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WDYT is better for health - low fat or full fat dairy?


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#1 Mumto1feral

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:21 PM

I'm so confused about the health information out there. For years I have been having low fat milk, low fat yoghurt and margarine thinking it was the healthier option for health given many health organisations in Australia such as the heart foundation recommends these products. But since having some health issues, I have doing more reading and many other nutritionists and books are saying full fat and butter is actually better for you. So now I'm confused and don't know what I should be doing? What are your thoughts? Do you think full fat is better? Has anyone made the switch and felt better for it?

#2 weepingangel

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:23 PM

Full fat here. You just need to read the nutritional labels to note that at times sugar etc increases in the low fat versions.

I use full fat natural yoghurt, full fat jersey milk. Most other products i don't use anymore since going sugar free and primal/paleo.

Oh and yes to butter, proper stuff though original.gif

Edited by pukeko~ponga~tree, 07 February 2013 - 01:25 PM.


#3 Guest_divineM_*

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:24 PM

full fat here...in moderation of course. and don't start me on margerine - it's just a cocktail of chemicals.

#4 9ferals

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:25 PM

Hell, I'm confused too.

I think it's worth stepping back and looking at your overall diet, not individual foods.

Do you eat a range of different foods with some fat, some carbs, some protein? (and for me, some treats although not everyone will feel these have a place in a healthy diet!)

You do need to have some fat in your diet - but it doesn't have to come from diary.

If you feel as though you aren't getting much fat at all, then adding in full fat dairy won't hurt.

If you eat cheese, avocado, oily fish like salmon, meat with some fat etc then sticking with lower fat options sounds fine to me.

#5 *LucyE*

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:26 PM

I've always been a full fat person.

As much as I like 'processed' foods such as cheese, butter etc, I prefer them to be minimally processed. So, we don't use margarine, or low fat milk or hydrogenated fats etc. if I'm going to eat ice cream, it will be made from dairy and not some 'iced confectionary' that is passed off as ice cream these days.

#6 Ice Queen

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:28 PM

I am not a dietician but I am slim (ish!) and healthy.  I havent ever had my cholestrol checked so I there is no way I am saying either is right or wrong.

I am a bit anti checmicals, additives etc.  I want to eat food from plants and animals not a factory.  Therefore I eat butter, not marg, and for the most part full fat products.  My only exception is milk as I don't like the taste of full fat milk.  I just eat these lovely yummy full fat products in moderation.  

For me, everything in moderation is the key to a healthy and happy diet.

#7 glasnost

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:30 PM

We are a full-fat family however recently I started using light (not skim) milk in my porridge instead of full-fat. Not only does the taste suffer (it is unsuprisingly less creamy) but I also feel that it doesn't keep me as full for as long as the full fat stuff. I feel like I need to eat more to fill up.

I am generally very suspicious of any kind of reduced fat product.

#8 4kidlets

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:32 PM

You can get low fat ice cream which is still made from dairy.

I dont think there is one answer to which is better for you though - from a weight loss POV low fat milk and margarine would be better, and there is no added sugar in low fat milk.
Low fat yogurt you do need to watch out for extra sugar.

But for someone who is not trying to lose weight or who needs to gain weight or is struggling with sufficient calorie intake, then full fat would be better.

For many people in between it probably doesnt really matter.

#9 ~chiquita~

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:32 PM

Full fat milk and butter user here and although I don't feel any different, I haven't put on any weight since making the change.

I think in moderation it's fine. I may however put on a kilo or two from the ridiculous amount of hot milo I drink during winter. Ya know, cos I'm cold. ph34r.gif

#10 *LucyE*

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:33 PM

QUOTE
If you feel as though you aren't getting much fat at all, then adding in full fat dairy won't hurt.

If you eat cheese, avocado, oily fish like salmon, meat with some fat etc then sticking with lower fat options sounds fine to me.

Full fat milk is approx 4%. Skim is approx 2% fat. There's only a 2% difference!  

I would rather have less full fat milk than the more processed, sugar laden alternative.

The difference is neglible between ordering a full fat cappuccino rather than a skinny latte.  

There's also the difference between fats. Not all fats are the same or 'good' for you. Monounsaturated fats are 'better' for you than saturated fats. Don't even get me started on trans fats. You can't substitute one for another (in foods) and expect them to be the same in the body.

#11 Froger

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:33 PM

I swapped to full fat some years ago. I have lost heaps of weight and now all my food actually tastes nice! Will never go back to low fat ever.

#12 PrincessPeach

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:34 PM

From reading labels & researching for milk itself, low-fat or no-fat is the best.

However yoghurt - full-fat all the way. It has significantly less added sugar to it.

In saying that I still use full cream milk. I recall reading somewhere that it is better to have full-cream dairy during your reproductive years - if you can tolerate it.

#13 bikingbubs

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:35 PM

Full fat.  The fat % is marginal, but low fat has way more sugar (and far less taste!).

#14 *LucyE*

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:38 PM

QUOTE
I dont think there is one answer to which is better for you though - from a weight loss POV low fat milk and margarine would be better

There are some who would disagree with that line of thinking. The theory is that the 'processed' foods confuse the body and doesn't allow the normal messages to be sent to the brain which can give the feeling of hunger or cravings even though the body does not require the calories for energy. This causes more consumption than is required, which is not helpful when trying to lose weight.

#15 amabanana

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:39 PM

We eat full fat here.  I'd rather eat less of something delicious than something processed and full of fillers and stablisers etc.  We don't eat marg.  Organic butter all the way here.  Mmmmm tasty.

#16 CallMeFeral

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:44 PM

I go full fat. I think it just involves less tampering, in general. And from my recent reading, the fat makes you feel satiated earlier, so you don't have the same quantity of it anyway.

Also low fat often substitutes with sugar, to cover up the worse taste, and sugar is WAY worse for you - gets transformed straight into fat anyway, but without satiation messages. BAD. The other day the full fat mayo was like 3% sugar - and the low fat mayo was 22% sugar - WTF? One fifth of that jar was pure sugar - just to make up for having less fat. That's not good for you!

#17 boatiebabe

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:44 PM

I (and the faily) all eat full fat.

I like my yoghurt around 10% fat!

We eat butter also. Everything is eaten in moderation and I cook most things from scratch. There is very little processed food in our house.

I avoid sugar as much as possible. I actually think sugar is a huge health threat and fat is ok. I limit myself to sugar but I find my body can only take so much fat before I'm full to bursting.

We are all slim and healthy - I recently had a barrage of tests and the doctor told me I was the healthiest 44year old he'd ever seen. LOL!

#18 Guest_Dinah_Harris_*

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:50 PM

Full fat here too.  We eat a very low sugar diet.  Many low fat products have extra sugar to make them taste better (yet still pretty bad compared to the FF).  Fat fills you up and lets your brain acknowledge that your stomach is full.  Sugar suppresses satiation, causing over-eating.  I'm another who thinks sugar is the tool of the devil and poor old fat has been getting all the blame!
We also stay away from plant oils except olive oil and coconut oil.

ETA:  The Heart Foundation has given a tick to the Nestle Fruit Fix Snack Bar which is 72% sugar.  So just because it has a Heart Foundation tick does not mean that it is healthy, at all.

Edited by Dinah_Harris, 07 February 2013 - 01:57 PM.


#19 Jane F. Jetson

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:55 PM

I find that low fat doesn't provide the taste or satiety full-fat does, and so leaves me feeling still kind of munchy - whereas full-fat in moderation is more satisfying.

If I eat low-fat I tend to eat more to compensate for the above, which is not ideal given that it's so often full of sugar.

I am also suspicious of anything that's been too highly tampered with, particularly margarines (yuck, the way that's made is vile).

So full-fat all the way. Just not too much of it.

#20 Logical nonsense

Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:59 PM

Full fat for me & DP (no kids jet),
If you are intrested look up the way they make margarine its gross sick.gif
No way I want that on my sandwich.

Fat is not bad its the sugar that's making us fat, as PPs have said fat does help fill you up. The Atkins diet is sort of based on that, if you take away carbs (which will become sugar in your body) you need to add fat to feel full for longer.

I have notice if I have full fat dairy in my dinner I don't feel like I need cookies or lollies during the evening when I'm watching the TV.

#21 Bluenomi

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:01 PM

I prefer full fat since it tastes nicer. Plus DD and I together only go through 2 litres a week so it's not that much more fat.

#22 Guest_~Coffee~_*

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:09 PM

.

Edited by *SnowFlower*, 20 February 2013 - 04:55 PM.


#23 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:15 PM

We have regular milk and regular yoghurt, cheese and butter.  We prefer the taste and in my mind, it's less processed (probably isn't but that's how I think of it).  DH and I have noticed the kids don't eat as much yoghurt/cheese when we use the regular stuff as opposed to the low fat versions.

Pre kids, we used to regularly buy low fat dairy everything.  We swapped to regular when DD1 was a baby because it was recommended that babies/infants eat the full fat versions of dairy until the age of 2 before introducing low fat dairy.  We tried going back to low fat a couple of times, but everyone prefers the taste of the regular ones.

#24 gabbigirl

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:24 PM

Full fat everything here.  If not for general health, it's definitely better for my mental health...skim milk...yuk!  biggrin.gif

#25 Feraldadathome

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:29 PM

Full fat milk is over 96% fat free ( original.gif ) and tastes better to me, so happy to have it. Yoghurt we prefer full-fat, but are not consistent, although we do check sugar content. We use Mainland Buttersoft, mostly so it's spreadable, but it also has slightly less fat by volume,. simply by the aeration process.




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