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When do you ask about money?
When applying/interviewing


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16 replies to this topic

#1 Sassy Dingo

Posted 30 January 2013 - 11:25 AM

My DH is in correspondence with an employer about him possibly working there. They seem very keen - he got an email today asking about what kind of notice period his current work requires. They haven't even had a face to face interview.

The problem is money. When he asked for a role description they sent him the employee handbook as well which mentioned that they prefer to employ people on a contract basis for $25 - $35 an hour. He is currently employed full time as an engineer. Even $35 an hour works out to be $63K a year (assuming a 7.5hr day and 48 weeks work a year). He gets more than that now as a full time employee (with sick leave/annual/security etc). His graduate starting salary was only slightly less than $63K even.

He is actually really interested in the job - been in his current job for over 5 years now and needs a change.

My question is, when do you bring up money? He doesn't want to waste their time (and his) to take half a day off to attend an interview if the money is not negotiable. But to bring it up at this stage would just make him seem like money is all he cares about. FTR it isn't - he just wants equal to what he is getting now (of course more would be nice, but he isn't overly interested in cash).

I was thinking that perhaps the listed money does not apply to everyone. I mean, I don't expect both the receptionist and the managing director would both fit within that scale. I doubt you'd get an engineer for that kind of money at all.

DH has been in the same job since graduating and while I have changed jobs since graduating, I moved to a government job where pay is not negotiable so we have no idea!

#2 HRH Countrymel

Posted 30 January 2013 - 11:34 AM

My DP got a new job last year.

He left money discussions until well after the interview.

There was a bit of to-ing and fro-ing  and he eventually got less than he fantasised about but considerably more than what he was getting in his previous job..

I am always on the team of 'wait until they have met you' when it comes to talking about $.  

In DPs case he had actually gone for an interview for a different position, when he was being interviewed they realised that he was exactly what they needed for a role that had not been advertised yet.

Immediate $20 000 jump in salary right there without lifting a finger!

Once people have met you, realised how awesome you are and how much value you can bring to their organisation you are in a far more powerful negotiating position.

#3 -Belinda-

Posted 30 January 2013 - 11:34 AM

He could phrase something like "I note that your handbook states xyz. My current position is fufll-time where I receive $75K and abc benefits and so I would consider moving for approximately 10% more" or whatever appropriate...

If he is serious about the job, he should do this after interview for more chance of success (once they meet him and want him) but if he is happy to have them walk away and not waste his time, then now is fine.

Edited by -Belinda-, 30 January 2013 - 11:37 AM.


#4 Madeline's Mum

Posted 30 January 2013 - 11:36 AM

I would mention it ASAP. There is no point wasting anyone's time if their forecast doesn't have the budget to cover his requested wage.

Also, if he isn't contracting they won't be able to make his wage up by a bonus or similar so remember that.

#5 busymumof1&1/2

Posted 30 January 2013 - 11:37 AM

Hi OP,
   Can you look on seek for an agency who deal primarily with job description of your husbands? Then go to the agency website, they may have a salary report. They gather this information themselves, and it gives an overall picture of the salaries a person can expect in particular roles.
He could then bring this report up with the employer when talking about a salary.
Eg, I looked at the latest 'agency salary review' which has an average salary for position as $xK. What is the package like with your company if I was fortunate enough to get the role, and are there any other perks you company may have available to their fulltime staff, like salary sacrificing.
HR would be dealing with these questions all the time, and should be happy to be forthcoming, especially if you already have some facts on your side.

#6 Mpjp is feral

Posted 30 January 2013 - 11:38 AM

QUOTE (-Belinda- @ 30/01/2013, 12:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
He could phrase something like "I note that your handbook states xyz. My current position is fufll-time where I receive $75K and abc benefits and so I would consider moving for approximately 10% more" or whatever appropriate...



If they've headhunted him then I agree with the above.

If it's not, I'd wait until the interview and bring it up towards the end-ish.

Also when calculating like to like salary for contract - don't forget to caulculate in additional costs. If its an actual contract role as opposed to a fixed term employment then he wont get annual leave, sick leave, long service leave accruals and pay have to invoice them (accounting costs), and consider items such a public liability and indeminty insurances, workcover premiums, superannuation payments etc etc.

#7 Ice Queen

Posted 30 January 2013 - 11:39 AM

QUOTE (-Belinda- @ 30/01/2013, 10:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
He could phrase something like "I note that your handbook states xyz. My current position is fufll-time where I receive $75K and abc benefits and so I would consider moving for approximately 10% more" or whatever appropriate...


No way!  Then you cut out the possibity that they were going to offer a lot more.  Any employer with a half a brain is going to offer what they can get away with.

I would arrange a face to face interview and then bring it up at the end of the interview once they have had a good discussion.  No point negotiating salary and benefits if they dont like each other face to face.  Also your DH could really impress in the interview and they will offer what it takes to get him.  

Salaries (out of government roles) can very much be decided purely on the candidate and what they are worth to a company.  Hence why they may not have a 'set' salary for the position.  So your DH needs to sell himself, show his value and then get paid accordingly.

#8 Mpjp is feral

Posted 30 January 2013 - 11:41 AM

QUOTE (busymumof1&1/2 @ 30/01/2013, 12:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi OP,
   Can you look on seek for an agency who deal primarily with job description of your husbands? Then go to the agency website, they may have a salary report. They gather this information themselves, and it gives an overall picture of the salaries a person can expect in particular roles.
He could then bring this report up with the employer when talking about a salary.
Eg, I looked at the latest 'agency salary review' which has an average salary for position as $xK. What is the package like with your company if I was fortunate enough to get the role, and are there any other perks you company may have available to their fulltime staff, like salary sacrificing.
HR would be dealing with these questions all the time, and should be happy to be forthcoming, especially if you already have some facts on your side.



Yes we do - but I wouldn't be mentioning the 'research' you suggest - HR people know what's behind those reports!! Unless its public service or some other which has awards or eb's with band payments etc...

#9 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:08 PM

Wait until after the interview.  Gives them a chance to suss out your DH and your DH a chance to do the same.  If both are interested, then talk money.

QUOTE
Salaries (out of government roles) can very much be decided purely on the candidate and what they are worth to a company. Hence why they may not have a 'set' salary for the position. So your DH needs to sell himself, show his value and then get paid accordingly.

agree with this.  My DH is an (civil) engineer and was responsible for the salaries of people in his office  (starting and ongoing salaries).  They varied greatly, depending on how the person negotiated and what they brought to the company.  

DH himself recently started a new job - he didn't discuss salary until after interview.  He said it wasn't worth it until he figured out what they wanted, what he could bring to them and how they would suit him/us.

Edited by YodaTheWrinkledOne, 30 January 2013 - 12:09 PM.


#10 FloralArrangement

Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:31 PM

I would bring it up post interview, it was discussed in dh's interview. My dh went for a job last year which is considerably less money and no company car, but he is much closer to home (10min drive as opposed to 40 minute drive). He works 10-15 hrs less a week but still full time and doesn't have an a hole for a boss. They were offering too little for the position for us to accept, would cause financial stress.

Dh sent an email saying while the job and company sounded wonderful he could not take such a significant pay cut for a specialist position as it would cause financial stress and he would have to withdraw from the process. The company already knew that he would be getting paid a lot less. They upped their offer and dh took the job. It has been well worth it for him and our family.

Edited by FloralArrangement, 30 January 2013 - 12:32 PM.


#11 HGL

Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:53 PM

If it's difficult to attend an interview and you don't want to waste your time, there's no shame in asking for a salary range of the position. Everyone hiring has been in the same position themselves and they don't want to have their time wasted either. If they offer a lower than expected salary, be upfront and tell them, some companies have strict bands, others can negotiate.

My other advice is to never tell a recruiting company your current salary. Base salaries aren't the only considerations, there is often other benefits (maternity leave, bonuses, contract length, super) that vary considerably between companies.

I was offered a job 2 years ago. I made the mistake of telling the HR person my current salary. Although they offered me 12K more, it was a 3 year contract and I wouldn't be eligible for a salary increase or bonuses for 18 months. In the meantime, my current role had six monthly increases, permanent full time, 6mth paid maternity leave and 18% super. I also knew than in 3 years times I'd possibly be on/inbetween maternity leave and I didn't feel secure with a contract role. The HR person didn't understand that the lost of benefits didn't make the 12K bump worthwhile (for me - I didn't mention my plans to have children).

#12 Sassy Dingo

Posted 30 January 2013 - 01:36 PM

Thank you very much for all your responses. I'll show him this thread when he gets home.

I hope they negotiate and he gets the job - it really makes me feel sorry for him when I wave him off to work in the morning (I'm on maternity leave) and he is so depressed to go to work.

If this job doesn't work out I think we need to look at him looking after the baby for a while to give him a break.



#13 Indi

Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:21 PM

QUOTE (countrymel @ 30/01/2013, 12:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I am always on the team of 'wait until they have met you' when it comes to talking about $.

Why waste both parties' time if the figure on offer is miles below your expectations.  I would ask for a ballpark at least before you commit to meeting with anyone.

#14 erindiv

Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:27 PM

IME it has been discussed during the interview. It really is up to him when he asks, but bear in mind they will be used to the question. Most people do as. They won't be offended by it.

#15 Escapin

Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:35 PM

Lots of good advice. I would also wait until the interview to talk money. Even if this role turns out to be dud money, if he has a great interview, then he'll be on their radar when something better comes up. Interviews are rarely a waste of time (and yes, I've interviewed LOTS of people).

Also, when it gets to money, always be the first person to mention a dollar amount - probably an 'all up' hourly rate if it's contracting. It's called framing, and it means that all discussions after that are framed around what you've said. And as a few PPers said, NEVER mention what you were on before (it's simply not relevant).

#16 WinterIsComing

Posted 30 January 2013 - 05:27 PM

I would never consider intervewing until I knew what money was at stake. This is for graduates and those trying to get into a new field.

That's the first question I would ask the recruitment agent. I would be asking for at least a ballpark. In my industry, money can vary by 30% for my position, and obviously I wouldn't be interested by anything that pays less than my current salary...or even the same!






#17 Coffeegirl

Posted 30 January 2013 - 06:31 PM

QUOTE (WinterIsComing @ 30/01/2013, 06:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would never consider intervewing until I knew what money was at stake. This is for graduates and those trying to get into a new field.

That's the first question I would ask the recruitment agent. I would be asking for at least a ballpark. In my industry, money can vary by 30% for my position, and obviously I wouldn't be interested by anything that pays less than my current salary...or even the same!


^^^. This.  It's wasting both party's time if the money being offered isn't going to be enough.  

If your DH is going from Full time salaried employee to contract employee then I would be expecting enough extra in his hourly wage to cover annual leave sick leave, superannuation, tax costs etc.

I'm not sure but as a contractor would he have to register for and lodge a BAS if he earns over $55,000?




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