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How long for landlord to fix door lock?


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#1 KylieferalMin0gue

Posted 22 February 2013 - 04:29 PM

I have what I think is a slack landlord.  We have been here for 6 years, and the very few times I have had to call her for maintenance issues she has taking ages (sometimes months and after many phone calls) to rectify the problems)
Anyway 2 days ago the lock on the back screen door stopped working.  The little latch thing just seized up and refused to move to lock the door, so the door will not lock.  I informed the landlord straight away, and she said that she would get someone out when she could.  I mentioned that I thought that this was a security issue, hence needing it fixed asap.  (The back door is a glass sliding door, and would not be hard to force open)
How long do you think is reasonable to fix this problem?

#2 ~Supernova~

Posted 22 February 2013 - 04:34 PM

A screen door is not an emergency, so probably a week or two max. Stick a piece of dowel in the door in the meantime if you are concerned

#3 JRA

Posted 22 February 2013 - 04:45 PM

I am also confused why it is a security issue.  The glass door sound as though it is the real locking door. A screen door with a simple latch is not a security door (the way you describe it).





#4 Illiterati

Posted 22 February 2013 - 04:58 PM

Screen door? Within a week or two?


#5 ~Supernova~

Posted 22 February 2013 - 05:03 PM

QUOTE (SlowEmotionReplay @ 22/02/2013, 05:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Screen door? Within a week or two?


I'm just going by how long it took to get ours fixed (and ours locked, it just seized up and was very difficult to open). For non emergency repairs, we have waited a maximum of two weeks.

#6 ~J_F~

Posted 22 February 2013 - 05:13 PM

A couple of weeks. But they may not have to fix it as technically the screen still serves it purpose to screen the bugs, it just doesnt lock. And screen doors are not something you have to have on a rental.

#7 madmax1

Posted 22 February 2013 - 05:17 PM

For the same thing I waited for 3 days. I told them my insurance was invalid without a secure door (~which  it is) We also do not have keys to lock the glass doors only the screen doors so for us it was a security issue. The locksmith said the lock was so old he was amazed it had lasted so long as it was.

#8 #YKG

Posted 22 February 2013 - 05:19 PM

TBH I'd just google how to fix that myself & if it didn't work I'd organize something myself, it's not an urgent repair like a hot water system so something small like that I'd do myself.

#9 Feral*Spikey*

Posted 22 February 2013 - 05:47 PM

Locks on doors and windows are a security issue. If the glass door doesn't key locked, then it is an urgent repair and should be done within 24-48 hours.

I'd be phoning a locksmith so you know how much its going to cost. If your LL is that slack, I'd probably just do it (organise the locksmith) myself, and send them the bill.

Do you have a property manager, or are you directly letting from the LL?

#10 ~Supernova~

Posted 22 February 2013 - 05:53 PM

QUOTE (*Spikey* @ 22/02/2013, 06:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Locks on doors and windows are a security issue. If the glass door doesn't key locked, then it is an urgent repair and should be done within 24-48 hours.

I'd be phoning a locksmith so you know how much its going to cost. If your LL is that slack, I'd probably just do it (organise the locksmith) myself, and send them the bill.

Do you have a property manager, or are you directly letting from the LL?


Her door locks, it's her security screen that doesn't. Considering it isn't a standard rental item, I don't see how it is urgent :/

#11 Mischief Managed

Posted 22 February 2013 - 05:57 PM

Hopefully it's done asap and your contents insurance isn't affected.

We had a back door without a lock on a property when we moved in (first house out of home); called the agent and they said they'd get someone to look in on it; we couldn't get contents insurance without it.

Came home from work the next day and our house had been robbed.  The only things that hadn't been taken were our bed our couch and the fish tank.

#12 Smoo

Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:00 PM

this is for nsw but other states should have similar

QUOTE
Urgent repairs
The law distinguishes between urgent (emergency) repairs and those which are not so urgent. Urgent repairs are:

a burst water service or a serious water service leak
a blocked or broken toilet
a serious roof leak
a gas leak
a dangerous electrical fault
flooding or serious flood damage
serious storm or fire damage
a failure or breakdown of the gas, electricity or water supply to the premises
a failure or breakdown of the hot water service
a failure or breakdown of the stove or oven
a failure or breakdown of a heater or air-conditioner
a fault or damage which makes the premises unsafe or insecure.
If urgent repairs are needed you should notify the landlord or agent right away. The landlord or agent must arrange for the repairs to be done as soon as possible. If you cannot reach them, check your tenancy agreement for the details of a nominated tradesperson to contact.

If urgent repairs are not done within a reasonable time you may be able to arrange for the work to be done and be reimbursed by the landlord (but only up to $1000). However, you must be able to show that:

the need for the urgent repair was not your fault
you contacted the landlord or agent about the problem or made a reasonable attempt to do so
you gave the landlord or agent a reasonable opportunity to get the repairs done
the repairs were carried out by a licensed tradesperson (if appropriate).
You must give the landlord written notice setting out the details of the repair and copies of all receipts. The landlord is required to pay you back within 14 days of receiving your notice. If they do not you can apply to the Consumer, Trader and Tenancy Tribunal for an order.

http://www.fairtrading.nsw.gov.au/Tenants_...pairs_done.html

I just wish they'd define a 'reasonable length of time'

#13 JRA

Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:46 PM

The OP didn't say it was a security screen, the way it was described as more like a fly wire door.



#14 Feral*Spikey*

Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:49 PM

QUOTE (Mareek @ 22/02/2013, 05:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Her door locks, it's her security screen that doesn't. Considering it isn't a standard rental item, I don't see how it is urgent :/


Where did she say that exactly?

I see a comment about a screen door with a lock, and a second comment about a sliding door that wouldn't be hard to open. Its silent as to whether or not it has a lock.

Which is why I prefaced my statement with a 'if your glass door doesn't key locked'....

#15 Feral*Spikey*

Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:51 PM

QUOTE (JRA @ 22/02/2013, 06:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The OP didn't say it was a security screen, the way it was described as more like a fly wire door.


She didn't say that either. But, it does have a lock. Or did. So it offers some form of security. A fly wire door (that isn't also a security one) doesn't usually come with a lock, does it? A latch yes, a lock, no...

#16 Feral*Spikey*

Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:52 PM

QUOTE (Mischief Managed @ 22/02/2013, 05:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hopefully it's done asap and your contents insurance isn't affected.

We had a back door without a lock on a property when we moved in (first house out of home); called the agent and they said they'd get someone to look in on it; we couldn't get contents insurance without it.

Came home from work the next day and our house had been robbed.  The only things that hadn't been taken were our bed our couch and the fish tank.


Oh dear, they certainly 'took care of it'. sad.gif

#17 JRA

Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:53 PM

QUOTE
The little latch thing just seized up and refused to move to lock the door, so the door will not lock


You're right spikey, I must admit I read from this bit that it wasn't a key type lockable door, but more of a latch type thing. But that was just my imagination from what was written

#18 Feral*Spikey*

Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:54 PM

I've had such a bad day, I'm not game to assume anything at this point. It might bite me. wink.gif

#19 JRA

Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:55 PM

That was my day yesterday, spikey

#20 Feral*Spikey*

Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:58 PM

I should also add, that you could very well be right - she mentioned a latch but that it locks. So that's why I took the each way bet. laugh.gif

#21 unicorn

Posted 22 February 2013 - 07:10 PM

QUOTE (JRA @ 22/02/2013, 07:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The OP didn't say it was a security screen, the way it was described as more like a fly wire door.

My parents have those crim safe doors and they have a latch that you just flip from 1 o'clock to 11 o'clock. This latch also moves when you use the key to lock it from either inside the doors or outside. Once locked with the key though, the latch won't unlock without the key.
I have had standard security screens that work the same way and if they are the same as the OPs then yes OP I think it is a security issue and should be fixed within 24 hours.

Have you tried spraying some WD40 into the mechanism or seen if there is something jamming it?

Edited by Flibbertigibberty, 22 February 2013 - 07:10 PM.


#22 ~Supernova~

Posted 22 February 2013 - 07:11 PM

QUOTE (*Spikey* @ 22/02/2013, 07:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Where did she say that exactly?

I see a comment about a screen door with a lock, and a second comment about a sliding door that wouldn't be hard to open. Its silent as to whether or not it has a lock.

Which is why I prefaced my statement with a 'if your glass door doesn't key locked'....


If you read the op, it specifically says "screen door". She is then concerned because her "still lockable" glass door would be easy to break into (as you can lift, slide, and pop many of them off).

ETA: We have a screen door which can either be "latched" (with plastic surrounding the latch) or dead locked.

Edited by Mareek, 22 February 2013 - 07:13 PM.


#23 kadoodle

Posted 22 February 2013 - 07:17 PM

Graphite will lubricate the lock.  Get a greylead pencil, crush up some of the lead and blow it into the lock.  If it's just a little stuck, it'll loosen.  If it's totally caput, call a locksmith and send them the bill, otherwise if your place gets turned over your insurance will be worthless.

#24 Ireckon

Posted 22 February 2013 - 07:20 PM

Our screen sliding door lock broke about 12 months into our tenancy. Honestly, I believe it broke from the way my kids close the door. I went to bunnings and got a replacement for about $80 and installed it myself, it was very easy. I let the Re know and gave them a copy of the new key. I did not expect it to be paid for, because it broke due to the constant slamming nature of my children closing the door ( we won't go into my frazzled nerves and repeated "close it gently"'s)

I realise that security is a LL responsibility. We are also Ll's ourselves. We have a great relationship with our tenants though, and if this happened to them, they would either a) replace it and we would reimburse them or b) they would own the repair as a result of their constant usage and wear the costs themselves.

I am in no way saying that you have broken the lock, you have clearly stated it seized up and it is old. 6 years of living in the same place does allow for user wear and tear. Just giving a different point of view of how it happened for us and how our tenants would handle the situation.

#25 Bob-the-skull

Posted 22 February 2013 - 07:41 PM

QUOTE (Ireckon @ 22/02/2013, 07:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Our screen sliding door lock broke about 12 months into our tenancy. Honestly, I believe it broke from the way my kids close the door. I went to bunnings and got a replacement for about $80 and installed it myself, it was very easy. I let the Re know and gave them a copy of the new key. I did not expect it to be paid for, because it broke due to the constant slamming nature of my children closing the door ( we won't go into my frazzled nerves and repeated "close it gently"'s)

I realise that security is a LL responsibility. We are also Ll's ourselves. We have a great relationship with our tenants though, and if this happened to them, they would either a) replace it and we would reimburse them or b) they would own the repair as a result of their constant usage and wear the costs themselves.

I am in no way saying that you have broken the lock, you have clearly stated it seized up and it is old. 6 years of living in the same place does allow for user wear and tear. Just giving a different point of view of how it happened for us and how our tenants would handle the situation.


wear and tear on the property is not the tenants responsibility to fix regardless how long they have been there for. damage caused by neglect,abuse or accident is but not general wear and tear




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