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For those who grew up with dogs...
Tell me what was awesome about it!


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#1 s'peachykeen

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:41 PM

We have an 8 month old Cavalier x Toy Poodle. He's the cutest thing imaginable, like a walking, wuffing teddy bear. But he's driving me absolutely nuts.

It's all regular puppy stuff - stealing the baby's toys (and chewing them), getting into things he's not supposed to (and chewing them), jumping, biting, chewing things. Did I mention the chewing?

I know, I know - there are no bad dogs, only bored, badly trained ones. And I'm trying to work on it. But I have a 4 month old DD who, in the rock-paper-scissors of life, beats the dog for my limited attention most of the time. Hard core training is going to have to wait a while.

DH grew up with dogs and LOVES them. I...am not a pet person, really. But there's a good chance DD will be an only, and we figured some non-adult companionship would be a good idea. The result being, we have a dog. Who is driving me nuts rolleyes.gif .

So, dog lovers of EB - tell me what you loved about growing up with dogs, and why this short term pain is going to have a long term upside!

#2 jmaz86

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:49 PM

I was an only child and grew up with a beagle cross who was a year younger than me...I lived on properties most of my life and having the dog was like have a best friend who would go on adventures with me. She ended up living until 18 years of age and we had so many fun times and memories. I have also vowed that I will always have pets of some form with my children.

#3 amberlee

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:52 PM

Growing up with a dog is a wonderful thing!

But you are also living my nightmare- which I managed to avoid thankfully!!!  I know it's too late for you now, but that's why we waited until my youngest was almost two before getting a dog, and then it was a 2 year old super-cute poodle x maltese rescue dog who is past the chewing, jumping, yapping stage.

A baby demands so much of your attention, and a puppy does too. I remember with the puppy I had when we were newly married being reduced to tears by her bad habits and my lack of puppy parenting skills.

Can you DH take a more active role in training the dog, especially since he is the one who is into them more? Perhaps regular obedience training? I'm sure others will have much better advice than me.

Good luck!!



#4 Rangeman

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:56 PM

Hi S'peachy,

I grew up with a dog but she was a puppy when I was 5ish so I don't remember but I now as an adult have 2 dogs of my own.  The first one a toy poodle X shi tzu was a nightmare chewer and he had company all day so absolutely no excuse for him being bored.  He chewed everything the worst being my Mum's lounge down to the wood (wasn't she impressed...LOL) lucky she loves him.  Fast forward 8 eight years and he is the most well behaved dog (and has been for many years), will chew his toys (esp anything with plastic eyes) but will not touch anything that's not his and just loves squash balls. He does eveything I tell him to and gets very upset if I raise my voice to him, when I go angry on his 1 year old brother he comes up to me crying (doggy style of course) saying 'It wasn't me Mum, I'm a good boy".

The second one wasn't a chewer but a digger and stopped doing that at about 8 months - I guess you just have to get through that first 12months but it's worth it for sure.

Give him another few months and you'll be pleasantly surprised (I hope)....

Good luck!

#5 little lion

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:56 PM

I think getting a puppy while pregnant was a silly idea. I have a four month old baby too and my dogs are 4 and 5 so already settled into our family.

I grew up with dogs but can't imagine the demands of a puppy and baby at the same time. Sorry I'm not much help with the practicalities, but I can say I see myself owning dogs for the rest of my life.

#6 gabbigirl

Posted 07 February 2013 - 03:06 PM

I actually didn't grow up with dogs, and really didn't like them.  Then we got one as a wedding present, and I panicked.  She wee'd all over our carpets, chewed up shoes, dug up our garden, and cried at night.  I called my husband at work and told her to give her away.  But then something switched in me.  She stopped doing all those things ( with some training).  And became lovable, and fun.  Se forced me to get out every day of our lives.  We have gone o to have two children and she is such a part of the family.  

Training might be hard  with such a little bub, but walking can't be.  Tire her out with long walks, with the bub in the pram.  Good for the dog, and good for you! Good luck!

#7 jibsi

Posted 07 February 2013 - 03:09 PM

Hi OP,

I'd like to apply the commonly used phrase "don't worry it gets easier!" to your puppy. Just as babies/toddlers get easier and do less damage to your property as they get older (in theory), so do dogs. You really are in the thick of it and depending on the breed, the time taken for them to settle down varies.

We have a mini schnauzer and welcomed her to the family when I was 12 weeks pregnant with my first baby. She is turning 4 in April and is such a different dog these days to what she was 2 or 3 years ago. She and my son have grown up together and are great mates (actually they play and fight like a human brother and sister!). So funny to watch....

I also had a dog growing up and have such wonderful memories of him. In fact my mum has his ashes in a special box at her place!

Stick it out with your pooch, it will be worth it in the long run.

p.s. Have you read that book "Marley & Me"? You'll probably feel better after that because that dog was super destructive :-)    

#8 Z-girls rock

Posted 07 February 2013 - 03:10 PM

Always had dogs.

LOVE  them to bits.

they are you little buddies. they love to do things with you. get into mischief with you. have cuddles etc with you.
dogs are the best.
It is about the unconditional love.

#9 countrychic29

Posted 07 February 2013 - 04:00 PM

love love love dogs!
We have 4 dogs growing up, the one that sticks in my mind was a boxer we got when i was 9 and he died when i was 18. My brother and i trained him took him for walks before and after school from the start (without parents) as a teenager having a crappy day i spent many hours talking to him and crying into his fur. - i took 4 days off work when he died sad.gif

After him we got a Lab (still around today) and he was a horror of a puppy, difficult to toilet train, chewed on everything!, ate socks and clothes the minute they dropped on floor and he hated going for walks and would lie down when he had had enough (im talking after 10minutes) he grew up eventually to be a lovely placid dog who still doesnt like doing much. However if every puppy was like him i would never get another dog.
I remember meeting DH (we were only 14 and 16) and i couldnt believe  that he had grown up without a dog, to me i thought if you had the means  and the time, the joy the whole family gets from a dog is priceless - DH  has the same attitude now, we have since got our own 2 dogs who are our family original.gif
It will get better

#10 boatiebabe

Posted 07 February 2013 - 04:17 PM

I am going to give you some advice because I was pretty much at the same point you are now a few years ago.

I got a puppy about five months before my DS was born, and I already had a two year old DD. I don't know what I was thinking. I was grieving my old dog who died a few months earlier and I thought a new puppy might fill the hole.

At the time I could not and did not give the pup enough of my time in training and it really was obvious.

He was a nightmare through no fault of his own. I could not take him for walks due to leash pulling etc and he generally was very unruly and unmanageable.

At approx 1 year of age I got someone in to train ME and then in turn I trained my dog. It really was quite simple and required a couple of intense sessions a day with my pup.

It took about two months of working on small things every day, and he turned into just the most wonderful dog who knew his place in the family and was much more secure and a real pleasure to be around.

People always compliment me on what a wonderful dog he is, and how obedient he is and what a good leash walker he is - if only they knew!

I highly recommend getting a professional in NOW to help you train him before his bad habits become more difficult to deal with.


#11 ~sydblue~

Posted 07 February 2013 - 04:25 PM

We had a border collie until I was about 8 or 9, and then a black labrador. The border collie was beautiful and so gentle, even with the farm animals such as the ducks and chooks.
The black lab was a gentle giant. He was very protective, especially of us kids when mum and dad weren't around. We used to take him swimming in the creek and estuary. Occasionally he would get to go to the beach.

#12 littlemissmessy

Posted 07 February 2013 - 04:33 PM

I grew up with lots of dogs and I loved them. As an adult I've owned dogs and some of them not the best behaved either. When we got our dog as a pup we were prepared and took her to dog training from day dot, but as you said, you have a 4mo who takes all your attention and time. Your dog will still be in the biting chewing stage for a while yet and I don't envy you the pup stage while having a baby as well. But your pup sounds adorable.

#13 *Spikey*

Posted 07 February 2013 - 05:14 PM

QUOTE (boatiebabe @ 07/02/2013, 04:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I am going to give you some advice because I was pretty much at the same point you are now a few years ago.

I got a puppy about five months before my DS was born, and I already had a two year old DD. I don't know what I was thinking. I was grieving my old dog who died a few months earlier and I thought a new puppy might fill the hole.

At the time I could not and did not give the pup enough of my time in training and it really was obvious.

He was a nightmare through no fault of his own. I could not take him for walks due to leash pulling etc and he generally was very unruly and unmanageable.

At approx 1 year of age I got someone in to train ME and then in turn I trained my dog. It really was quite simple and required a couple of intense sessions a day with my pup.

It took about two months of working on small things every day, and he turned into just the most wonderful dog who knew his place in the family and was much more secure and a real pleasure to be around.

People always compliment me on what a wonderful dog he is, and how obedient he is and what a good leash walker he is - if only they knew!

I highly recommend getting a professional in NOW to help you train him before his bad habits become more difficult to deal with.



This.

You will grow to hate/resent this dog unless you bite the bullet and train it. There is nothing less loveable than an out-of-control dog, and dogs are at their worst (behaviour wise) from 6 months to 2 years. Right when your child will be a toddler.

Whether you organise training for the dog, or your DH does it, doesn't matter - but someone really, really needs to pull their finger out and act now. This is a safety issue for your child, and a sanity issue for all members of the family.

Just because your dog is small and and fluffy doesn't mean it doesn't need to be trained properly.

My advice is to either hire in a personal trainer, or sign up to an obedience club and get your DH involved. Clicker training works best for most dogs, although method that focusses on positive reinforcement is fine.

It is a good opportunity for you to leave your DH with the baby, while you and the dog go off to school together. A nice break, plus an opportunity to bond with your dog. wink.gif

#14 tenar

Posted 07 February 2013 - 05:32 PM

Getting a puppy when you were about to have a baby was not the best idea.  Now you know why.

As PPs have said, you must train the puppy and it needs to be done now (actually it's needs to have been done since the day you brought the dog home).

Fortunately, 4month old babies are still portable and sleep lots (well, nearly all of them do, anyway).   So you still have a window of time in which to get the dog under control before the baby is mobile enough to be a challenge to the dog.  Get thee to a dog school ASAP and keep going (and it probably needs to be you, since you are presumably the one who is going to be around the dog most of the time, not your DH).  

It's going to get harder from here and much harder when bub hits about 12m and starts to be very mobile and increasingly defiant.  Crawling babies and toddlers are fascinated by dogs and can't be taught not to poke them, pull their ears, etc.  If the dog is not well trained by then you will have to separate them all the time, because you just can't keep your eyes on a mobile kid 100% of the time. The result of that is a bored, lonely and probably destructive dog and this is one of the ways in which 12 or 18 month old dogs end up discarded and waiting for death at shelters all over the country (not saying you would do this, OP, but many people quite clearly do).

#15 FiveAus

Posted 07 February 2013 - 08:54 PM

My dogs mean everything to me, they are my treasured companions, my friends, my exercise partners, my hobby.
I can't imagine any of them "driving me nuts", but I suppose every now and then one or the other annoys me a bit. I love them to the moon and back though, and now that my kids are grown up, the dogs sometimes DO trump the kids (visit kids, go to dog show, visit kids, go to dog show, visit kids, GO TO DOG SHOW).

Training doesn't need to be especially formal, you can just train as you go. Remove everything he shouldn't be chewing and put it out of his reach, praise him for playing with his toys, give him positive attention when you have a few minutes spare here and there. Walk him daily......this should be super easy to combine with a baby...dogs and prams are a lovely combination.

Please don't hate him, he just wants to please you and this stage won't last much longer. He sounds like a sweet little dog.

#16 s'peachykeen

Posted 07 February 2013 - 09:12 PM

Thanks dudes - good to hear all your stories original.gif

#17 chevbrock

Posted 09 February 2013 - 10:56 AM

The great thing about having a teenage dog is that you will be prepared for when you have a teenage human! Although with the human there is about three times more chewing  rolleyes.gif

Best of luck, and work with your dog EVERY DAY, not just dog-school day.

#18 PurpleNess

Posted 09 February 2013 - 01:01 PM

Everything! Dogs are the best at giving unconditional love and companionship - that's all you need to know in a nutshell. Every ounce of effort you put into training & bonding will come back to you 100 fold

Pop bub in a carrier & get down to your local training club & start now. Great advice from everyone. You need to learn how to be a good doggie parent, tough with the timming but I'm sure you've realised that massive booboo, now to make the best of it. Training, training, training! Oh & excerciis - once or twice a day to help with the destruction & boredom

Also suggest a few Kong type treat balls for when you are not home etc.

Dogs are awesome & I can't wait to get one when my DS is a couple of years older.


#19 Tessied

Posted 09 February 2013 - 01:06 PM

Not that is always true,  but my son is 2 years old and has been around dogs since day 1.  He is amazing around them and now all animals.  He's so gentle and calm around them.  He learned first to play ball with the dogs, and so easily plays with others as well.   I do think it fosters empathy and respect for all animals, as long as toddler and dogs are both treated well by the parents.

His half sister is also very into dogs and also a very empathetic kid.

I also grew up with dogs and I loved it.  I met my OH through dogs!  We have four now original.gif

#20 Gloriana

Posted 09 February 2013 - 01:45 PM

I grew up with little dogs until I was 12yrs old. When I was 12yrs old my older sister bought around this gorgeous puppy and I begged my parents to let me keep her. She was a Rhodesian ridgeback someone had dumped. She was my best friend. Slept in bed with me every night. Protected me when my brother had a party and this strange guy came into my room  mad.gif .
Up until she came I was not really into dogs. Damn yappy, biting little things. I still hate little dogs and I am more scare of them than bigger dogs.
Anyway my dad would not let me take Trace when I felt home to move in with DH and far enough she was happy there and was there from a puppy until she died.

Now we own two big dogs. One is a Goldy X Samoyed and the other a pure breed Goldy. Would not be without them and DD loves them. DD is best friends with the younger one. The older one who is 13yrs this April prefers to just lay around and not do alot.

When we first got the 13yr old as a puppy we were struggling with TTC and she was our first baby. And she cried at night and I was sure we could not cope with a baby but I think she helped. She is still our "Pupples".




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