to see Ryan Reynolds' video on dealing with the intricacies of the delivery room.

The trials and tribulations of teenage mums, 10 years later

Having her first baby at 16 was a shock for Simone Miller, but it's not something she regrets.

Grandma falls head over heels for baby - literally

Usually Valerie Sharp's plan to put her granddaughter into her cot works just fine, but when things go wrong it is hilarious.

My toddler wants all my attention all of the time - help!

This is a stage, and you and she will move through it. I can (almost) promise it.

Cotton On KIDS' cute new baby prewalker shoes

Oh watch out folks, Cotton On KIDS' baby range has just become even cuter with the release of its first ever prewalker shoe collection.

Why I love the superhero phase

My twins are heading towards three and have officially entered the superhero phase. It happened almost overnight.

I'm caught in a 'mumpetition' with my friend and I'm losing it

My best friend and I had children within a year of each other. She thinks her child is God's gift to the world.

A year of motherhood: my survival story

Motherhood burns you down, but it rebuilds you too.

Five traps to be aware of when reading IVF clinic websites

Clinics provide IVF success rates in often confusing ways because there is no agreed format on how this information should be presented.

 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Articles

Advertisement
 
 
 

What's hot on EB

What pregnancy is really like: mums share their honest opinions

We asked real women what surprised them during their pregnancy. They've shared their experiences in the hope of preparing the rest of us better for the ride

The truth about big-headed babies

Research suggests that big headed babies become more intelligent than their smaller peers. One mum shares the positives and negatives of having a big headed baby.

How to encourage your baby's gross motor development skills

There are some everyday things that parents can do to improve gross motor skills and coordination.

'My baby's extra thumb saved her life'

A mum whose daughter was born with an extra thumb says that the extra digit saved her life.

He gave her his liver, she gave him her heart

Heather Krueger and Chris Dempsey's origin story began in a darker place than most: with stage 4 liver cancer.

Toilet training from birth? It is possible

This method, called elimination communication (EC or assisted infant toilet training), is becoming increasingly popular in the West.

Watch hilarious montage of strangest pregnancy questions on Yahoo Answers

Some of the strangest questions about pregnancy - and some of the most bizarre spelling - have made for a hilarious video.

How to reduce your chances of perineal tearing in birth

The use of heat packs, along with other aspects of clinical care, can reduce your risk of tearing in birth.

 

Baby Names

Unusual Celeb Baby Names

Click through the gallery to read the details and see some of the most memorable monikers in show biz families.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.