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Delaying vaccinations
What did you do and why?


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14 replies to this topic

#1 OnTheJourney

Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:29 AM

I'm not sure if I have put this in the correct forum, and I know this can be a heated topic - I am just looking for information please.

For those who in recent years have delayed or selectively given vaccinations, what did you do and why did you make those decisions? I am trying to make some decisions for my DS.


Thank you

#2 Imaginary friend

Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:51 AM

Why are you wishing to give vaccinations other than at the recomended ages?



and which vaccines do you wish to selectively give and which not?


just wondering what your reasoning was in this as doesnt seem any point to me?

#3 nasty roses

Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:07 AM

As my GP explained to me, an awful lot of thought and research has gone into the vaccination schedule. I don't really think I could do a better job.

That said, I did break up the 12 month injections. I don't think the MMR causes autism but I freaked out a bit about DS being immunised for so much, all at once. I delayed the MMR by about three weeks, so not a lot but just to break them up.

I wouldn't do that again, and I didn't with DD. There is an awful lot of misinformation circulating about vaccines and schedules and it makes parents question decisions that really don't need to be questioned.

I am beyond grateful to live in a country where we can immunise our kids against diseases that kill and maim in  less fortunate countries. Vaccines are a gift.

#4 Future-self

Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:16 AM

I looked into it when pregnant as I was curious  by people talking about it here as somehow a 'better' way to vaccinate.
Firstly, there is no medical reason for it - it seems to appease some fears and allows some parents a feeling of control over the process which I suppose at least allows the children to eventually be vaccinated by overcoming this potential parental psychological barrier. Secondly, this:
QUOTE
As my GP explained to me, an awful lot of thought and research has gone into the vaccination schedule. I don't really think I could do a better job.


#5 tenar

Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:29 AM


I altered the schedule for DD2, slightly.

I got her vaccinated as early as possible for her 2 month, 4 month and 6 month vaccinations.  So they were at 6 weeks, 12 weeks (I think, can't quite remember) and 3.5 months (again I can't quite remember, but it was something like that).

I also got her the 18 month ones a little early, at 17 months, because there was chickenpox in our area and we had unavoidable contact with a non-vaccinating family who had kids with chickenpox and were, putting it as nicely as I can, unconcerned about exposing other people to the virus.  

I made those choices because knowing that serious diseases were about in my community (whooping cough and chickenpox in particular), I wanted my daughter to be as protected as possible from those as soon as possible.  

Hope that helps, OP.

#6 Water Dragon

Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:29 AM

OnTheJourney, a fantastic resource in this area is "The Vaccination Book" by Dr. Sears. He gives some fantastic, largely un-biased advice about individual vaccinations so that you can make an informed choice. I found it very helpful when making up my own mind. Good luck!! xx

Edited by Water Dragon, 01 February 2013 - 09:31 AM.


#7 Leggy

Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:36 AM

A workmate of mine had a kid who was seriously allergic to everything you could think of, from shortly after he was born. Because of that, they were worried about vaccinations and what reaction he might have to the adjuvants (the stuff that helps stimulate your immune system, so it responds more strongly to the thing you're vaccinating against) and considered delaying or avoiding them. Ultimately, they decided with their GP and immunologist to have the first one done in a major hospital so he could get treatment quickly if anything went wrong, and then decide from there; he turned out to be fine. I'd probably do a similar thing in those circumstances, or if there was a family history of bad reactions to vaccines (which is very, very rare).

ETA: his first vaccs were delayed by a few weeks because they were still figuring out what they hell was wrong with him and didn't want to add anything more to the mix. They just about lived at the hospital, poor things!

Edited by Leggy, 01 February 2013 - 09:42 AM.


#8 StopTheGoats

Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:43 AM

Leggy I think that's a good suggestion. If you're worried, perhaps speak to an immunologist?

We didn't give my son his Hep B at birth although he got it at his 6 week jabs. He wasn't in a risk group and I was worried that the lethargy than sometimes accompanies the jab could interfere with the establishment of breastfeeding. If my son was born in NZ, which was a possibility, he would have had the same 6 week, 4 months, 12 months as per the schedule I gave him. I consulted an obs had the support of my midwives.

#9 Imaginary friend

Posted 02 February 2013 - 10:39 AM

QUOTE
I altered the schedule for DD2, slightly.

I got her vaccinated as early as possible for her 2 month, 4 month and 6 month vaccinations.  So they were at 6 weeks, 12 weeks (I think, can't quite remember) and 3.5 months (again I can't quite remember, but it was something like that).



Just on this point - the 2 month vaccines can be given as early as 6 weeks - especially if there is an outbreak of whooping cough around at the time.

After that first vaccine, you can either get next one at usual 4 months or at 3.5 months - should be at least 8 weeks between doses though.


This is not actually a varied schedule but within recomended guidelines original.gif

#10 EsmeLennox

Posted 02 February 2013 - 10:45 AM

I don't think it matters why other people might have done it, what you need to be concerned about is why you are considering it.

I would not delay immunisation for my children unless I had a solid medical reason for doing so, ie my child had something going on that would contraindicate vaccinating at a certain point in time.

#11 Future-self

Posted 02 February 2013 - 10:47 AM

QUOTE (Water Dragon @ 01/02/2013, 09:29 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
OnTheJourney, a fantastic resource in this area is "The Vaccination Book" by Dr. Sears. He gives some fantastic, largely un-biased advice about individual vaccinations so that you can make an informed choice. I found it very helpful when making up my own mind. Good luck!! xx

Except please keep in mind that this is an American book that refers to both the schedule for the US as set down by the CDC NOT the Australian schedule and is also, in some cases, talking about completely different formulas than those used in Australia so may be  irrelevant at best.

Edited by futureself, 02 February 2013 - 11:06 AM.


#12 MadnessCraves

Posted 02 February 2013 - 10:52 AM

I've had friends who've delayed vac due to medical history or reactions among family due to vac so they, with the support of their GP spread the vaccines across the months. Their children have had no reaction to the vaccine unlike the parents. The parents are pro vac, just like some PPs didn't agree with so many vacs in one go and just wanted to prevent same issues happening to their children.

This is something worth speaking to your GP or immunologist about. they'll let you know what the best thing to do is.



#13 elizabethany

Posted 02 February 2013 - 11:12 AM

I had a very bad reaction to the schedule when I was a child, to the point where I spent a month in hospital after one set of vaccinations.  When it came to vaccinating DS, I had a chat with an immunologist, who suggested vaccinating to schedule, but doing it in his offices (at the local tertiary hospital).

He also told me that there is a big difference in the vaccines used 10 years ago, and the current ones, they used to use "whole cell" vaccines, which were more effective, but caused much greater side effects.

For the record, DS has had no adverse reactions past sleeping a lot for a few days afterwards, and I now get him vaxxed at my GP clinic.

#14 niggles

Posted 02 February 2013 - 11:15 AM

My nearly 5 year old had an intense run of ear infections when she was due for her 18 month chicken pox vaccination. She was feverish and unwell so much that I put it off. She got chicken pox a couple of months later, which was pretty awful for her. I'm not sure it was the right call but I made it with the best intentions at the time.

#15 OnTheJourney

Posted 02 February 2013 - 12:45 PM

Thank you for your replies.  My DS has had a lot going on (including having a respiratory arrest of unknown cause), plus a new GP who doesn't seem very well informed.  Think I will consult an immunologist.  Thanks again

Edited by OnTheJourney, 02 February 2013 - 12:47 PM.





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