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Precocious/early puberty?


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#1 JaneDoe2010

Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:01 PM

Has anyone here had a DD go through puberty early? My 8 year old is and I'm so sad for her. sad.gif She's been wearing deodorant for a year now, has small breasts developing, a couple of instances of vaginal discharge and now hair starting under her arms. Paed also thinks rapid weight and height increase in last year could be due to puberty too.

We are seeing all the relevant professionals, but I'd love to hear of the experience of others. Did they try to halt it? Why/why not? How? How long from early symptoms until period? Did she still grow in height?

Thanks.

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#2 Duechristmasday

Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:17 PM

My DD is now 10 and started developing very early too.  Has small boobs, so we finally bought her some bonds trainer bra's last week.  Her breasts started developing at 8 years.  I also am finding that she is putting on weight, irritable and has also grown in height significantly.  She has not really had any other symptoms.

I would google early menstruation in girls and see what sort of answers you will get. It is not uncommon for girls to start their periods in grade 5 now.  None of my daughters friends seem to be developing as quickly.

#3 kpingitquiet

Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:36 PM

Not experience with my child but experience for myself. I was wearing a much-needed bra in 3rd grade (8yo), had bad acne from 7yo onward, got my period shortly before my 11th birthday, stopped growing by 13 with stressful stretches of growth and gain before then taking me from the tallest in the class to one of the shortest in only a couple years time. Was a DD cup by 12/13, too.

Not sure if I can offer any advice, but it's very normal in my family, but even then I was still a bit of a genius at the whole thing wink.gif (ie, a few months earlier than even my earliest aunt/cousin., a few cupsizes bigger, blahblah).

#4 kpingitquiet

Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:44 PM

Btw, to the best of my knowledge, 8yo is just beyond the reach of precocious puberty as far as breast development is concerned. It is not that unusual for 8yos to start developing breasts. Pubic hair before 9yo is just barely outside the edge of the normal range but I don't think it's so early that you should consider halting it with hormone treatment, unless there are underlying mental/emotional impairment issues? Don't be sad. Start teaching her to celebrate the changes and manage any discomfort as best she can.

#5 Beancat

Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:46 PM

Oh your poor baby girl sad.gif

I don't know the answers but have seen this topic posted a few times on EB.  My only two suggestions wold be to have a talk to her about periods so if it does arrive soon she doesnt get a terrible fright.  Maybe pack some pads etc in her school bag and have a talk to her teacher about where she is at.

Also (you may have done so already), buy her some of those Bonds bra tops/crop singlets to wear under t-shirts.  It just provides an extra layer of protection from prying eyes from others (sinister or not) and may give her a little more self confidence.

#6 KT1978

Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:49 PM

Happened to me, had a c cup by the time I was 12, periods at 11.

My Mum didn't really cope, I remember feeling painfully embaressed about it, but I think my Mum being embaressed and encouraging me to stop wearing leotards to gymnastics, and feeling so uncomfortable about it rubbed off.  She also talked to Dad/other relatives about it like I had contracted leprosy or something! Other kids were pretty awful too by commenting on it and I also got by the age of 12/13 very obvious male attention from adults which was yucky (I was very tall, skinny long legs and big boobs - the kind of body I'd love now but hated at the time and was mistaken for a 16/17 year old).

DD is developing early also, probably made worse by the fact she has always been a bit chubby which makes boobs bigger.  I started shaving under her arms last year.  She has crop tops and I've just got her wearing deoderant for sport and hot days.  I'm thinking recently its time to make sure she has access to pads and things in her school bag just in case.

I've been lucky with her though, that I haven't made it a big deal, I've emphasised that all her friends will get this, if not in year 5 it will be year 6 and 7.  She doesn't seem worried about it.  I've
tried to make sure her clothes fit well and don't emphasis her chest and that kind of thing too.  This was going to happen to her at some stage, so I'm more trying to make sure its not an emotionally hard thing - physically its only really a year or two early.  Luckily she is not the only one in her class - I was the only one in my class which made it worse - so its not a big deal in that way.




#7 Sentient Puddle

Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:53 PM

There was a topic very recently - a member's child got her period early and someone posted a link to a great bike pant that  guarantee no leakage and look just like bike pants.  I wonder if anyone remembers the name??? Might be helpful if your daughter starts menstruating soon as well.

#8 JaneDoe2010

Posted 18 February 2013 - 01:02 PM

QUOTE (ILBB @ 18/02/2013, 01:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
There was a topic very recently - a member's child got her period early and someone posted a link to a great bike pant that  guarantee no leakage and look just like bike pants.  I wonder if anyone remembers the name??? Might be helpful if your daughter starts menstruating soon as well.


Ooh that could be handy!

She has been wearing the little crop top style bra for at least 6-8 months now. She knows lots about puberty, has read a good book and we always answer questions for her.

I did have a feeling she'd be on the borderline for precocious puberty where they'd halt it, the paed was in two minds about it. My curiousity was whether the saying that they stop growing in height after puberty was true and if so, would that mean she'd be terribly short? She's very short now, as it is, so if puberty starts and stops early that could be a concern. I don't know. We will most likely see an endocrinologist (paed suggested the possibility) we're just waiting on some test results back first (bloods, plus MRI due to other issues as well).

My sadness is really because she's so young to go through with this. She won't cope. She has Aspergers and anxiety and I know I'll end up at school helping with toileting if the period follows too soon. And who wants all that at 8? sad.gif

#9 Princess.cranky.pants

Posted 18 February 2013 - 01:09 PM

My DD is 8 in April. She is starting develop in the chest. I think she will need some bra singlets this year.

No other changes so far apart from putting on bit of weight   around the tummy and growing tall. Is there any issues with early puberty?

DD is so young, she is my baby and I don't want this for her yet. When it happens I will celebrate it with her, but really getting your periods when you are so young is not great. I wore bras in grade 7 (primary school here). It was not fun being one of very few girls needing bras.

I am also worried DD will the horrible acne that I did. I have terrible scars from it and I will go to hell and back to prevent that happening to my girls.

#10 kpingitquiet

Posted 18 February 2013 - 01:11 PM

Her other challenges could make it a difficult process for both of you. sad.gif As for height, I topped out at around 5'3" so not exceedingly short, but below average. I think following up with an endo is a great plan, but otherwise just keep it factual, normal, supportive.. and those bike pants sound awesome! Wish I'd had some.

Oh, as an aside, does her school have an on-staff nurse? Our school nurse was awesome and kept extra menstrual supplies, kept spare clothes on hand, kept a stash of travel-sized deodorant etc. If there is one, would clue in the school nurse and she/he may be able to give you some ideas as I'm sure they've seen it in the school before, maybe even with kids with compounding issues at play,.

#11 MrsLexiK

Posted 18 February 2013 - 01:19 PM

QUOTE (JaneDoe2010 @ 18/02/2013, 02:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My sadness is really because she's so young to go through with this. She won't cope. She has Aspergers and anxiety and I know I'll end up at school helping with toileting if the period follows too soon. And who wants all that at 8? sad.gif


Hi OP I went through this myself, I grew minimal since getting my period so I am on the shorter side but I was very tall beforehand.  It makes wearing heels easy and I have never had that problem that my sister has when some guys resent her for being taller then them.

I still played with my sister with dolls and stuff even after I got my period so it wasn't like it was the end of my childhood.  I understand your daughter has Aspergers as well which as far as I am aware I do not have so I am sorry I can't help you there (the only 2 Aspergers suffers I know are girls who had delayed puberty)

I was mega embrassed what helped was the fact my parents treated it as normal.

As you can see from my sig I have a few female issues there is evidence coming to light now that some of what I suffer from may have been due to early puberty and the early onset of my period BUT that also may not be true as my mum had/has endo as we believe her nan and mum did, and my fathers mother had PCOS and issues with overies so it is more likely my issues may have come from genetics rather then the early onset.



#12 IsolaBella

Posted 18 February 2013 - 01:19 PM

I was growing boobs in third grade. I got my first bra at the end of 6th grade.... I was 10DD. My 1st period at 12yrs of age (so had huge boobs for years beforehand).

I stopped growing at 4ft 11" at 13yrs. (My mum is only 5ft and dad 5'7" so no height genes). I did grow an extra bit at 18yrs after I finished school which to me to 150cm n height.


I have bookmarked this for DD for the future if she takes after me

http://www.buddiesunderwear.com.au/

#13 vanessa71

Posted 18 February 2013 - 01:27 PM

I went through puberty fairly early, though it wasn't precocious and I think DD will be the same, unfortunately. I was a C cup at 11, got my period when I was ten, I was also very tall, however I certainly can't say that I have ended up short. At 10, I was 167cm tall and at 13 when I stopped growing I was (still am) 177cm tall. I definitely remember having pubic and underarm hair when I was 9.



#14 AMPSyd

Posted 18 February 2013 - 01:30 PM

This is a silly question but what age is early puberty considered.

I remember being an early teen with no signs of puberty. Mum took me to an endo to see about meds to start puberty (something they did back in the 80s with boys). Thankgoodness the doctors were wary of giving girls meds to start puberty. I just started late.

DS (in Yr 6) went on a 3 day camp and apparently many of the girls mums were packing pads - just in case. The classes of Yr 6 were told that by Yr 6 they should all be wearing deodorant (boys and girls).

My DD is 7 1/2 - I just hope she kind of follows my lead (but she is very different to me).

Edited by AMPSyd, 18 February 2013 - 01:32 PM.


#15 mumsyof3

Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:37 PM

My heart goes out to you at this time. It is so hard and I've been there.
My daughter started developing pubic hair when she was only 4 years old and this totally freaked me out. Her GP wasn't that worried about it but did refer her to a paediatrician. They said that they would just wait and see if it progressed further, and it did continue to grow.
It was when she was 7 years old that I finally convinced them to do something about it as she was growing breasts and had alot of pubic hair. They said that it isn't medical reasons that they would be treating her but would do it for social reasons, isn't that reason enough?!?!? She received an injection every month until she was ten to halt the progression of puberty, which was hard but neccessary. Then once they stopped the injections she did go through puberty normally although perhaps progressed a little faster.
She is now 16 years old and a lovely young lady. The teen years have been very trying for us as she has had to grow up sooner and thinks she is alot older than what she really is. It has been hard on her emotionally and socially, although we were always very private about what was going on. I think she always felt that she was different to the other girls and was always scared that someone would tease her. She had to deal with things that other girls her age didn't have to think about. I think one really important thing is to try and keep them age appropriate, it's hard when they are growing up so quick. Keep things like clothing, music, movies etc. suitable to their real age and don't expect too much from them just because they seem older.
I am happy to answer any questions about it if I can help you. I remember it seeming like a very lonely isolating time. It can be hard dealing with the medical profession and then dealing with it for real at home. It is important that you don't let the medical professionals tell you that this is normal. Yes, I'm sure they see many more cases of it now, but it is so unfair on our children if we don't get medical help for them. You are their advocate and they need your help to be their voice.

#16 JaneDoe2010

Posted 18 February 2013 - 03:16 PM

QUOTE (kpingitquiet @ 18/02/2013, 02:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Oh, as an aside, does her school have an on-staff nurse? Our school nurse was awesome and kept extra menstrual supplies, kept spare clothes on hand, kept a stash of travel-sized deodorant etc. If there is one, would clue in the school nurse and she/he may be able to give you some ideas as I'm sure they've seen it in the school before, maybe even with kids with compounding issues at play,.


No nurse, but I'm close by to the school, and it's a small school so me going there would be fine, also not out of the ordinary as I'm there a lot anyway, helping with other stuff.

QUOTE (lsolaBella @ 18/02/2013, 02:19 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have bookmarked this for DD for the future if she takes after me

http://www.buddiesunderwear.com.au/


Thank you!

QUOTE (mumsyof3 @ 18/02/2013, 03:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My heart goes out to you at this time. It is so hard and I've been there.
My daughter started developing pubic hair when she was only 4 years old and this totally freaked me out. Her GP wasn't that worried about it but did refer her to a paediatrician. They said that they would just wait and see if it progressed further, and it did continue to grow.
It was when she was 7 years old that I finally convinced them to do something about it as she was growing breasts and had alot of pubic hair. They said that it isn't medical reasons that they would be treating her but would do it for social reasons, isn't that reason enough?!?!? She received an injection every month until she was ten to halt the progression of puberty, which was hard but neccessary. Then once they stopped the injections she did go through puberty normally although perhaps progressed a little faster.
She is now 16 years old and a lovely young lady. The teen years have been very trying for us as she has had to grow up sooner and thinks she is alot older than what she really is. It has been hard on her emotionally and socially, although we were always very private about what was going on. I think she always felt that she was different to the other girls and was always scared that someone would tease her. She had to deal with things that other girls her age didn't have to think about. I think one really important thing is to try and keep them age appropriate, it's hard when they are growing up so quick. Keep things like clothing, music, movies etc. suitable to their real age and don't expect too much from them just because they seem older.
I am happy to answer any questions about it if I can help you. I remember it seeming like a very lonely isolating time. It can be hard dealing with the medical profession and then dealing with it for real at home. It is important that you don't let the medical professionals tell you that this is normal. Yes, I'm sure they see many more cases of it now, but it is so unfair on our children if we don't get medical help for them. You are their advocate and they need your help to be their voice.


Thank you for sharing your story, especially being your first post!!

I can't tell you how much I appreciate all the comments, it really is a tough time - more for me than for her, right now. We've just had last year going through the Aspergers/anxiety diagnosis now this. I have my own mental health struggles and it's just tough.

#17 Super Cat

Posted 18 February 2013 - 04:31 PM

I would absolutely insist on having her seen by a paediatric endocrinologist. At age 8 yes it can be the very early end of normal but you're right in that once puberty stops she stops growing. We saw a great endo paed at the childrens but I think there are other good ones around your area, closer than RCH anyway.

#18 opethmum

Posted 18 February 2013 - 05:36 PM

I am an Aspie and I have anxiety, look if she has the facts about what she is going through the better the outcome. Most Aspie's I know love factual information and that helps us cope better with whatever comes our way. Hey I even helped my older sisters deal with theirs before I had mine!
I know you want to shield her from the eventuality of periods but I think stopping the hormones will not stop the eventual return of her periods and I think the more you drag it out the more anxious she might be.
If she is taught how to manage her period from the get go then she will be in good stead. If you give her rules on how to manage them e.g. change the pad every 3/4 hours and make sure she has access to the appropriate bathroom at school to change things. Having protective clothing e.g. bike pants and having spare change of clothing in her bag when her period is and just having spare pads in the car, handbag etc will give her some comfort in case they start in an awkward place.
I know it is a lot to take in and that your girl is growing up and I think this should be a chance to foster a deeper connection with your daughter. I think being open and honest with her about what is going on will help and bring about a mature dialogue and open the channels to discuss more things that will happen later on.
Don't underestimate her ability to cope with things like this.

I do wish you the best and I do hope your DD well with the issues facing her.

#19 JaneDoe2010

Posted 18 February 2013 - 06:04 PM

QUOTE (Super Cat @ 18/02/2013, 05:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would absolutely insist on having her seen by a paediatric endocrinologist. At age 8 yes it can be the very early end of normal but you're right in that once puberty stops she stops growing. We saw a great endo paed at the childrens but I think there are other good ones around your area, closer than RCH anyway.


Thank you - if you can recall any names you'd recommend please PM me D, I'd really appreciate it as good recommendations are hard to come by. original.gif

QUOTE (opethmum @ 18/02/2013, 06:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I am an Aspie and I have anxiety, look if she has the facts about what she is going through the better the outcome. Most Aspie's I know love factual information and that helps us cope better with whatever comes our way.


You're right about loving the facts, she's VERY much like that! She's not worried about the procedure at all, probably more worried she won't be able to be still so long LOL! That girl can TALK and talk and talk and... you get the picture.

As for halting/delaying puberty, we'd only go that direction if recommended by a professional. It's more the growth thing I'm concerned about as she's short for her age, although she has grown more in the last year.

#20 KT1978

Posted 18 February 2013 - 10:40 PM

Regarding growth, I think I was told by a surgeon that bone growth usually stops around 2 years after periods start. For me that was pretty correct (13-14). I'm 172cm though, so not short.

The reading I've done on puberty suggests that weight is a trigger. So taller or chubbier girls are more likely to go through puberty early. This makes sense to me, the late bloomers I know we're often gymnasts or dancers so very lean. If you don't fit the 40kg criteria perhaps it is more likely to be something for a doctor to look at?

I think dd's hormones are really kicking in now. She is often teary, but what she is upset about doesn't make sense etc. poor thing.  sad.gif

#21 JaneDoe2010

Posted 19 February 2013 - 05:50 AM

The weight thing is interesting as the paed thought that her drastic weight increase (yes, she's hit the 40kg mark) this last year could be a symptom, rather than a cause, of puberty??

#22 JustBeige

Posted 19 February 2013 - 06:37 AM

QUOTE (ILBB @ 18/02/2013, 01:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
There was a topic very recently - a member's child got her period early and someone posted a link to a great bike pant that  guarantee no leakage and look just like bike pants.  I wonder if anyone remembers the name??? Might be helpful if your daughter starts menstruating soon as well.


They are called Buddies. They are BRILLIANT and the lady who runs / owns it Danielle, is an awesome person.  (no shes not my friend, I'm a customer original.gif  )  

The postage is included in the price. They arent very stretchy, so if you are / have a size 10-12 (adult) child  who is over 50kgs, then get the large..
Happy to be PM'd if you need any more info on them


JD - DD was doing the same thing around the same age, but then would seem to 'stop' for a period of 6 - 8 mths and then would  show the next sign/step towards getting her period.

here is a link for you; http://kidshealth.org/parent/medical/sexual/precocious.html

Edited by JustBeige, 19 February 2013 - 06:56 AM.


#23 Super Cat

Posted 19 February 2013 - 06:07 PM

Will send through a couple of names as soon as I get the kids into bed.

#24 JaneDoe2010

Posted 19 February 2013 - 07:14 PM

Thank you, everyone. I really appreciate all the help, I never thought I'd deal with this so early, I wasn't quite ready! LOL! Let alone her! She'll probably be proud of it - she's a bit weird like that. Now she knows she's an Aspie she proudly proclaims it. tongue.gif




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