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A question for mums of fussy children
Like really fussy, won't eat meat or veg types


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73 replies to this topic

#1 lafonda

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:33 AM

No hate please. Not giving him anything, force feeding and sending him to bed don't work.

I am curious what your really fussy children eat? I mean so fussy they won't even eat meat or vegetables. What do they eat in a day?

I am trying to making DS as healthy as possible, which is near impossible with the limited foods.

Yesterday he was at daycare, so there was no boredom snacking and he ate:

Bfast - Glass of milk (usually would be weetbix but didn't feel like any)
Mtea - Banana and apple (not sure how much, take a piece to share)
Lunch - Devon sandwich on wholemeal, 3-4 tablespoons of yoghurt
Atea - 5 plain rice crackers with some block tasty cheese on top, dozen grapes
Dinner - Bowl of spiral pasta, 1.5 sausages, grated cheese and bbq sauce

I spoke to our MCHN at our 4 year old healthy check in Dec and she said to not stress, it'll be a stage, eventually he will eat vegies.

I'm not even really sure what I am asking, I just need advice from other fussy eaters parents.

Thank you.


#2 Carmen02

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:38 AM

my 8yr old has had many years of extreme fussy eating and the biggest thing Ive learnt is multi vitamins stock up on those and give them to him that way his still getting some good things in him! my DSs diet is shocking have been told it is a major psychological thing he has to overcome with lots of help (went years without knowing he was coeliac) DS wont touch meat, any form of veggie on a rare occassion he will eat an apple but wont touch any diary food so no milk or yoghurt, wont touch pasta of any form! He will eat sausages, peanut butter sandwiches, sausage rolls and chips...that is all he eatl

#3 Bam1

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:38 AM

He looks like he eat a good variety of food (incl. meat) at daycare so is he only fussy at home?

Maybe ask the Daycare for some recipes as they are usually simple but nutritious. My daycare gave me a recipe for spag bog which normally my 5yo refuses to eat but absolutely loves.

#4 FeralBob!

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:39 AM

She's right it is a stage, and he will start eating a greater variety.

DD is nearly 6 and heading out of extreme fussiness - at one point she would not eat pasta with any sauce on it, just a small amount of salt. She also hated all veges, but is now happily eating peas, corn and carrot, and starting to enjoy small amounts of lettuce and broccoli. She refuses tomatoes, but I suspect that is a mild allergy issue rather than taste.

Just keep offering it. I found the best advice came from CBeebies - sniff it, lick it, give it a little nibble and just accept it if they don't like it after they've done that.

And keep up the fruit, something is better than nothing!

Good luck  original.gif

#5 lafonda

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:43 AM

Sorry I should have said, I packed that lunch for him at daycare.

He will eat those foods at home, but that is basically it.

I consider that fussy, maybe I'm become to stressed about it in the past 2 years.

#6 lafonda

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:46 AM

Thanks Wingbob - it's only been this year he decided to try pasta, and liked it, but will only have tomato or bbq sauce on it.

I fed him spag bol sauce one night and he could tell from the smell it wasn't right and nearly made himself sick.

Gosh I hope it is just a stage.

#7 Carmen02

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:46 AM

try not to stress original.gif Let food times be as stress free and uneventful as u can make it!

#8 CalEliKat

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:51 AM

QUOTE (lafonda @ 01/02/2013, 11:33 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
No hate please. Not giving him anything, force feeding and sending him to bed don't work.

I am curious what your really fussy children eat? I mean so fussy they won't even eat meat or vegetables. What do they eat in a day?

I am trying to making DS as healthy as possible, which is near impossible with the limited foods.

Yesterday he was at daycare, so there was no boredom snacking and he ate:

Bfast - Glass of milk (usually would be weetbix but didn't feel like any)
Mtea - Banana and apple (not sure how much, take a piece to share)
Lunch - Devon sandwich on wholemeal, 3-4 tablespoons of yoghurt
Atea - 5 plain rice crackers with some block tasty cheese on top, dozen grapes
Dinner - Bowl of spiral pasta, 1.5 sausages, grated cheese and bbq sauce

I spoke to our MCHN at our 4 year old healthy check in Dec and she said to not stress, it'll be a stage, eventually he will eat vegies.

I'm not even really sure what I am asking, I just need advice from other fussy eaters parents.

Thank you.


Seriously?  I would be pleased if my 8 year old ate any of what you have listed.  He eats NO MEAT at all and has not eaten any meat since he was 11 months old, he does not eat cheese, he does not drink milk, he does not eat any fruit except lemons and limes, he does not eat yoghurt, he does not eat pasta.

My son is extreme, he has been diagnosed with aspergers and will see an OT this year.  He eats white bread, chips, custard, lemons, limes, he loves vinegar, he will eat butter on his lunches but only at school.



#9 FeralBob!

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:53 AM

It is laugh.gif I would sit there and wonder what I had done to deserve a child that only wanted "just plain pasta please mummy, wiv lemon and salt" *headdesk* And in fairness, I will still serve sauce and pasta/rice seperately because she is not big on gravy or sauce of any kind, except tomato sauce. DD still hates bolognese sauce too. She will have a few mouthfuls, but really doesn't like it cluttering up her pasta, lol!

The other thing I had success with is making burgers, where hers will be a plain meat patty with tomato sauce and cheese on wholemeal bread. I also got success on the chicken eating front by giving her plain roast chicken with no skin and on a seperate plate some mashed potato, or plain oven baken salmon fillet. She's also fond of mash with peas and corn mixed through it.

#10 lafonda

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:53 AM

Do I feed him what he will eat for dinner every night? I.e sausage pasta bake, quiche and chicken kiev are the only dinnerish foods he would touch.

I think I am putting too much emphasis on the vegies.

Thanks everyone, I'll stress less and get a multiv into him

#11 CallMeFeral

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:54 AM

Mine are ridiculous. They only eat rice, omelette, carrot sticks, corn. DD will also have tuna, cheese, and sausages. DS will have vegemite. They both like apples.
Both would happily substitute with all manner of sweet food, biscuits and chips, so I don't make this available.

I just run with it, and give them some multivites every now and then. It's not worth making it a battle.

#12 butterflydreaming

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:56 AM

I also would be happy if my son ate what yours is.

The list of foods mine will currently eat is

Bananas
Strawberries
Spagetti with very little of the meat sauce
noodles
plain rice crackers
sultanas
garlic bread
yogurt (home made)
polony (sometimes)

I hate that he eats such crappy food when the rest of us eat wholefoods/whole grains and lots of fruit and vegetable. Everyday i make an effort to offer him something new or something he hasnt really tried and usualy get a 'mummy thats yucky' and refusal to even try it.

#13 Tall Poppy

Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:59 AM

I know many kids with a much more limited range than that. I'd not stress too much. In saying that though I'd still offer vegetables whenever you can.

My DD was/is fussy I've tried to find a happy medium & in that process I discovered she will tolerate some frozen veg, she likes the water logged taste I think. I was amazed, it was suggested to me by a speech therapist we were seeing. It's also so easy for me to prepare as an 'extra' as neither DH or I eat them we have fresh veg, which we offer her as well. It still isn't a huge volume but, better than nothing.

Our Paed also suggested dropping the whole thing & leaving her to eat as she pleases for a few months & then try again. Drop the agenda so to speak. My DH wasn't keen on this idea, I was keen though as I was sick of it. I ended up trying the frozen veg thing first & never moved on to this.

#14 JLC

Posted 01 February 2013 - 11:19 AM

I have a 6 year old fussy eating boy, he will only eat Chicken Nuggets, white bread, strawberry Jam, Juice, Sausages, Crackers. Sometimes a little bit of milk.  He will eat plain cakes. So no fruit or vegetables.  

Only the last couple months we have finally been having tiny little wins, he is now having fish (Flake) & he is slowly trying peas, its only like 2 of them, but its something.

I've been to a paed. & he just advised us to keep feeding him what he likes but other small amounts of other food, and it doesn't matter if he doesn't eat it.  I have found it so hard not to stress about it, but I've just been going with the flow & have found dinner times alot less stressful now.  I've also assured my son that if he tries it & really doesn't like it I won't make him eat it again so that has really helped too. I think its his way of having some control still.

Hope any of my experiences has helped.  I just always have my fingers crossed that he will realise food actually tastes pretty darn good wink.gif  I also give him multi-vitamins.

#15 Ianthe

Posted 01 February 2013 - 11:25 AM

By fussy do you mean he doesn't eat much, or that he doesn't tend to like healthy food? What he is eating seems an adequate amount of food and could be a lot worse.

You have posted his weight here before, you said daycare meant he wasn't mindlessly snacking, does that mean he does on days he is home and then doesn't eat dinner? If that is a normal days food I am wondering if he has had any tests done to figure out why he is heavy?

#16 lafonda

Posted 01 February 2013 - 11:44 AM

By fussy I mean won't try any other foods. Will over eat on those if he is allowed.

Would live on hot chips and gravy if allowed.

He has just had 6 weeks of holidays, and all I heard the entire time was "muuum, I am hungry", we really had to distract him constantly to stop him from just snacking.



#17 harper_

Posted 01 February 2013 - 11:51 AM

We give our kids what we eat, if they don't eat it (which is very rare) they go hungry. Kids are always going to want to eat salty or sugary things and prefer them over say vegetables or salad or fish. The key is to not give them an option. As long as they know an option exists you're fighting an uphill battle.

Edited by harper_, 01 February 2013 - 11:55 AM.


#18 BadCat

Posted 01 February 2013 - 12:00 PM

With my DS we made a list of meals that he would eat and posted it on the fridge.  He had to eat anything he was given off that list without fuss.

Then if I would put one thing on the plate that he didn't eat with the requirement that he must take a bite of it.  He found it was easier to take a single bite than to fight about it.  Once in a while he would come across another thing we could put on his list of foods.

When we didn't want to have one of his preferred meals we made whatever dinner we liked.  We inisisted that he taste everything on the plate and then if he didn't like it he could have a sandwich instead.

Eventually there were enough things on the list and he was so used to trying whatever we put in front of him that he now eats a reasonable variety and is not overly squeamish about trying new things.

He was maybe 4 or 5 when we started doing that though.  It was a tedious process but it stopped the arguments over food for the most part.  It was full on for maybe 6 months and then tapered off over a few months until we didn't need the list anymore.

Edited by BadCat, 01 February 2013 - 12:04 PM.


#19 CalEliKat

Posted 01 February 2013 - 12:08 PM

QUOTE (harper_ @ 01/02/2013, 12:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We give our kids what we eat, if they don't eat it (which is very rare) they go hungry. Kids are always going to want to eat salty or sugary things and prefer them over say vegetables or salad or fish. The key is to not give them an option. As long as they know an option exists you're fighting an uphill battle.


Yay, so simple.  I will just do this with my Aspergers child and deal with the vomiting, the melting down and the starving of himself.  Thankyou, I never realised how simple the solution was.  



#20 Rosepickles

Posted 01 February 2013 - 12:20 PM

I think it sounds ok OP. My daughter eats a similar range of foods and will also not touch pasta if it has anything on it, but loves plain pasta.

I try to give her things that she previously didnt like every now and then. Would you believe, a few weeks ago she started eating broccoli again! I also try to give her some vegies/healthy dinner things first, sometimes she might eat a bit because she is hungry. Then later, I will give her what I know she likes so she doesn't go hungry.

Could you get some vegies into him with things like muffins?

#21 Lucygoosey1

Posted 01 February 2013 - 12:21 PM

My DD is not only fussy,  but she has a very small appetite.  She is very skinny.  I do pressure her to eat,  but only things she likes.

Breakfast:  half a piece of toast with vegemite,  or I've been trying sandwiches as I can get her to eat more.
Morning tea: 2 crackers or a couple of slices of tinned peach
Lunch:  toasted cheese sandwich (or as little as a half)
Dinner:  half a sausage,  piece of potato,  perhaps a few pieces of carrot or corn
          Or. Plain pasta or rice or noodles.  (no sauce)
          3 chicken nuggets or a fish finger.
          Plain milk

She will occasionally eat cut up ham.  But NEVER anything like a casserole,  sauce etc.  Never any meats like roasts.  won't eat eggs in any form.  Eats sweets but still only a bite of a plain cake.  

I set one challenge a week.  This week is to try breakfast cereal.  I've managed to get her onto cheerios.
I get too 'over it' as I've been trying new things for 2.5yrs.  She has multivitamins daily.

My DD2 is 1.5yrs old and eats anything and everything.  She even had Thai green curry the other day and loved it.  

I feel very sad when people say,  just dish it up & they will eat.  My DD just loses weight sad.gif  







#22 FeralCrazyMum

Posted 01 February 2013 - 12:24 PM

DS has a very limited diet but his paed did blood tests and all his results were fine. He said not to worry about it and just feed him what he will eat. Having said that, DS doesn't eat lollies, chocolate, most junk food (he will eat a Happy Meal of nuggets and chips) and only drinks water or milk.

So he eats:

Weetbix with milk and pureed fruit (Goulburn Valley or similar)
Toasted cheese sandwiches
Yoghurt with pureed fruit
Steak
Lamb chops
Baked potato (no butter or anything)
Broccoli (occasionally)

Basically, a very bland, boring diet. Very rarely, new things get added, popcorn is a recent addition.


#23 harper_

Posted 01 February 2013 - 12:34 PM

QUOTE (kerrie23 @ 01/02/2013, 01:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yay, so simple.  I will just do this with my Aspergers child and deal with the vomiting, the melting down and the starving of himself.  Thankyou, I never realised how simple the solution was.


Oh grow up. rolleyes.gif

Obviously what I said was not applicable to kids with actual health issues FFS

#24 CalEliKat

Posted 01 February 2013 - 12:43 PM

What about what you said before your edit?  That was pretty interesting and so well informed.

#25 CalEliKat

Posted 01 February 2013 - 12:46 PM

QUOTE (Madame Protart @ 01/02/2013, 01:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Actually what you said was not applicable to ANY kid with food issues.  

You've obviously never had a kid who is truly 'fussy'.  We are not talking about a fussy stage all toddlers go through.  We're talking about kids who will go to bed hungry, who will eat the bare minimum to survive, rather than eat what is on offer.  Do you not think it would have occurred to us to say "here's dinner, eat it or go hungry"?  Of course we've tried that.


Thanks for that Madame Protart.  Answers such as Harper's drive me batty.  I had to cave before my son did because he ate nothing for 5 days when I tried the method she suggested (prior to his diagnosis).  Heartbreaking to watch them fade away before your eyes.  Clearly though we should just grow up though and keep starving them until they eat.




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