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Working Mum - up to 15hrs p/w


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#1 BeYOUtiful

Posted 06 February 2013 - 02:42 PM

Do you consider someone a working Mum if they work up to 15hrs per week (averaging 12hrs)?

Someone mentioned in conversation the other day along the lines of me not really being a working Mum.
They then backpeddled and said the way they said it didn't come out right.
Either way I wasn't really offended, however would still consider myself a working Mum??



#2 B-B-M

Posted 06 February 2013 - 02:48 PM

How odd. Yes i'd say you were a "working mum". You have kids - you're a mum. You have a job - you're working.

Some people are weird.

#3 msro82

Posted 06 February 2013 - 02:53 PM

Some people are weird!

I work 32hrs per week, but I am no where near full time apparently! I am only 6 he's short of full time.....

#4 Natttmumm

Posted 06 February 2013 - 02:57 PM

Yes for sure.
You work part time

#5 Alacritous~Andy

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:01 PM

Unless you a working more than 15 hrs a week, you don't meet the work requirements for Centrelink to receive Child Care Benefit.

Which absolutely sucks when get offered 2 days a week work, when the work day is a standard 7 1/4 hrs.  Yep. Half an hour short of qualifying.

#6 TillyTake2

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:02 PM

I guess there are "grades" to an extent (at least in my mind). I work one day a week, 8hrs. I personally don't really consider myself a working mum. I don't find I have to juggle things the way I imagine a "working mum" does so I guess that's why I feel that way. My life is much more in line with a sahm than a working mum when I compare to my friends on both sides. I don't really mind either way, but now that I think about it I kind of see the point.

#7 BeYOUtiful

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:20 PM

Yep, that's why I asked.  original.gif
I first went back to work when he was 7.5mths - 2 days per week (16hrs).
I left home at 6.30am and home at 6.00pm.

Now that I am home until 3.30pm (and usually home from work on average 8.30pm) I notice differing comments - from my partner and the other day our hairdresser.
It sure beats all the travel I did before (3hrs a day) and they are great hours.  3hrs a night but most nights end up with 1hr OT sometimes more.
Next week for example I am rostered on Tues/Wed/Thurs/Sat/Sun.  So it feels like I am working more because it is spread out over more days.

Anyhow was just curious.

#8 FeralFP

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:27 PM

It would probably depend on the context of the conversation.

When I read the term "working mums" in articles I usually assume they are talking about women working 3 or more days per week as we usually talk about "working mum"s in terms of the struggles they face unique to their situation which I don't think parents working significantly less hours tend to have.

When I was working two days a week I identified a lot more with SAHP's than working parents as I didnt have the same stresses every single day about juggling the house, work and drop/off pick up committments that I do as a full timer.

In the reverse situation if I read an article about SAHM's in my head that includes those who work 1-2 days per week as they are home the majority of their week.

ETA: I think I tend to look at it as how many days a week rather than how many hours. So if you work 10 hours but its all in one day I'd be leaning towards not calling them a working mum. If they work 10 hours over 4 or 5 days a week I'd probably think of them more of a working mum

Edited by JBaby, 06 February 2013 - 03:34 PM.


#9 WibbleWobble

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:39 PM

QUOTE (Alacritous~Andy @ 06/02/2013, 04:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Unless you a working more than 15 hrs a week, you don't meet the work requirements for Centrelink to receive Child Care Benefit.

Which absolutely sucks when get offered 2 days a week work, when the work day is a standard 7 1/4 hrs.  Yep. Half an hour short of qualifying.


You should still be entitled to 24hrs of child care benefit as long as you are using approved care. Working more than 15 hrs entitles you up to 50hrs, which is what you would miss out on by half an hour.

As to the OP, I work 15hrs a week and consider myself a part time working mum. Given my work involves me being away two days a week DH and I still have to juggle to make things work.

Edited by WibbleWobble, 06 February 2013 - 03:40 PM.


#10 niggles

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:43 PM

I work a 19 hour week and have always thought of myself as a part time working mother, when I need a box anyway.

#11 BeYOUtiful

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:44 PM

Yes I think I am more on the spectrum of SAHM.
Although i think i preferred 2 full days done and dusted as opposed to higgildey piggeldey hours spread out over 5 days.
But we don't need childcare so a huge bonus.





#12 SUSIE25

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:50 PM

I work full time. But i only get paid for the part time hours I am officially employed for. The rest is unpaid . i dont clock off once I get home  wink.gif

If you arent a working mum, what are you?

#13 BronR

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:54 PM

I work 3 days per week (or 21 hours).

If someone asks me if I am a working Mum I answer that I work part time.

When I hear or read about "working Mums" I tend to assume full time work, I guess because I see full time working Mums have different struggles to me. But I certainly "work" so technically I am a working Mum.  biggrin.gif



#14 BeYOUtiful

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:58 PM

QUOTE
I work full time. But i only get paid for the part time hours I am officially employed for

Aint that the truth.  I get home, scoff dinner and most nights have to get my son to bed or out of bed with his dad and in to his bed - when he sometimes wakes.  Then do the dishes and the midnight wake ups of late.


Yep PP I say part time too.  It was the not a working Mum comment that made me think.  Perhaps she meant not full time.

#15 Missy Shelby

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:58 PM

Absolutely, I think if you get paid then you are a working mum.

I don't think it really matters if you work 10, 12, 22 or 38 hours per week, working is working.

#16 Julie3Girls

Posted 06 February 2013 - 04:41 PM

QUOTE
Unless you a working more than 15 hrs a week, you don't meet the work requirements for Centrelink to receive Child Care Benefit.

Which absolutely sucks when get offered 2 days a week work, when the work day is a standard 7 1/4 hrs. Yep. Half an hour short of qualifying.

Everyone gets 24hrs of CCB, regardless of working status.
And the 50% rebate only requires you to be working/training/studying, no minimum hours, so you would qualify for it as well.

To me, part-time work is the ideal situation original.gif Best of both worlds. I work school hours 3 days a week. As far as my girls are concerned, I'm a sahm, because I'm always home when they are. And I get the benefits of working as well.

#17 tibs

Posted 06 February 2013 - 04:58 PM

QUOTE (Julie3Girls @ 06/02/2013, 05:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Everyone gets 24hrs of CCB, regardless of working status.
And the 50% rebate only requires you to be working/training/studying, no minimum hours, so you would qualify for it as well.

To me, part-time work is the ideal situation original.gif Best of both worlds. I work school hours 3 days a week. As far as my girls are concerned, I'm a sahm, because I'm always home when they are. And I get the benefits of working as well.


My kids do preschool where there is a work study test for the (meagre) CCB that they pay.  When I was working I worked 2 full days a week but the official work hours were 7 hours a day so I didn't meet the work study test.  And of course there is no CCR for preschools so lose out there too.

#18 strawberrycakes

Posted 06 February 2013 - 06:26 PM

I work 4 hours a day 5 days a week, I consider myself to be a working mother but have had quite a few people scoff at me & say that I have it so easy & it's more like a holiday  huh.gif

#19 Jane Jetson

Posted 06 February 2013 - 07:12 PM

I figure if you're in paid work, you're a working mum.

QUOTE (~*Twilight~Zone*~ @ 06/02/2013, 06:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How come we don't talk about working dads?


I must *not* eat bait, I must not eat bait...  biggrin.gif

#20 JRA

Posted 06 February 2013 - 07:13 PM

Firstly, why does it matter that much?

A few have said unless you work more than X hours or Y days you aren't because you don't face the "struggles" of a working mum. The number of hours a mum works is only part of that equation. Do they have a partner? Does their partner work?  Do they have a mother or father that does all the care of the children when at work? Do they work at night, when their partner is home looking  after the children.

I don't think having "struggles" of a working mother is a judge of whether you work.

It is also about context. What is the discussion about? Do you earn money? Do you need childcare?  Do you you have to deal with a boss who p*sses you off.

People spend a lot  of time worrying about labels, why?

#21 lclb

Posted 06 February 2013 - 07:25 PM

I work 15 hours a week over 2 days. I consider myself a working mother.

I feel like I am lucky enough to have the best of both worlds, 3 days a week at home with my kids and 2 days using the knowledge and skills I went to University to gain and financially contributing to our household.

#22 Guest_LeChatNinjah_*

Posted 06 February 2013 - 07:48 PM

If I had to go with a label I'd go with PT working mum in that situation, I guess.



#23 Beancat

Posted 06 February 2013 - 07:55 PM

QUOTE (Alacritous~Andy @ 06/02/2013, 04:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Unless you a working more than 15 hrs a week, you don't meet the work requirements for Centrelink to receive Child Care Benefit.

Which absolutely sucks when get offered 2 days a week work, when the work day is a standard 7 1/4 hrs.  Yep. Half an hour short of qualifying.



yes but you can add other things to this to get the 15 hours.  Ie if you volunteer in any capacity (ie listen to reading at school counts,or being ona parent commitee) or if you are looking for work or studying as well.  it all adds up

QUOTE (Alacritous~Andy @ 06/02/2013, 04:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Unless you a working more than 15 hrs a week, you don't meet the work requirements for Centrelink to receive Child Care Benefit.

Which absolutely sucks when get offered 2 days a week work, when the work day is a standard 7 1/4 hrs.  Yep. Half an hour short of qualifying.



yes but you can add other things to this to get the 15 hours.  Ie if you volunteer in any capacity (ie listen to reading at school counts,or being ona parent commitee) or if you are looking for work or studying as well.  it all adds up

#24 RainyDays

Posted 06 February 2013 - 07:58 PM

Honestly, if I heard the term 'working mum' I'd assume full time without further information.

I wouldn't disagree that you are a working mum though.

FWIW I always stay I'm a SAHM, though technically I'm studying part time, I do spend pretty much all day parenting, and squeezing the study into spare hours of the evening and the odd all weekend cram.

#25 Freddie'sMum

Posted 06 February 2013 - 07:59 PM

I'm a part time working Mum.

I work 3 days a week - so 21 hours and am home 2 days a week.

I sure as eggs qualify to think of myself as a employee / worker because on those 3 days at work - I squash in at least 4 days worth of work !!






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