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Just what is "gifted and talented"?


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#1 liveworkplay

Posted 25 February 2013 - 04:58 PM

I hear this term so much and have always been.confused at just where "bright" stops and "G&T" starts. DD1 is in year 3. Due to cut off dates, she is the eldest in her year group and always done we'll. But I kind of expect her too being appreciate eldest. She was doing some maths extension last year at school.with a group.of about 10 of her classmates.Today we get notification that she has been chosen for a G&T program run through our states catholic education office. It's an online based program with students from catholic schools.around the state including a couple of meet ups with local participants.

Of course we are proud of her for being chosen but it has got me thinking. Is she in the "bright" or "gifted" category? What is the difference? and should we have been doing anything else to nurture her if she is indeed gifted?
Any thoughts would be appreciated

(edited because im on my phn....)

Edited by liveworkplay, 25 February 2013 - 05:03 PM.


#2 brazen

Posted 25 February 2013 - 05:13 PM

in education it's according to the theory of Gagne for the most part

#3 BadCat

Posted 25 February 2013 - 05:13 PM

I find that schools use bright and G&T interchangeably so that they can fill their "G&T" groups.

#4 capper

Posted 25 February 2013 - 05:15 PM

Have a look here.  It really depends on who you talk to.  There are many gifted and talented program's full of bright, hard working kids.  

http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/identification.htm

For us, having a highly gifted child means he is years ahead, with little or no effort.  Poor school fit, even with a grade skip and extension and enrichment in most subjects, the ability to pick things up without you even knowing where info comes from.  Although, his motivation is often lacking, due to not being suitably engaged.

#5 Kay1

Posted 25 February 2013 - 05:15 PM

IME its used to mean "kids who need extension", not actual, tested giftedness.

#6 baddmammajamma

Posted 25 February 2013 - 05:16 PM

I just bumped a thread from last year on the very same topic - mainly because the dialogue reached 11 pages, and some of us wrote out thoughtful (or somewhat thoughtful) responses in it.

Sorry to have two threads in parallel!

http://www.essentialbaby.com.au/forums/ind...howtopic=979615

#7 barrington

Posted 25 February 2013 - 05:24 PM

I'll preface by saying that at this point, none of my children have been tested. But I believe that my DS is gifted and his younger sister, bright.  He simply picks up and understands new concepts very, very quickly.  With DD1, it usually takes a couple of times for her to 'get' things, although she is easily one of the top students in her class.

Both are in extension programs at their respective schools, and both deserve to be there.




#8 kpingitquiet

Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:00 PM

For me, it meant my mom and preschool teachers saw lots of signs (self-taught early reading, advanced language, quick grasp of new concepts, boring easily, correcting authority) and had me assessed (IQ + interviews) before starting FYOS. I was in the G&T program from Day 1. Other kids are recognized earlier or later and their parents or schools may or may not want formal testing.

#9 Nasty Jerk

Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:06 PM

So what's the difference between being 'gifted' or being 'talented,'?

#10 Acidulous Osprey

Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:14 PM

Gifted is an IQ over 120.

Talented is a child who excels at music or art or drama.

Not all gifted kids are talented and not all talented kids are gifted.  Some domains such as maths or creative writing are considered talents.

#11 Fifi

Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:28 PM

Hi liveworkplay - which state are you in? Would love to look into something similar for my kids. Gifted kids in country nsw - opportunities are few and far between - this sounds great!!

#12 Canberra Chick

Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:51 PM

QUOTE (Kay1 @ 25/02/2013, 06:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
IME its used to mean "kids who need extension", not actual, tested giftedness.


Yes. DS is very bright but nobody has suggested testing him. However, he gets extension activities at school and was invited by his school to attend extension clubs run by the local G&T group. Is he gifted? No idea. So long as he is enjoying life, including school and not feeling bored we are happy.

#13 QuisbySchmoo

Posted 25 February 2013 - 08:20 PM

True G & T individuals have both static or crystallised intelligence combined with fluid intelligence happening.

Static intelligence is the ability to listen closely, recall, verbalise and communicate clearly information.  A lot of people have this ability (and I think many parents recognise this in their children)

Fluid intelligence is the ability to take that information and apply it in a deductive manner and come up with new scenarios, new reasonings, new ways of seeing the old so to speak.  Not many people have this ability.

The two combined (coupled with spatial intelligence - the whole visual thing going on which is a different again but added to the mix just makes it all the more powerful) - when all of that is combined then you have what I think is a true intelligently gifted person.

I honestly don't think that many people have the whole gambit going on - the static combined with the fluid combined with the spatial.

The more important thing however is to acknowledge that there are multiple intelligences at play, set aside our traditional focus on formuliac stuff and encourage more reasoning and inferential abilities.





#14 LynnyP

Posted 25 February 2013 - 08:27 PM

What do you think the advantages are of a gifted and talented stream?  My daughter goes to a small school, one class of boys and one of girls just about all through primary.  Specialist teachers for things like music, art, languages, IT, science etc.  There are around 16 in each class.  They practice differentiated learning within the class.  Yet I have had a couple of people say they prefer the larger primary schools that have G&T "streams".  In the secondary school they stream the classes (different stream for English than Maths say).  To me, in primary, it seems to be better to stay with your social group but there are lots of different opinions.

#15 liveworkplay

Posted 25 February 2013 - 08:33 PM

Fifi, I'm in Tas.

CC, that's basically how we feel. As long as she is happy, learning new stuff and not bored, we are happy. Being my eldest and not having any friends with older children, I do find that I do not know really what "normal" is. In speaking (socially) with one of her old teachers (not at the school now), she was saying how she is pretty good at gauging the spectrum of "normal" now due to seeing/teaching so many kids. She taught my DD in grade 1 and thinks that her art (which she has always loved and is good at) was on the exceptional end and certainly not normal. She is also a natural at maths and quite sporty as well.  

We almost had her assessed for early entry for school as she missed the cut off by less then 2 weeks but in the end let it be. Luckily our fear of her being bored never eventuated.

QUOTE
What do you think the advantages are of a gifted and talented stream?


LynnyP, our school works like yours (but with larger class sizes but "team teaching" across the grade. The only advantage of the extension groups and this program that I can see, is it a bit of fun outside of the curriculum that stretches them a bit. It's not about streaming or accelerated learning, more a fun addition to stretch the mind with like minded kids.


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Edited by liveworkplay, 25 February 2013 - 08:36 PM.





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