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Walking home from school/bus (spin off)


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#1 Nora.

Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:49 PM

Okay, we've had the "irresponsible parents" thread going on about leaving kids alone at the bus stop. Which made me curious, what is the right age to let kids wait at the bus stop or walk home from the bus stop/school?

My two are 8 & 9. They walk home from the bus stop now. I used to pick them up until last year when my son had gastro & I was feeling a bit off. I told DD if I wasn't at the bus stop, to walk home as it meant I'd come down with it (turns out I didn't). She said "don't wait for me, I can walk home alone". It's about 250 metres away, no roads to cross. I was nervous as hell, pacing the floor, but she was so pleased when she walked through the door. Since then, I've let them both walk home from the bus stop alone. They don't want me there.

Most other days I walk to the school to pick them up. DD has now asked that she be allowed to walk home (it's a 750 metre walk). I get her across the one semi busy road, and then she can go from there. I'm walking behind her anyway, with my 8 year old. He's way too ditzy to be allowed to walk home on his own.

So, what age to do both?

#2 brangisnotaword

Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:56 PM

Well my children will be given phones this term (they are 6 and 7) I will force them to FaceTime me whenever they are out of my sight.  I must know where they are, who they are talking to, and what they are doing 24/7

They'll walk into a few telephone poles, but f*ckit, they'll be safer.

#3 TeaTimeTreat

Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:59 PM

QUOTE (Nora. @ 13/02/2013, 05:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Okay, we've had the "irresponsible parents" thread going on about leaving kids alone at the bus stop. Which made me curious, what is the right age to let kids wait at the bus stop or walk home from the bus stop/school?

My two are 8 & 9. They walk home from the bus stop now. I used to pick them up until last year when my son had gastro & I was feeling a bit off. I told DD if I wasn't at the bus stop, to walk home as it meant I'd come down with it (turns out I didn't). She said "don't wait for me, I can walk home alone". It's about 250 metres away, no roads to cross. I was nervous as hell, pacing the floor, but she was so pleased when she walked through the door. Since then, I've let them both walk home from the bus stop alone. They don't want me there.

Most other days I walk to the school to pick them up. DD has now asked that she be allowed to walk home (it's a 750 metre walk). I get her across the one semi busy road, and then she can go from there. I'm walking behind her anyway, with my 8 year old. He's way too ditzy to be allowed to walk home on his own.

So, what age to do both?



Depends where you live but walking home with no roads to cross a short way 9 or 10 depending on the child, for crossing roads I would say 11 or 12, again depending on the maturity of the child.



#4 Nora.

Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:02 PM

I'm a bit thingy about roads. Our street is quiet, so DD is okay but anything more than our street & I'd be worried.

I was in my car today at the corner and a boy was chatting to me (he'd asked his dad if my son could come over & had approached me to say it was okay), he then started walking towards a busier road (one I won't let DD cross), and I yelled at him, he ignored me & kept walking, I screamed at him. His dad was there, along with about 5 other parents. I felt awful yelling at a child in front of his father, but I could see a car coming.

Kids and roads scare me, but I do agree there comes a time where you have to start giving them freedom. DD is 10 this year & I'm slowly letting go.

#5 unicorn

Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:02 PM

Currently the bus driver won't let DD7 off the bus if there isn't anyone there to pick her up, we are last stop so she will wait 10 minutes and if I haven't turned up she will ring me. Gotta love country living lol. So I haven't broached the idea of DD walking home by herself, it would only involve walking across the road and climbing through the fence, but it's nice that the bus driver ensures there is someone there for her and she knows she isn't going home to an empty house.

#6 JustBeige

Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:03 PM

It depends on the child. #1 would have been sensible enough to cross at lights and walk home (approx the same distance as you) at the same age. #2, no way in hell.  He would have charged across roads to catch up with people or if it was raining.

He had zero road / carpark sense until he was at least 9/10.

now they are in yr6 and 7. they catch buses and walk etc without a problem.

I also think its not just the kids, but the people who they walk with plus how busy the road is.


lol, I know thats not hysterical enough for EB, so maybe just ignore my comments happy.gif

#7 LynnyP

Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:21 PM

My daughter's school has school owned school buses with school employed drivers.  They are not allowed to let a child under 10 off the bus without a parent, guardian or older sibling waiting at the stop.

#8 *JAC*

Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:49 PM

My 9yo and 6yo (almost 7) both walk to school.  The school is literally 50 metres away from my house and I wave to them when I drive past them to drop the youngest off to childcare and go off to work - they are on school grounds before they're out of my sight.





#9 Gloriana

Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:51 PM

DD is 9yrs old and I still walk her to and from school. It's not DD I don't trust but the stupid parents around the school. The stupid parents who park on the verge and you have to pretty much walk out onto the road to see around them. Besides that road DD would be fine to get home.
I am not sure what age I will let her walk home alone.

#10 Canberra chick

Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:58 PM

DS will be eight next month. He started walking/cycling/scooting to and from school alone this term.
It is a bike path with no roads to cross and is used extensively by the community, so it's not some quiet wee lane. It also only takes him five minutes if he's on wheels, ten by foot.
I am more than happy for him to do that, and he is loving it.

DH waves him off in the morning before heading off himself and I now go straight home from work and I am there to meet him.

I would be happy for him to get a bus that dropped him off directly at his school. But as we school locally, it's not an issue.

#11 TiredbutHappy

Posted 13 February 2013 - 07:10 PM

QUOTE (LynnyP @ 13/02/2013, 07:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My daughter's school has school owned school buses with school employed drivers.  They are not allowed to let a child under 10 off the bus without a parent, guardian or older sibling waiting at the stop.

Same here. If you're late to the bus stop driver will call you to see how far away you are and try to wait, if that's not possible they drive the child back to the depot.

#12 Expelliarmus

Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:17 PM

My children began walking home, with someone waiting for them at the other end when the oldest was 12 and the youngest was 9. There are no major roads to cross. I would not do it any younger.



#13 Oriental lily

Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:12 AM

I was reading this thread yesterday plus the other one about leaving children at bus stops and I was starting to think I should loosen the apron strings andlet her walk the 10 minute 400 meter walk to school which is just around the corner. She is 9.

Wake up this morning and read the paper with my morning cuppa and see this.


http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/teen-tra...0214-2ee0q.html

Barrie's road is about 2 km from us.

I noticed this morning that a young girl of about 12 who walks normally alone was walking with her mum this morning.
So I think parental habits and what people feel comfortable about is determined by their neighborhood and how safe we feel.

Having something like this happen so close and who is currently still at large scares you.
Really rattles your trust.



#14 dadathome

Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:17 AM

DS9 walks a block form school to the public bus stop, and catches a bus which drops him a block and a half from his old school (now DS5's school). He walks to that school to either after school care, or meet one of us and his brother, crossing major roads at traffic lights (same for road crossings on the way to school.

Last year he walked home wholly under his own steam a couple of days a week. We have given him a phone this year, but he hasn't yet had an interview with his principal to be allowed to have it at school.

#15 brazen

Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:35 AM

i am planning to let my older 2 walk home this year, once they settle in. they are currently 9.5 and 8. won't let the nearly 7yo do it though as she is not sensible like they are. I am trying to find another child they could walk with just for safety in numbers original.gif

it will require crossing a few roads, generally not busy, and will take around half an hour. there are many other kids who walk the same route from a younger age

#16 Ianthe

Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:38 AM

My 10yo and 8yo walk to and from school together. It's a quiet community but lots of kids walking and riding bikes at that time of the day.

#17 GoneWithTheWhinge

Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:49 AM

QUOTE (MylittleTurtle @ 13/02/2013, 07:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The stupid parents who park on the verge and you have to pretty much walk out onto the road to see around them.


Please phone your local council and request a ranger come to your school. They will more than likely happily oblige and if they get parental requests will add the school to the 'round' and you will get a greater presence there and hopefully better parking. Please also ask the school to request a ranger visit.


I have done this at my daughters school when people were parking across dropped kerbs, right before a crossing, in the no stopping zone, in the bus zone and someone was there within a couple of days. Other parents did the same and now there is barely a week goes by without either a morning or an afternoon visit. Its a much safer place for the children to be.


#18 charlie-lori

Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:50 AM

QUOTE
So I think parental habits and what people feel comfortable about is determined by their neighborhood and how safe we feel.

Having something like this happen so close and who is currently still at large scares you.
Really rattles your trust.


That is awful what happened to that poor girl sad.gif

Regarding your bolded bit this is so so true.

When I read essential baby I realise that I must be in a hugely different area to most of the parents that do let their kids walk. There are people who talk about helicoptering and being overprotective and I can just tell they live in an area vastly different from my own and fail to see the evident social problems that may lead to a certain amount of helicoptering from other parents.

I actually trust my child fully with the road. It's predators like these I worry about. Or opportunistic drugged up d*ck heads, what ever they are. But while they are few and far between, there are certainly there and much more present and visible in certain areas.

So I think it's important tokeep this in mind that not all of us live in the inner west of Sydney or nice tree lined burbs where the general atmosphere is percieved as less dangerous.

#19 mel43

Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:52 AM

My 2 were walking home from the bus stop at 5 and 7. They only had one road to cross, and that was right out the front of our house.

We moved to about 750m away from the school with at least 2 quietish roads to cross. They started walking home at ages 10 and 12. I still drive them to school because miss 14 can't get ready early enough rolleyes.gif

Both times they asked me, I felt anxious at first, but you have to let go sooner or later.

#20 Rock of Empathy

Posted 14 February 2013 - 09:38 AM

My 10 & 7 year old ride their bikes to & from school a couple of days a week - it's about 1.4km.

They have been doing this for probably 18 months or more now, although our old house was closer (about 500m from school).




#21 cward

Posted 14 February 2013 - 11:17 AM

My DD's are 10 (yr 5) and 6 (yr 1). They get the bus home a couple of times a week and usually I am at the bus stop to meet them, even though my DD1 doesn't want me to be.  If I am not at the stop when the bus arrives I am usually on the other side of the road waiting to cross.  They have to cross two busy roads but the both have traffic lights so they wouldn't cross without the walk.  On Tuesday I had gone to school to pick them up but they had forgotten and gotten the bus.  By the time I got home they had walked home nad were waiting for me (my mum lives there so she was with them)

#22 Vickery

Posted 14 February 2013 - 12:45 PM

My eldest, aged 8 and in Year 3, has started walking to and from school alone this year. It is 1.7kms each way and he has to cross 2 quiet roads by himself and 3 pedestrian crossings (2 of which have lollipop ladies). We have been walking to and from school together for 3 years so he is very familiar with the route and road rules.
Our school rules are Year 3 and above can walk/ride alone. Years 1 and 2 can walk/ride with an older sibling with a note from the parents.

#23 fillesetjumeaux

Posted 15 February 2013 - 07:28 PM

My 10yo and 8yo walk 3km to school in the mornings - the 10yo started doing this last year with a friend.  The route is reasonably safe, barring one pedestrian crossing that drivers like to ignore completely.  But at some point I figured they needed to learn to cross it, and even if it annoys the drivers, I've told them they must wait until cars in both directions are at a complete stop before they cross!

When they were in infants' school (K-2), they also walked, but only because it was about 250m down the road, with no roads to cross, and I could see them until they were 2/3 of the way there.

All 3 girls (DD3 is 6) catch the bus home in the afternoon (there's no morning bus).  I am tempted to let them walk home from the bus stop (it's only a couple of minutes' walk past the infants' school) but it involves the nasty pedestrian crossing, and I don't trust DD3 to listen to her sisters.  So I walk up and meet them.

The great thing about DD1 and her friend walking last year (and it has continued this year) is that children from their school past whose houses they had to walk, or who were driven from streets along their route, started coming out of the woodwork and walking with them!  I haven't seen it yet, but friends who have driven past the gaggle of walkers say it is wonderful to see.

(And also, the couple of times there has been an issue with one of the children wanting to do something out of routine - e.g. cross the road at a different spot - the children have all worked as a team to solve the "problem".)

#24 **Tiger*Filly**

Posted 15 February 2013 - 09:26 PM

----

Edited by Tyrone Finkelmeyer, 26 March 2013 - 08:01 PM.


#25 somila

Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:08 AM

We have a 25 minute walk with a major road (at a crossing) and some busy side road crossings which my two have been walking with me since birth.  Last year my older son was 12 and started walking it alone sometimes.  (I would check that his bag was in the racks when I dropped my other son off.)

This is FYOHS for him this year and it involves catching a bus,  and a shorter walk.




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