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(TMI...?) Think I have a prolapse... :(


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#1 leratocharlie

Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:53 AM

I delivered my daughter vaginally on 17th January... she was 9lb 7oz when born, so not small by any means.  They thought they'd need to vacuum her out as she was sunny side up, on a bit of an angle, but I managed to push her out with an epidural to deal with the back-to-back labour pain.

About 2 weeks ago (probably 10 days or so post-birth) I started to feel like things were about to 'fall out' inside... after some googling, it seems likely to be a prolapse.  I find it so frustrating when I'm walking, it's not as bad as many seem to have it - everything is still 'inside'...  but if I use a mirror and separate it, I can see a bulge that is all I can see inside now.

I'm so terrified that it won't get better, that I'll need to see many specialists, that they'll tell me they can't fix it til I've finished having children.

I had a bad experience a few years back where I was badly sexually assaulted, and this is why I'm so scared of having to have continuous doctor involvement, and/or continuous feeling of discomfort down there which I find makes me almost burst into tears when I'm walking around.

My daughter is 4 weeks old and I'm doing great with motherhood itself, but I just am so horrified about this and looking for any stories anyone can share with me if they have experienced something similar.

I'm going to go to my GP tomorrow, but it would be great to know what 'real people' have to say, rather than the GP potentially telling me it'll all be fine when this isn't normally the case.

Thanks for any help, it's really getting me down sad.gif



#2 The 8th Plum

Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:53 PM

Hi, I have a cervical prolapse from the vaginal delivery of my DS (now 3 3/4), which wasn't diagnosed until DS was 18 months old. I was told by the GP that it couldn't be fixed until I'd finished having children. I found out a couple of months ago that this is not the case, in the event that you have corrective surgery before you have finished having kids you then have c-sections (I assume because they don't like seeing surgical work undone). I have not had surgery yet and am having a c-section for #2 in any case.

Now I'm pregnant again and the physio at the hospital told me after the birth of number 2 is my best chance to make progress with exercises because the first couple of months after birth your body is naturally tightening everything back up and if you work hard on your pelvic floor you can make a lot of progress.

I'd suggest you get a referral to a specialist physio & gynae at your 6 week check up (before if you don't mind an extra visit to the doctor) as it is best to find out exactly what you're dealing with as prolapse varies a lot, and you want to be sure you're doing the pelvic floor exercises properly.

I did get up on the bed and do pelvic floor exercises with the (female) physio watching to check - I did find it confronting and embarrassing, not going to lie, but it didn't take long and when you think about all the other pokes and prods you undergo during pregnancy, birth, pap smears, mole checks, etc... it was not so bad.

Try to stay positive, be careful lifting, and get help. Your body can repair a surprising amount - and what you have described doesn't sound so bad. My cervix was actually hanging out and I am still not considered a bad case!

Take care & feel free to PM me if you like.

#3 snortle

Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:59 AM

-

Edited by snortle, 20 May 2014 - 09:31 PM.


#4 cordyline

Posted 18 February 2013 - 05:14 PM

OP, I think I might be in the same boat. DD is now 5 wks and was also sunny side up, did require vacuum. Although 8lbs 4 oz, so not quite as big.

I am due to have my 6wk checkup on Friday. Im worried. My cervix is very low. It is not hanging out but when I checked things out, it was right there staring back at me only about half an inch inside. Sometimes I think I can feel it but not sure if I am imagining it or not. I have been pretty good with doing my pelvic floors so was surprised and disappointed.

Tmi but it is so low that I am not sure how sex will be possible. There doesn't appear to be any room for anything else in there. I kind of wish I hadn't looked as now I am too scared to try. Will have to wait and see what OB says on Friday.

I have never been able to see my cervix as it has always been really high up before birth.




#5 Expelliarmus

Posted 18 February 2013 - 05:58 PM

You can still have sex with a prolapse where you can see your cervix. I have found it does retreat somewhat as you get *ahem* excited. And you can 'go behind it' (or in front of it depending which way it's falling I guess) It's easier in the missionary position than on top - not to put too fine a point on it - but it does sometimes also fall back a bit and gravity is on your side which does not happen with you on top.

And now that I have the sex advice out of the way ...

I can't tell you that it will be fine or won't be fine. Mine's not but it was repaired quite well which lasted for 5 years - the normal length of time - AFTER 3 very large babies. So there will come a time, probably when it will fall and not go back but mine certainly went back after the first (11lb) and wasn't a problem after the second (10lb) and even went back after three (9lb). It didn't actually 'fall' until #3 was 2yo.

So yes, the chances are that it will repair with some exercises if you get onto it straight away. It feels so much better when it's back in place.

#6 Beqa

Posted 18 February 2013 - 06:04 PM

OP, me too sad.gif I noticed it when putting in my Diva cup.  I haven't done anything about it.  Snortle what were the circumstances leading to you needing surgery.

#7 againagain

Posted 19 February 2013 - 09:13 PM

I had pretty much the same experience as R2D2.

I noticed the bulge that you describe OP, about 2 weeks after my 3rd was born. I googled and was so upset. All I read about was incontinence and painful sex and horrid things. I was devastated and so worried.

I went and saw my dr when my baby was 4 weeks and he almost snorted at me, he said it was only very mild and it wasn't my whole bladder hanging out (which is what I had thought!) it was the wall of the vagina. He also said it would get better over time and probably almost fully resolve once the baby weaned and the breastfeeding hormones left my body.

Well I didn't believe him at all. I thought he was full of it. I decided it must be much worse than what he was saying. It certainly felt awful and pretty bad to me, especially after a day on my feet.

My baby is now 2.5 years old and it has gone *almost* completely. It did continue to get better while I breastfed (until baby was 18 months) but the leftover bit of it quickly snapped back into place once she weaned. I don't even think about it anymore, it seems perfectly normal to me.

I am slightly worried about what will happen when this baby is born. My dr said for me it wasn't so mucht he size of the baby (8lb 10oz) but the speed she was born. Labour was incredibly short and the 2nd stage was under 2 minutes. Apparently that doesn't give things time to stretch nicely.

My advice is DO NOT GOOGLE. And see your dr for further advice  blush.gif

#8 snortle

Posted 20 February 2013 - 04:15 PM

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Edited by snortle, 20 May 2014 - 09:29 PM.


#9 lucky 2

Posted 20 February 2013 - 04:25 PM

Been there, done that, I saw a Gynecologist who just assessed it and sent me on to a womens health physio, it was intrusive (ie examination and assessment of muscles) so do you think you will be ok with a female providing care?
There are things you can do about it, you need the right diagnosis though.
Get is assessed ASAP and do your pelvic floor exercises (I hate them but they do help!).
All the best.

#10 snortle

Posted 20 February 2013 - 04:32 PM

QUOTE (lucky 2 @ 20/02/2013, 05:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Been there, done that, I saw a Gynecologist who just assessed it and sent me on to a womens health physio, it was intrusive (ie examination and assessment of muscles) so do you think you will be ok with a female providing care?
There are things you can do about it, you need the right diagnosis though.
Get is assessed ASAP and do your pelvic floor exercises (I hate them but they do help!).
All the best.


I agree the pelvic floor exercises make a BIG difference.
I suggest seeing a physio to make sure you are doing it correctly though original.gif

Edited by snortle, 20 February 2013 - 07:40 PM.


#11 Roobear

Posted 20 February 2013 - 05:42 PM

I had a prolapse too after the birth of DS. I was really upset about it actually sad.gif Anyway I saw a physio and she was confident with exercises that I would recover well. After 6 weeks of pelvic floor exercises it was 98% better she said and that I probably could only expect 98/99% anyway. I feel fully recovered now too original.gif




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