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Thank you gift ideas
For Obstetrician and midwife...


27 replies to this topic

#1 eleven

Posted 14 February 2013 - 06:24 AM

Hi all,

I would like to give a thank you gift to my Obs and midwife when I go for my 6 week check up. I was a very nervous FTM throughout my pregnancy and both my Obs and MW were so fabulous and reassuring. I'm just stuck for ideas... Did you give your team a gift? What was it?

Thanks

#2 eleven

Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:20 PM

No ideas at all?

#3 Maserati Mum

Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:27 PM

I just gave mine a card and a big bunch of flowers (for my OB and his midwife), and I'll do the same again but maybe add some chocolates or something because it will probably be my last baby.

#4 lovingmother

Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:35 PM

Most give a card with the babies foot print and a photo.

#5 niggles

Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:40 PM

A jar of lollies that can be placed in the staff area and shared.

#6 Feral Grey Mare

Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:45 PM

I thought paying the bill was thanks enough.

#7 eleven

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:47 PM

DH agrees that paying the bill is thanks enough but I really would like to do something more...

#8 elmo_mum

Posted 14 February 2013 - 04:17 PM

chocolates never go astray!!!

or lollies!!!

or just a nice bunch of flowers, and a card with bubs footprints/photo!

#9 ~Nic~

Posted 14 February 2013 - 04:20 PM

I always liked the baby name book that it was in the waiting room at my ob's office, and one of the receptionists told me once that it was a gift from a mum after she had her bub... more for the office than the doctor though I suppose...

Maybe a nice glass jar with some lollies in it so the jar can be re-used??

Edited by ~Nic~, 14 February 2013 - 04:21 PM.


#10 More than a Mother

Posted 14 February 2013 - 04:35 PM

I treated him to several rounds of golf and probably a contribution to his car/house/annual holiday.  wink.gif

#11 Blossom73

Posted 15 February 2013 - 10:15 AM

I baked cookies for the midwives (went through a BC) and brought them in with a card and a photo.

#12 Lokum

Posted 15 February 2013 - 12:36 PM

card to the midwives (thanking them all, and naming particular ones who were especially kind/helpful), and card to the OB with photo of DS.

Paid the OB a huge fee, so she doesn't need a gift, although I have seen bottles of wine in her rooms from happy parents.

I also sent a card with photo to my FS each time.

#13 Lokum

Posted 15 February 2013 - 12:45 PM

QUOTE (ssorrrento @ 14/02/2013, 05:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I treated him to several rounds of golf and probably a contribution to his car/house/annual holiday.  wink.gif


See my other thread on Medicare/Medibank and my huge OOP expenses.

Perhaps I am also sad because the anaesthetist was talking about her children's schools and all the speech nights etc she had to attend. (3 kids at Melbourne's most expensive schools - I guess someone has to pay for it!!)

#14 Gumbette

Posted 15 February 2013 - 12:53 PM

I gave my OB a bottle of Verve after each birth, and the midwife got a bottle of french perfume.  I loved my support staff.  My  anaesthetist only charged $800 for an after hours call out in a private hospital so I was pretty pleased with him too, but as I didn't really have much of a relationship with him, I didn't feel the need to buy a gift, though I was just as grateful for his help.

#15 drmiaow

Posted 15 February 2013 - 01:04 PM

I understand where you are coming from OP, I too felt very grateful for the care I received and wanted to acknowledge that (beyond simply paying their professional fees).

I wrote a card (with my beautiful boys photo on it of course) and gave him a good bottle of red. The midwives I gave chocolates and a fruit box, along with a card.

Everyone seemed appreciative and I really enjoyed giving something to these people who in my opinion had all been rather wonderful.

biggrin.gif



#16 Boombox

Posted 15 February 2013 - 01:14 PM

I gave my the care givers at my first birth a nice bottle of wine each and a card.

Subsequent births have been a card and goodie pack to the ward (basket with chocs, biscuits etc etc).

As a midwife I've had very lovely gifts, but a card is really meaningful, and I keep them all. (for the record-footprints inked on cards can have a slightly different meaning for midwives, not all that happy- a little photo suck in the card is much nicer  original.gif ).

Edited by thecleanowl, 15 February 2013 - 01:14 PM.


#17 07gbam

Posted 15 February 2013 - 07:33 PM

Having worked with quite a few of them, and having met their families, who put up with unsociable hours , stressful working life and disruption to their families' lives, a few suggestions come to mind:

flowers to bring home
baskets of fruit to bring home/share with staff
cupcakes to share
movie tickets ( to share with long suffering wife who stays home alone with kids all too often)
like someone else suggested, lollies for waiting room
books- but many of them never have time to read.
biscuits
tie


although you have paid them a hefty fee, most of them make personal sacrifices to do their jobs-christmas day, children's birthdays, family occasions, new years eve etc etc can be disrupted, and their families bear the brunt. no amount of money, or posh schooling can make up for mummy or daddy being absent while attending to the needs of someone else, and this can be hard to explain to small children who just want daddy or mummy to be there. after years of training and study, and day to day risk taking, and the ever present threat of the rabid lawyer waiting to collect a share of the payout when things go wrong, maybe people are entitled to a significant income. It's easy to envy this when you sit at home every night, every weekend, every christmas after doing your 3 year bachelor degree and never assuming the risk of caring for two human beings every day of your working life.
It doesn't have to say much to say a special thanks to midwives, teachers, doctors, nurses, and anyone who has a special vocation in their job, even when they are paid to do that job.
Nice to see some people still recognise that others go out of their way to consider the wellbeing of others.

#18 Goggie

Posted 15 February 2013 - 07:45 PM

I'm not sure I can follow the rant of the previous pp...kind of OT.

I went through a team midwife program so bought a card with his photo and a box of chocolates for the team to share. For my one midwife who was with me the whole labour I bought her a massage. She deserved it:)

#19 sarkazm76

Posted 15 February 2013 - 09:14 PM

For our midiwfe we ordered from Edible Blooms.
This one I think:
http://www.edibleblooms.com.au/p/cheeky-monkey-gift/615

Sock Monkey with a bucket of chocs original.gif  We saved a little cash by picking it up and dropping it to the hospital but she wasn't working that day so had to leave it for her but she facebooked me to say thanks original.gif
The staff who were there when we dropped it off thought it was fantastic, lol.


#20 Lokum

Posted 15 February 2013 - 10:44 PM

QUOTE (07gbam @ 15/02/2013, 08:33 PM)
15332509[/url]']
Having worked with quite a few of them, and having met their families, who put up with unsociable hours , stressful working life and disruption to their families' lives, a few suggestions come to mind:

flowers to bring home
baskets of fruit to bring home/share with staff
cupcakes to share
movie tickets ( to share with long suffering wife who stays home alone with kids all too often)
like someone else suggested, lollies for waiting room
books- but many of them never have time to read.
biscuits
tie


although you have paid them a hefty fee, most of them make personal sacrifices to do their jobs-christmas day, children's birthdays, family occasions, new years eve etc etc can be disrupted, and their families bear the brunt. no amount of money, or posh schooling can make up for mummy or daddy being absent while attending to the needs of someone else, and this can be hard to explain to small children who just want daddy or mummy to be there. after years of training and study, and day to day risk taking, and the ever present threat of the rabid lawyer waiting to collect a share of the payout when things go wrong, maybe people are entitled to a significant income. It's easy to envy this when you sit at home every night, every weekend, every christmas after doing your 3 year bachelor degree and never assuming the risk of caring for two human beings every day of your working life.
It doesn't have to say much to say a special thanks to midwives, teachers, doctors, nurses, and anyone who has a special vocation in their job, even when they are paid to do that job.
Nice to see some people still recognise that others go out of their way to consider the wellbeing of others.


LOL. I did send my FS, OB and the midwives a card with photo, and personalized and detailed message. Just didn't feel the need to add a gift, when the FS and OB in particular are many, many times richer than my family.

Funny, but when my work kept me away from my family, put me at considerable physical risk, took a toll on my marriage etc, no-one ever thanked me.

But then, it wasn't an emotional, romantic job like delivering babies. An essential public service, which attracted public service wages, utilized my 6 years of tertiary study, saw me work 2 Christmas Days in a row, 5 Australia Days in a row (which also happens to be my birthday), and one year, I worked every single frickn public holiday for 6 months.

Some people get to stack shelves, collect garbage, clean toilets, be police officers, prison wardens and child protection officers - and they have to make do with sh*tty wages. Your vent is misplaced.

Edited by Lokum, 15 February 2013 - 10:45 PM.


#21 porkchop's mama

Posted 17 February 2013 - 01:16 PM

I gave my obs a bottle of Mo√ęt and the MW and secretary some Jo Malone shower gel. We took bub along to 6 week appt to say hello.

#22 Fright bat

Posted 17 February 2013 - 07:55 PM

QUOTE (07gbam @ 15/02/2013, 08:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Having worked with quite a few of them, and having met their families, who put up with unsociable hours , stressful working life and disruption to their families' lives, a few suggestions come to mind:

flowers to bring home
baskets of fruit to bring home/share with staff
cupcakes to share
movie tickets ( to share with long suffering wife who stays home alone with kids all too often)
like someone else suggested, lollies for waiting room
books- but many of them never have time to read.
biscuits
tie


although you have paid them a hefty fee, most of them make personal sacrifices to do their jobs-christmas day, children's birthdays, family occasions, new years eve etc etc can be disrupted, and their families bear the brunt. no amount of money, or posh schooling can make up for mummy or daddy being absent while attending to the needs of someone else, and this can be hard to explain to small children who just want daddy or mummy to be there. after years of training and study, and day to day risk taking, and the ever present threat of the rabid lawyer waiting to collect a share of the payout when things go wrong, maybe people are entitled to a significant income. It's easy to envy this when you sit at home every night, every weekend, every christmas after doing your 3 year bachelor degree and never assuming the risk of caring for two human beings every day of your working life.
It doesn't have to say much to say a special thanks to midwives, teachers, doctors, nurses, and anyone who has a special vocation in their job, even when they are paid to do that job.
Nice to see some people still recognise that others go out of their way to consider the wellbeing of others.



Meh.

As a doctor who works similarly long hours to my obstetric colleagues I find your post odd. I don't expect thanks from my patients. It's my job. I don't 'go out of my way' for them - providing holistic, sensitive, available care to them is also my job. Nor do I expect gifts or thanks for it. I get paid for what I do. I get paid less in public, but the demands on me are less in public. I can choose to work in private, and the personal cost to me of working in private is met by substantially more financial recompense.

I think all your comments are misplaced. Highly paid professionals don't need thanks as well. The lesser paid nurses, theatre techs, kitchen and cleaning staff, and all the other people who suck up low pay and low status to do he jobs that make our worlds continue to run deserve thanks far more than a rich doctor.

#23 melski1

Posted 18 February 2013 - 08:09 PM

I bought my OB a small desk globe (from Myer I think). Cheesy, but because he helped to 'give me the world' and I know he likes to travel. I bought his staff a bucket of cookie man cookies.

#24 Tokotoko

Posted 08 March 2013 - 01:46 PM

I am also a doctor (GP) and agree with previous poster that we absolutely definitely don't expect gifts for just doing our normal job. In fact it makes me feel really awkward when patients spend money on such things for me, when I feel that I get remunerated well enough. So if you have to give anything, make it something that hasn't cost you money - eg I've had some nice cookies baked by a patient.

In the end, it's the sentiment that matters most. A card with some nice words and a photo is a MILLION times more meaningful and no gift is ever going to be as good or as meaningful as that. I always keep cards, whereas flowers, chocolates etc are gone in a few days and mean nothing.

Hope that helps wink.gif

#25 07gbam

Posted 08 March 2013 - 06:22 PM

When I had my children, we dropped back to the ward after a week or so and gave the ward staff ( all of them, not just the nurses) a huge basket of chocolates and fruit. Yes, everyone needed thanking.
And it's so nice that in this modern world, people appreciate the work others do for them, and while not everyone can afford it, a small token can say it all. I gave my child health nurse a small gift when she was so supportive and went the extra mile for me when i needed help.
Sometimes people do more than 'just their jobs' and I am grateful for that.



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