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Waking sleeping baby


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#1 ms1

Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:57 PM

I have received a lot of conflicting advice and would appreciate some input from other mothers. My 16 day old baby sleeps easily for 4 to 5 hours, if we let home, during the day and overnight. One night he went 8 hours between feeds because he slept and I'd forgotten to put my alarm on to wake up to feed him (this was unusual he's usually up during the night then early morning). I have been told I have to wake him to feed him for his sake and to keep up my milk supply. I'm worried i'm no good at feeding so he is slow and also worried my supply will drop which will impact breastfeeding down the track. So I have tended to wake him after 3 hours if he hasn't woken naturally... But it seems to me that his body is working hard while he's sleeping and I shouldn't keep disrupting him. He feeds for around 45 mins, sometimes more and he does tend to do a cluster feed at night. he's putting on weight and generally shows every sign of good health. Thoughts?

#2 IVL

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:02 PM

If he is growing, has wet nappies and seems content, let him sleep and count your blessings!

#3 Clever Clogs

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:04 PM

I probably wouldn't go longer than five hours but its almost an impossible question to answer! Every mum and baby is slightly different.

Maybe try the ABA, they are mothers and can talk about your situation in more detail.

1800 mum 2 mum

#4 a letter to Elise.

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:10 PM

Is that just overnight? If he is gaining well, alert, no jaundice, I wouldn't wake him overnight. The only exception would be if I was extremely engorged and lumpy and worried about mastitis. If he's feeding 8 or so times a day your supply shouldn't be affected. It wasn't unusual for ds to sleep for 4 or 5 hours at that age.
You might want to wake him during the day. I chose not to, and I found by about 3-4 weeks, ds and dd started to figure out the difference between night and day by themselves.
You say you were told to wake him, and have been setting alarms to get up. Was there a medical reason for that?

#5 ms1

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:11 PM

QUOTE (IVL @ 14/02/2013, 04:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If he is growing, has wet nappies and seems content, let him sleep and count your blessings!


That's my natural instinct! He has full nappies and seems fine. I'm just worried about the feeding situation down the track. The advice from a LC and ABA is wake him because of supply issues for me...

#6 ms1

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:14 PM

QUOTE (Matthias' mum @ 14/02/2013, 04:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Is that just overnight? If he is gaining well, alert, no jaundice, I wouldn't wake him overnight. The only exception would be if I was extremely engorged and lumpy and worried about mastitis. If he's feeding 8 or so times a day your supply shouldn't be affected. It wasn't unusual for ds to sleep for 4 or 5 hours at that age.
You might want to wake him during the day. I chose not to, and I found by about 3-4 weeks, ds and dd started to figure out the difference between night and day by themselves.
You say you were told to wake him, and have been setting alarms to get up. Was there a medical reason for that?


The reason for waking him is because I've been told I need to for my supply to be maintained long term. I don't feel extremely engorged but he feeds around 7 times a day. I wish I could jump ahead 6 months, know it's going to be ok, and just relax while he's enjoying some goods sleeps. He does have the unsettled times in the evening where he hardly sleeps between feeds.

#7 Future-self

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:29 PM

I was told that 7 times a day wasn't enough to build/maintain supply in those early days and that I really had to ensure absolute minimum of 8 good feeds in 24 hours with 5 hours between feeds overnight acceptable. That was absolute the minimum and both the LC and ABA said just keep putting him on the breast and really aim for more than 8. DS fed (and still feeds!) for about 40 minutes each time so I found it hard too. You may also find that about 3 weeks is when they can stop being so sleepy and become more alert so he may stop sleeping so long all by himself  wink.gif

#8 Clever Clogs

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:31 PM

Generally there is a growth spurt around 3-4 weeks so this might not continue ... Just a friendly warning!

#9 cuddlebud

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:49 PM

I was told 3.5 hours during the day and five hours during the night. My own instinct was to let bubs be and sleep but it kinda backfired. I got engorged, bubs wouldn't feed which led to low supply and it took a good couple of months to boost it back up.

Also I think that the shorter gap during the day can help bubs adjust to days/nights etc.

#10 lucky 2

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:50 PM

I don't want to go against the advice of your LC, you can usually tell everything is going well if you have healthy breasts and nipples and your baby is weeing, pooing and growing. That means your baby is getting plenty of milk.
I used to wake my baby in the day just to try to tank her up so she would get as much milk in the day and not wake all night (it didn't work though!).
If you gently rouse him and he feeds well that's fine, if you interrupt him and he doesn't feed well then that is counter-productive.
Things quickly change, keep in touch with your LC .
All the best.




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