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ENDOCOMPRESIS
What works??? TMI


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#1 Lightning_bug

Posted 10 February 2013 - 09:32 PM

I know this is the wrong area but I'm desperate for traffic.

My son has been diagnosed with endocompresis.  I'm absolutely horrified with how constipated his is.  We're talking a lot of poo.

We've been given a stool softner and micro-enema thing but even with the application of these, nothing has moved.

I'm angry and frantic at the same time.  Angry because we visited so many doctors over the years and they've all been so blaise about it, dismissing us with the old 'give him more fibre and water' without really investigating why at 6 he is still soiling his pants.

So, has anyone been there and done that?  What can we do to help him?

#2 JuliaGulia

Posted 10 February 2013 - 09:33 PM

You need to send Balzac a message.  She's the poo expert around here original.gif

#3 Lightning_bug

Posted 10 February 2013 - 09:35 PM

Thanks Julia.  Did one of her children have endocompresis?


#4 JuliaGulia

Posted 10 February 2013 - 09:39 PM

If you do a post search you will find lots of info from her.  She really does know what she's talking about, and has given heaps of advice to other mums in the same situation as you.

So sorry for your son.

#5 Helen-Alice

Posted 10 February 2013 - 09:39 PM

Jus FYI it's encopresis original.gif

And I am sorry that it's taken so long to get answers.

I am sure other people with personal experience will be in soon, but just know that it will take a lot of laxatives and a long time to get your little one into a nice healthy bowel routine. ie months- years. That's not to say you won't see an improvement in a matter of weeks, but lots of bowel retraining needs to happen.

This is a very basic starting point http://www.rch.org.au/kidsinfo/fact_sheets/Constipation/

http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/enc...tml/context/556

Good luck xx

#6 Lightning_bug

Posted 10 February 2013 - 09:46 PM

Thanks Stan, Google's autofind has always given me what I've wanted with the wrong spelling.  lol.

I worry about giving him so many laxatives.  It's just a horrible thing to be intentionally pumping your child with.

And that horrible stool softening stuff.

I hate making him cry.

#7 luke's mummu

Posted 10 February 2013 - 10:00 PM

My son doesn't have you son's condition, but he does have chronic constipation secondary to refusing to eat and veges at all, and minimal fruits.

He is on Movical Junior every 2nd day, for the last 2 years. Initially we tried drinking it straight, he couldn't handle the taste. Now we mix with apple juice, or milo and milk. Neither of which is idea, but at least he drinks it. Really trial and error to see what your son can tolerate.

Hope you get some great advice here.

#8 Laborious Nicety

Posted 11 February 2013 - 01:38 PM

Movicol needs to be given in clear liquids to be most effective.  Osmolax works just as well in milk as in clear liquids.

#9 TheGreenSheep

Posted 11 February 2013 - 01:57 PM

Whilst DS2 3yr 8m doesnt have encopresis, he has a slow gut. Despite eating plenty of veg and fruit, high fibre breads, water, he just doesnt go! Same diet and DS1 goes all the time, different bodies, different gut.

I got heaps of advice from reading though threads related to soiling and holding on (thats what DS2 was doing). Balzac knows her stuff! Something I took away from them was the importance of routine and sitting on the toilet till empty, plus never let them block up! Ever!

So since then has movicol-half everyday. He has it with apple juice every morning before his brekky. We then head straight to the toilet and he sits with an ipad till hes empty. So far its worked.

We have had reductions in dose, blocked up within 2 days. Back to square 1. We have changes in routine, blocks up in 2 days. Back to square 1. And then starts the toilet refusal. Pooing in his night nappy. We arent confident to start night toilet training in any way until we are on top of it. I dont know when Ill reduce the movicol again, but we are not in any hurry.

OP goodluck.

#10 Carabosse

Posted 11 February 2013 - 02:06 PM

A great paed who knows their 'poo', Parachoc, regular routine and 'sitting' and most importantly time and a whole lot of patience because they really can't help the accidents. They don't know it is happening. It won't disappear overnight because they have to retrain their bowels and this can take months.

My eldest took about 6mnths. She wasn't bad but we had a little kit packed in her school bag (plastic ziplock bags, fresh undies and flush-able wipes) which she had to use at school 2 times in 6 months. She managed her condition pretty well through first year of school. (I was petrified!) We are now out the other side thank goodness.

Good luck!

Edited by Carabosse, 11 February 2013 - 02:07 PM.


#11 Kay1

Posted 11 February 2013 - 02:27 PM

Osmolax is a winner here. DS! was utterly traumatised by my attempts to give him Movicol. He won't drink juice so I put Osmolax in his milk. Good luck, its a difficult thing to deal with.

#12 EssentialBludger

Posted 11 February 2013 - 03:03 PM

We had the most success with actilax and parachoc. Movicol and osmolax did nothing.

#13 Laborious Nicety

Posted 11 February 2013 - 03:36 PM

The macrogols, movicol and osmolax, do do something--it just can be very slow if they are all you are using.  They soften the stool but if the bowel is very baggy, the stool can just sit there with no impetus to leave.  If they are not working, following up with bisacodyl drops or another laxative will help.

Actilax and parachoc are a stool softener and a laxative so it's the same principle where you are softening the stool and then stimulating the bowel to get moving.

#14 Quack Quack

Posted 11 February 2013 - 03:54 PM

I have a son who has suffered with Encopresis for the last 3 years, we went for 2 solid years where he never pooed on his own.... ever.  It was 4 - 5 enemas per week, just to keep it under some type of control

We had an admission to hospital late last year for severe constipation, his bowel was completely impacted and he needed a hospital strength enema along with a naso- gastric tube to clear him out from the top end.

It was horrific, I won't lie, having to go through that BUT since then he has been able to poo on his own!
He still needs to be told to poo, he won't choose to go to the toilet on his own but when I tell him to go he does and most times will poo on his own.

there is an end to it, most children grow out of it when they are around 8 years old, we were on a regime of parachoc & movicol for a little while after the hospital trip... but since then he has managed on his own and we haven't any further blockages.



#15 misseb

Posted 16 February 2013 - 04:41 PM

My nephew suffered with this for the past 3 years.  He was on microlax and that didn't help. After years of frustration it was suggested by a naturopath to look at his diet. After some trial and error with diets it has just been discovered that the constipation was caused by some vegetables - in particular broccoli & cauliflower. So far it has been 8 weeks without of those vegetables and 8 weeks without any constipation. He still had accidents for the first few weeks - due to a fear of it hurting like it had before. But so far 6 weeks in things seem to have done the trick.

I am not saying this is the problem, but another thing worth investigating. I can "hear" your frustration in your post and feel for you. Good Luck.

#16 CharliMarley

Posted 16 February 2013 - 04:51 PM

Suppositries (sp?) and getting them to sit on the toilet at a certain time of the day, everday at the same time, will make it a lot better. It does take years to cure though and once they are at school it is very embarrassing for them.

#17 Laborious Nicety

Posted 16 February 2013 - 04:56 PM

Diet is worth looking at--the usual culprits are dairy, wheat and soy.

Suppositories are a very oldfashioned way of dealing with encopresis and would actually be of no help whatsoever in helping the bowel empty as they only act on the rectum.  On their own, they are fairly useless.

#18 Romeo Void

Posted 16 February 2013 - 05:22 PM

My DS (aged 4.5) has it, we've been struggling for probably a year now but are starting to see results in the last 2 months.  It's taken all my intuition, all my energy to keep on top of it and get us to the point we are now (he previously would point blank REFUSE to go, deliberately sitting on the floor to force the sensation to push to go away) are getting spontaneous poo's from him sometimes.  

Our Dr suggested that a good 'benchmark' would be to get him to go no longer than 3 days between poo's if possible to help his bowel get back into a normal state (his poo would come out shaped like an orange).  We keep a little diary on the fridge and mark down any days he poo's, we draw a rough diagram of how big it was, any leaks he has and if we needed to use any meds and when.  Keeping the chart means that DH and I are a team and both can see what is going on.  This may horrify some people but we've had lots of success with letting DS run around naked and letting him poo on the grass.  May not work for some but my DS seems to like being naked and I guess it makes it spontaneous.

Best of luck, it's a draining thing to have to deal with.

#19 Laborious Nicety

Posted 16 February 2013 - 05:33 PM

The Bristol Stool Scale is very useful for record keeping.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_stool_scale

#20 mummydo

Posted 18 February 2013 - 01:02 PM

sorry no answers for you but i can sympathise as my 5yr dd has the same thing.
we are currently seeing paed who has her on osmolax once a day and see takes benefibre. he just keeps saying it take alot of time. My dd has never been constipated it stems from a fear of pooing and holding back in the past couple of years. she now has smears in undies 1 to 2 per day and never initiates toileting. it is sooooo frustrating esp as there is nothing i can do. i just want to scream and yell at her but it will only make things worse. I believe she knows she needs to go she just holds it in and cant hold it all in.
she has just started school and it makes me nervous every day (so far its ok she goes as soon as she gets home) she is also extremely shy and wont tell the teacher she has done it. I had to warn the teacher in case she smells it (soo embarassing)
anyway good luck with it all its so hard to go through with your child.




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