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Terrified of getting a pouch!


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#1 mummmi79

Posted 05 February 2013 - 06:25 PM

Hello fellow mummies

I am unsure wether to
Go Vbac or Csection for this little one.
I have heard stories of ladies getting what they call a Joey pouch after consecutive sections and I really don't like that idea! However due to a few personal reasons I'm also swaying away from a vbac.
Has anyone ended up with this pouch after their sections?
And does anyone know if they have to use staples instead of stitches second time around?

#2 B.feral3

Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:19 PM

I've had 2 C/S's. (DS2 & DS3)
I do have the dreaded pouch now and I did have staples the second time round actually!! Only because that particular hospital prefers staples to stitches though apparently and I had my C/S's in different hospitals.

Good luck with your decision.

Edited by Bek+3, 05 February 2013 - 07:20 PM.


#3 Glr-r

Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:22 PM

I've had 2 and no pouch, glued together first time, stappled the 2nd.

#4 Beancat

Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:29 PM

I've had two and a slight pouch.  I am having a third in 12 weeks.  Would rather the pouch anyday of the week than the risks that come with VBAC.

First one was stiched, second one was glue.  Hope this one will be glue.  Oh and my ob removed some of the scar tissue from the first when she did the second so there was not as much scar tissue and she plans to do the same again this time

#5 KatakaGeoGirl

Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:33 PM

You mean the saggy baggy dead tissue tummy bit that sits over the c-section scar? Yep I have one. Didn't for first DD but then did for 2nd DD. I am also numb most of the area, I think I lost nerve feeling around it. Its hideous lol - I just pull my knickers over it and try squeeze my tummy in. I loved my old flat tummy but nothing I can do - I guess to look on the positives I'd rather have my daughter than my saggy tummy, than not have her and have a flat tummy. I didn't want to go the risks of VBac.

I also think you can get that without a c-section anyway?

#6 DandS

Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:34 PM

Ive had 3 c/s. No pouch after 2 ... but #3 was the one that caused all the damage. Very depressing!

ETA: cant really remember whether it was staples or stitches...

Edited by DandS, 05 February 2013 - 07:35 PM.


#7 bikingbubs

Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:35 PM

I had an emergency c/s with DS and was hoping to have a VBAC with DD, but ended up having a c/s.  Although she is only 3 months old, its not too pouchy so think it will go back to how it was after DS.  Had stitches both times.   Personally, I wouldnt be terrified of ending up with one as long as your kids are born healthy.

#8 GenWhy

Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:42 PM

I got the pouch after my c/sections. I had a VBAC too but the damage was already done in the first pregnancy. I'd take the VBAC any day over those horrid caesareans. Much less risky to have a VBAC than a repeat caesar by the way

#9 FeralFemboside

Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:51 PM

QUOTE (GenWhy @ 05/02/2013, 07:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Much less risky to have a VBAC than a repeat caesar by the way


This study says differently:

Methods and findings
2,345 women with one prior caesarean, eligible for VBAC at term, were recruited from 14 Australian maternity hospitals. Women were assigned by patient preference (n = 2,323) or randomisation (n = 22) to planned VBAC (1,225 patient preference, 12 randomised) or planned ERC (1,098 patient preference, ten randomised). The primary outcome was risk of fetal death or death of liveborn infant before discharge or serious infant outcome. Data were analysed for the 2,345 women (100%) and infants enrolled.

The risk of fetal death or liveborn infant death prior to discharge or serious infant outcome was significantly lower for infants born in the planned ERC group compared with infants in the planned VBAC group (0.9% versus 2.4%; relative risk [RR] 0.39; 95% CI 0.19–0.80; number needed to treat to benefit 66; 95% CI 40–200). Fewer women in the planned ERC group compared with women in the planned VBAC had a major haemorrhage (blood loss ≥1,500 ml and/or blood transfusion), (0.8% [9/1,108] versus 2.3% [29/1,237]; RR 0.37; 95% CI 0.17–0.80).

Edited by Sydneyside, 05 February 2013 - 07:57 PM.


#10 threetimesblessed

Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:25 PM

3 csections, no pouch, stitches each time, very neat scar.
Once a colleague asked me if I had a pouch from the csections.
I had no idea what she was talking about and had never heard of it until then!

#11 GenWhy

Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:33 PM

Sudneyside, the studies on a MUCH larger scale have been done worldwide. They all have proven that Caesars carry more risk. That is why ACOG changed their guidelines in 2010 recommending women attempt VBAC and VBA2C rather than elective caesareans. I can google too but prefer to get my info from actual medical journals

#12 melajoe

Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:39 PM

I have had two c/s (1st was emergency, 2nd was failed VBAC), with stitches both times.  Actually, I think the second time I only had internal stitches and tape on the outside.  I do have a bit of a pouch after the second.  I was pretty happy with the way things bounced back after the first, but my youngest is now 2.5 and I still look about 4-5 months pregnant on a good day.  I'm not big anywhere else but I just can't get rid of the saggy tum.

Shapewear is my friend.



Edited by melajoe, 05 February 2013 - 08:44 PM.


#13 B.feral3

Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:43 PM

QUOTE (GenWhy @ 05/02/2013, 08:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Sudneyside, the studies on a MUCH larger scale have been done worldwide. They all have proven that Caesars carry more risk. That is why ACOG changed their guidelines in 2010 recommending women attempt VBAC and VBA2C rather than elective caesareans. I can google too but prefer to get my info from actual medical journals


I'm not getting involved in a debate but I had a read and just wanted to say that that was an 'actual' medical journal.  unsure.gif


#14 beaglebaby

Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:50 PM

1 emergency c section, 2 VBACs, nasty, nasty pouch.  Might also have something to do with the amount of weight I gained and have now lost.  No amount of shapewear is going to help as you have to put it somewhere!  Think I should start saving for a tummy tuck!

#15 katiecoop

Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:55 PM

QUOTE (GenWhy @ 05/02/2013, 09:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Sudneyside, the studies on a MUCH larger scale have been done worldwide. They all have proven that Caesars carry more risk. That is why ACOG changed their guidelines in 2010 recommending women attempt VBAC and VBA2C rather than elective caesareans. I can google too but prefer to get my info from actual medical journals


Agreed. The risk of a vbac (uterine rupture) is tiny (although severe) compared to the much higher risk of subjecting a child to a lifetime of compromised health, asthma, allergies, food allergies, diabetes. That's without even considering that women and babies in Australia are twice as likely to die in c section than in a natural birth... Or the higher likelihood of bleeding, infections, etc in the mother. I was born via c section and have had a baby via c section and I wouldn't wish it on any child.
I'm not sure a pouch is the most important thing to consider, but if you don't want a saggy pouch probably best to avoid the c section if possible. The right part of my stomach above the scar is much saggier than the left side of my stomach if that's any help.

#16 FeralFemboside

Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:58 PM

QUOTE (Bek+3 @ 05/02/2013, 08:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm not getting involved in a debate but I had a read and just wanted to say that that was an 'actual' medical journal.  unsure.gif


Yes, and it was done since 2010 and in Australian hospitals... I'm not arguing that a single small study is definitive, but obviously more research is warranted because I don't think the question as to which is safer overall has actually been answered. To me there seems to be good evidence for both VBAC and ERC.

#17 *Finn*

Posted 05 February 2013 - 09:17 PM

I have a pouch.

1 c-section (stitches)
1 Vbac

It totally feels like dead flesh. I can't stand it.

#18 Future-Xmas-elf

Posted 05 February 2013 - 09:34 PM

Off topic, educational musing follows:
QUOTE (GenWhy @ 05/02/2013, 08:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I can google too but prefer to get my info from actual medical journals

PLOS medicine is a peer reviewed journal with an impact factor of over 16. You can't get more 'actual'
And one of the most important factors of using evidence in medicine is the ability to apply it in context. You don't get better than a study looking at Australian Hospitals with Australian practice standards and Australian patients from only 2 years ago as far as context goes. So really, it is actually more helpful than a study with a a larger sample size, that was carried out in China or the US.

On topic :
One emergency caeser here and a small overhang. Wouldn't call it a pouch though.

#19 Expelliarmus

Posted 05 February 2013 - 09:49 PM

I googled some images of a csection pouch.

Dude, I look like that and I've had 3 vaginal births!

Are we sure it's a csection thing?!? LOL

#20 B.feral3

Posted 05 February 2013 - 10:04 PM

QUOTE (Sydneyside @ 05/02/2013, 08:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yes, and it was done since 2010 and in Australian hospitals... I'm not arguing that a single small study is definitive, but obviously more research is warranted because I don't think the question as to which is safer overall has actually been answered. To me there seems to be good evidence for both VBAC and ERC.


I'm not getting into that debate. I'm just saying it was an actual, peer reviewed journal article. That's the only point I was addressing.  wink.gif

Edited by Bek+3, 05 February 2013 - 10:05 PM.


#21 *little-rach*

Posted 05 February 2013 - 10:05 PM

Three c/sections here, 1 emerg. And 2 elective.

First and third were staples, second internal stitches.

No pouch at all but I have lost most feeling in the area.

#22 tres-chic

Posted 05 February 2013 - 10:10 PM

I've had two c-sections, after my first natural birth.

I bounced back well after the first c-section but did have a pouch I suppose after the second. I was glue, not stitches or staples.

I was able to exercise it off about 90%. Not perfect but not a fait accompli either.

#23 VeritasVinum

Posted 05 February 2013 - 10:12 PM

Flat as a tack around where my three cs took place (third was a good decision as uterus nearly ruptured at 36w3d delivery - had been offered choice of trying VBA2C or cs as originally booked when I went into labour).

Now two inches above that I have saggy droopy skin. That is just pregnancy related and not to do with cs.

Edit for Damn Autocorrect

Edited by lsolaBella, 07 February 2013 - 10:14 AM.


#24 Havanese

Posted 05 February 2013 - 10:36 PM

QUOTE (katiecoop @ 05/02/2013, 09:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Agreed. The risk of a vbac (uterine rupture) is tiny (although severe) compared to the much higher risk of subjecting a child to a lifetime of compromised health, asthma, allergies, food allergies, diabetes. That's without even considering that women and babies in Australia are twice as likely to die in c section than in a natural birth... Or the higher likelihood of bleeding, infections, etc in the mother.


Really???  rolleyes.gif  Can you please explain how a CS subjects the child to a lifetime of health complications?

#25 sakura73

Posted 06 February 2013 - 07:38 AM

QUOTE (katiecoop @ 05/02/2013, 09:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That's without even considering that women and babies in Australia are twice as likely to die in c section than in a natural birth... Or the higher likelihood of bleeding, infections, etc in the mother. I was born via c section and have had a baby via c section and I wouldn't wish it on any child.


I suspect those statistics are skewed by the fact that emergency caesareans are often performed in circumstances where the mother or baby is at life-threatening risk already.

And as for "not wishing it on any child" -  my child was born by emergency C-section. Had he not been he would have died trying to be born because he was completely tangled in the cord. I would not wish attempted vaginal delivery in those circumstances on any child.




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