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When is a Puppy
No Longer a Puppy


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#1 MissingInAction

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:16 PM

How old is pup when he grows out of his "pup" stage?
How did your pup/dog cope with a newborn in the family?



#2 FiveAus

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:26 PM

I have got a 16 month old who is still a "puppy". She is still soft and cuddly, and a little bit naughty (this morning she got in our fishpond and pulled all the plants out of their pots). Se's very enthusiastic about everything, but she might always be like that.
She is hopefully going to have her own puppies later this year, so maybe she'll grow up a bit then. I am enjoying her as she is though, she is absolutely gorgeous.

Don't have a newborn, so can't help you there, sorry.



#3 MissingInAction

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:30 PM

Additional Info:  It's a purebred kelpie in question and he is a very active, lively, excitable bundle of joy.  He loves children.  He loves everyone, really.

#4 *Spikey*

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:38 PM

A Kelpie? Um, never.... laugh.gif  

Best you can do is train, train, train and compete in stuff like agility and herding competitions to keep their brains ticking over.

Teething finishes at 2yo for most dogs, so chewing tends to slow down a bit after that.

#5 caninestorm

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:39 PM

From the kelpies I know, they are a slow maturing breed. Sorry Tounge1.gif

In saying that, all the kelpies I know are good with kids as long as they are taught not to jump up on them.

#6 FiveAus

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:55 PM

A Kelpie? Maybe 12.
I handled one in a dog show a few months ago, and she was a little livewire. Little devil child too. Very, very different to my biddable and easy-going Australian Shepherds.

#7 MissingInAction

Posted 28 January 2013 - 07:01 PM

TWELVE?!  ohmy.gif

*starts crying*

Hahaha... as I typed that my kelpie came up to where I'm sitting and put his nose on the laptop, gazed lovingly into my eyes and just sat there for a minute.  Then lost interest, walked to the living room and passed out on the floor.  

He's almost a year old and he's definitely calmed down a lot recently and is more mellow, more affectionate, more relaxed than he was a few months ago (though he is barking a lot more but that warrants a whole other thread).

#8 Justaduck

Posted 28 January 2013 - 07:04 PM

I have a kelpie x cattle dog. I think around his second birthday he calmed down a lot. From 9mths - 2 he was a terror! Everything got chewed, torn, or ripped to shreds.
Apart from usual doggy excitement when you go outside (thinking of course it would be playtime) he is lovely and calm now. He is so good with DD in that he couldn't care less about her, to the point where I feel sorry for her as she seeks him out at the door and he just looks away.

He turned 4, four days after DD was born, so not a puppy by then. Transition was hard as he was the baby before her, slept in the bedroom and all. Started transitioning him to the hallway outside bedroom, then to garage before she was born (to sleep at night). He went through a big sulky stage as well. We had done all the normal suggested tricks to make it easy on him

#9 Puppy Love

Posted 28 January 2013 - 07:18 PM

I think they are puppies until about 2 years.  
But it depends on breed & intelligence. My PIL's have a beagle it's 5yrs & still acts like a puppy.  

I have a rotti, who went to puppy school & can do basic tasks like sit, drop, shake, stay.
Our newborn arrived in December 2012 & the rotti was 14months. My DH brought home worn baby clothes, nappies etc for the dog to smell before we came home.
We have had no problems with our dog, thought she would be jealous, but she doesn't seem to worry about the baby.
She is an indoor dog so is constantly with us while I BF, change nappies etc. baby sits in a swing which she also lies next to. I never leave the baby alone while the dog is there just in case. So if I shower etc i just put the dog outside.
For us it works really well & I'm always talking to the dog so she is included.
Good luck OP


#10 B.L.J

Posted 28 January 2013 - 07:34 PM

My mum has a purebred Kelpie.  At 3 I have noticed she has calmed down A LOT.  Still gets super excitable when we first get to mum's house but no jumping anymore.

Around DS she is the most calmest placid dog you will ever meet.  She was a couple of months old when they first met and I watched her drop to her belly and commando crawl across the room then lay next to him with her nose just touching.  She would do the commando crawl every time she saw him sitting down for practically a year afterwards.  This dog was still in her jumping and chewing stage yet would barely move when DS was in the room... and we only saw them every few months!

DS is a kid who can't handle things in his face - she seemed to sense that and monitored her behaviour to match.  This dog is the most in your face dog you can get!!




#11 insomniac

Posted 28 January 2013 - 07:38 PM

We have a 19 month old pure bred Kelpie boy. He is seriously the laziest Kelpie I've ever seen! He doesn't jump at all on anything (used to jump on people all the time but has stopped months ago with lots of training). He won't even chase a ball more than a couple of times lol. He LOVES people and is really great with the kids.

When we went to pick a pup from the breeder, out of four pups he was the one who came and sat next to us and wanted to be around people, the other three ran off straight away.

#12 MissingInAction

Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:05 PM

It's really encouraging to hear good family-friendly kelpie dog stories original.gif keep them coming!! original.gif


QUOTE (insomniac @ 28/01/2013, 07:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
He won't even chase a ball more than a couple of times lol.


I've noticed that my boy (and my friend who has kelpies has noticed the same thing) is not at all interested in retrieving balls... he'll chase them, sometimes, but he won't return them to me very often.   rolleyes.gif

#13 midstudentcatie

Posted 28 January 2013 - 10:01 PM

Dad's kelpie is hilarious! She's not your typical kelpie, very laid back, doesn't go stir crazy if she misses a walk, isn't destructive, and is more than happy to snooze her day away in the sun!

She is well capable of jumping Dad's fence, but she never has. We watched her one day when we arrived, she was jumping up with excitement and easily clearing the height of the fence, but never worked out that if she jumped forwards as well as up, she was free. Special unit she is! She very rarely jumps now, more does an excited bum waggle where her tail is wagging so hard that she ends up walking in circles, with her back end leading. We took her herding once - she was terrified of the ducks and sheep and tried to run in the opposite direction. She loves chasing a tennis ball, but does she bring it back? Never. She runs after it, stops it, looks at us and figures that we're walking towards the ball anyway, so it's a waste of energy bringing it back. Unless she's swimming and we throw the ball in the water, then she'll bring it back, because heaven forbid it gets lost in the ocean!

Keira was the same as insomniac's pup - when we went to pick her up, she was a little reserved but approached us comfortably, then fell asleep in my brother's lap. Two wouldn't come near us, the remaining one was so OTT that we knew straight away she'd be a handful and there was no way she was coming home with us!

#14 Oriental lily

Posted 29 January 2013 - 10:50 AM

My fil has a kelpie cross lab x dalmation.

Three very hyper slow to mature breeds.

Yet she is the most laziest, cruisy, happy go lucky dog you can meet.

Fil however brings her wherever he goes. Always inside, in trucks, meeting clients and customers, in markets. Her brain is always active and their is always a new interesting thing to do.

It's the perfect life for dog of her breeding. I think with these type of high energy, high driven dogs if they can not run for km and km everyday their brain needs to be kept busy instead.
If you can not at east do one of these things then that's when you might hit trouble with them.

She is also wonderful with his seven grandchildren and will happily play ball with them without making a nuisance of herself.

My sil had a kelpie who would drive you nuts with her obsession with playing fetch. Constantly shoving bottle tops, leaves, twigs,rocks anything in your hand for you to throw for her.
Very annoying to be around because she would not stop. Even after all ball were hidden.

This particular dog is now 12 and still the same.
Deffinately should have been a working dog,

#15 ~*Twilight~Zone*~

Posted 29 January 2013 - 12:02 PM

I've got a Kelpie X and he is 15 going on 16 and whilst he is almost blind and deaf he still has his puppy moments.

We also have a Great Dane and he is 8 going on 9 so old age for a GD but he has never grown up.  Has always acted like a puppy.

#16 Jenks

Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:25 AM

our newest addition is kelpie x (7 months), has a kelpie head but the size of a Jack russel. She is a total nut, has never ending energy and chews like nothing else. I have her booked in for training in the next couple of weeks..should be interesting biggrin.gif




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