Jump to content

Daycare centres with children with severe food allergies


  • Please log in to reply
51 replies to this topic

#1 Bondia

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:11 PM

My local preschool has just made the decision for the whole preschool to go dairy, egg and nut-free - because of several children with severe allergies.

I'm interested in whether other centres have gone this way, and if not, how they manage children with severe allergies?

The reaction we are getting at the moment is mixed. It's in a very low income area and I know for some parents the substitutes can seem expensive.

What are other's thoughts on this?

#2 premmie_29weeks

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:17 PM

I can understand they want to be inclusive, but the combination of all three is quite limiting...my son loves yoghurt, cheese and peanut butter. The centre he is going to this year is sesame and nut free due to allergies...and that to me is fine. Removing dairy and egg as well I think makes it very limiting, not in themselves but because so many other food contain traces of all three...



#3 mumtoactivetoddler

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:19 PM

I think the nut free is reasonable, I think the dairy and egg free is totally unreasonable. To be honest dairy and egg free take away a significant number of options, in fact for some kids almost all food they eat for lunch would include these. As someone who has had an egg allergic child, tbh the substitutes are a pain in the butt. I never ever managed to get the egg substitiute to work and banana and apple sauce only work for some things. They also realistically change the texture and taste of a lot of things. I think dairy is unreasonabe as I think a cheese sandwhich is a good lunch and also quite a lot of breads have milk in them.

What I actually think is going to happen is that most parents will ignore it, and send food with at least these things cooked in it especially milk and butter (and no oil is not a substitute and the dairy free marg is disgusting and is not a natural food). This means that instead of managing the fact there is dairy and egg at the preschool, there will be a false perception that it is safe and the child is actually in more danger. I honestly think you may find people will actually try and move to a more reasonable preschool.

#4 Feral Alpacas

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:19 PM

I have seen a child go in to anaphylactic shock and it was very scary- and it wasn't even my child so I imagine parents of children with severe allergies would be terrified when this happens. However it would be very hard for all parents and staff for that matter, to go dairy, eggs and nut free.

I am currently trialling dairy-free to see if it makes a difference with DD2's reflux and eczema and I must admit its tough. To rule out eggs and nuts as well? A big challenge.

I know parents of kids with allergies have it tougher, but I really don't see how it would be possible to ensure the entire preschool/daycare was egg, nut and dairy free. And btw are we talking traces of are ok, or completely free?

#5 kadoodle

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:21 PM

The gym creche I send my kids to is nut, egg and dairy free due to several kids with severe allergies.  It's no skin off my nose to send a piece of fruit or some cut up veggies for a snack.  I could imagine it would be much more problematic if a proper meal and additional snacks was needed to be provided for a long day stay.

But what's the alternative?  A classmate dies or gets very sick?

#6 barrington

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:22 PM

Both my children's schools are nut and egg free.  Whether or not dairy would be an issue would depend on how restrictive the dairy free is.  



#7 epl0822

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:22 PM

Totally ridiculous. I don't get why daycares insist on inconveniencing the vast majority of people for the sake of being inclusive to a few. When I have special circumstances I don't expect everybody's decisions and experiences to revolve around mine and cater to my own individual needs.

#8 deejie

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:27 PM

DS1 has allergies (including anaphylaxis) to egg, dairy and peanut amongst a few other things as well.

The child care centre he attends is nut free.

The 3 and 4 year old kindergarten I hope to get him in to is nut free.

I must admit I worry about the things he is allergic to. HUGELY. Until you are the parent of an anaphylactic child watching their face blow up before your eyes and having uncontrollable coughing fits in the back of an ambulance, you have no idea of the terror that hangs over our head every day.

One tiny piece of egg from someone's sandwich would be all it takes. How can a kindergarten teacher fully supervise a group of 3/4 year olds who *cannot be trusted* with food choices that affect their health (essentially, perhaps their life). We do our best to drum into DS1 not to accept food off other children or adults. But in preschool, I would not place his life in to his own hands. He will no doubt become more reliable as he gets older, but preschool? No.

Yes, it is a pain for the other parents. But honestly, dairy-free margarine is the same cost as the regular one. Skip the cheese for something else. Skipping the yoghurt for a day won't hurt. Don't pack biscuits with egg, nuts or dairy in them (there are HEAPS freely available in the supermarket, stock standard Arnotts ones). Low socioeconomic just doesn't cut it as an excuse for me.

It sounds as though the preschool has done a poor job of providing lists of suitable alternatives. Can they liaise with the parents of the allergic children? They will have an extensive list of allergen friendly foods that can be packed for snacks or lunches.

#9 solongsuckers

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:27 PM

QUOTE (epl0822 @ 28/01/2013, 03:22 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Totally ridiculous. I don't get why daycares insist on inconveniencing the vast majority of people for the sake of being inclusive to a few. When I have special circumstances I don't expect everybody's decisions and experiences to revolve around mine and cater to my own individual needs.


I actually agree with this and I do have a child with severe allergies. I don't expect anything to be excluded for other children. The only time that I do really appreciate if they do that though is if it is something in a group that all the kids will be eating and sharing.

#10 TillyTake2

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:28 PM

QUOTE (barrington @ 28/01/2013, 03:22 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Both my children's schools are nut and egg free.  Whether or not dairy would be an issue would depend on how restrictive the dairy free is.


What do you mean how restrictive dairy free is. Dairy free is dairy free, there are no "grades".

My son is allergic to dairy & soy so I know how hard avoiding these things is. Personally, as the parent of an allergic child I would prefer the preschool wasn't free of the allergens but that the staff were villigent about supervision.

Nut & egg allergies are different as they can quite often be touch or airborn sensitive so if a child has an egg sandwhich & doesn't wash their hands then plays with something the allergic child touches then they can react. I've not come accross kids that are touch or airborn sensitive to dairy so it is quite different. It would be reasonable to eliminate allergens if a child was touch or air sensitive to it as that is the only way to protect them.

#11 deejie

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:29 PM

QUOTE (epl0822 @ 28/01/2013, 03:22 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Totally ridiculous. I don't get why daycares insist on inconveniencing the vast majority of people for the sake of being inclusive to a few. When I have special circumstances I don't expect everybody's decisions and experiences to revolve around mine and cater to my own individual needs.


Daycares generally provide the food for the children who are attending, so I really don't understand your issue here?



#12 CallMeFeral

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:35 PM

Wow, that's hard.
Our centre is nut free, there is a child with severe allergies in DD's class, I believe, he has his own food - not sure how they police cross contamination etc (it's part of a daycare though, so they cook there).

Hard call. On the one hand it's someone's life - on the other hand dairy and egg free really does cut down a LOT of food and some children are fussy...

#13 Bondia

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:38 PM

To clarify a few things:

- This is a preschool where you bring lunch for the child... Crackers and fruit are provided by the preschool for morning tea. The preschool closes at 3 so arvo tea is not an issue - so we are talking one meal only.

- Children attending are from age 2 upwards... One of the allergic children is only 2 and any traces of dairy eg a dot of yoghurt on a chair would be enough to cause a reaction.

- The children with allergies are not at the centre every day but staff felt it was easier to have a blanket rule, than have set days with different requirements. They were concerned parents owuld forget which day was which and not be vigilant.

- The concern is not just for the safety of the allergic children - but also bearing in mind the educators, who are feeling quite stressed at the risks, and the other children who may be traumatised if a child becomes ill.

#14 SMforshort

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:46 PM

I am incredibly fortunate to have children without allergy issues.

If my kids were at that preschool I would want to do everything I could to assist the parents and carers of these children with allergies.

But....

I would need some help adjusting my meal plans to suit.  I have never had to deal with allergy issues before.

Maybe a list of suggested lunch ideas could be sent home, including brand names of bread, fillings etc that would be safe.  I'm sure if I had a list like this I could find lunch ideas that would suit my kids and this would take away some of the anxiety that I may inadvertantly do the wrong thing.

#15 _Alana_

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:52 PM

Our centre is already nut and egg free and also halal. Than my sons meals are dairy free too. Luckily he can have soy and dairy free butter so his meals are replaced to suit him. I work there and the cook has no trouble with this.
It's hard to say whether this should be done across the country but it's certainly not hard to do and if it just makes life easier for everyone why not ??

#16 deejie

Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:53 PM

QUOTE (Bondia @ 28/01/2013, 03:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
To clarify a few things:

- This is a preschool where you bring lunch for the child... Crackers and fruit are provided by the preschool for morning tea. The preschool closes at 3 so arvo tea is not an issue - so we are talking one meal only.

- Children attending are from age 2 upwards... One of the allergic children is only 2 and any traces of dairy eg a dot of yoghurt on a chair would be enough to cause a reaction.

- The children with allergies are not at the centre every day but staff felt it was easier to have a blanket rule, than have set days with different requirements. They were concerned parents owuld forget which day was which and not be vigilant.

- The concern is not just for the safety of the allergic children - but also bearing in mind the educators, who are feeling quite stressed at the risks, and the other children who may be traumatised if a child becomes ill.


Thanks for the clarification OP. I can sympathise with the severity of the reaction-- a dot of yoghurt on a chair when my DS1 was 2 would have caused him to break out in to hives (contact allergy). If he ingested it accidentally, he would have broken out in hives all over his face and body. His lips would have swollen. He would vomit, then dry retch for an hour after that. If it was a drop of egg, in goes the epipen and off to hospital.

All daycare/preschool centres have to write an allergy management plan for each child with an allergy. Due to the severity of allergies, this is how they have deemed them best managed. It seems however their communication with the parents of other children is very poor and unfortunately in this case the poor allergic child and/or their parents cops the blame.

I would write to them personally (encourage other parents to do the same) and request a list of appropriate foods. Admittedly, when I first had to go egg/dairy/nut free I completely freaked out because it seemed absolutely impossible. It truly is not as hard as it sounds.

#17 barrington

Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:05 PM

QUOTE
What do you mean how restrictive dairy free is. Dairy free is dairy free, there are no "grades".
The first page I opened after a quick google search included bread and deli ham as containing dairy.  Are they banning those items or just yoghurt, cheese etc.

In addition, even though my children's school is egg free, you are still allowed to bring in homemade biscuits that are cooked using an egg.

#18 Phascogale

Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:07 PM

It's going to be extremely hard to police and it will create a sense of safety that won't actually be there. The nut part is probably fair enough but not the dairy and egg.

What happens when a child brings a sandwich that is on what looks like ordinary bread, but it actually contains milk.  You aren't going to know.  There are a lot of products that don't seem to contain dairy but you will find milk in the flavourings (usually you read the ingredients and they look dairy free but on the allergen advice statement there will be something said that it contains milk products).  Unless the kids are bringing in the packets and the labels you won't know.

Also what do you do when a parent bakes something then says that it's dairy free but it's not?

If it was a preschool that ran for 2-4 hours then having a meal of crackers and fruit would be okay but it sounds like the kids will be there from 9-3 which is a long time to go without a more substantial meal.  One day a week is less of an issue but if there are kids attending 3/4 or more days a week then this is much more of a concern.

Supervision of eating (probably making sure the kids in question are watched to make sure they don't eat/touch anyone elses meal) will probably be safer.  And then supervising hand washing before and after eating (plus wiping everything down too).

Allergy kids are very good at watching their intake and it's drummed into them from very early on and they know how they feel when they have a reaction.  However 2 or 3 is a bit young to manage this.  Older 4/5 year olds are much better.  This needs to continue where ever they go and not be complacent at preschool or kinder because you can never really be sure.

Anaphalaxis Australia don't advocate for banning foods for that sense of complacency.  Maybe the centre needs to provide all meals if they want to go down this route.

I have a child allergic to all three of these allergens.



#19 2bundles

Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:09 PM

What happens if the next enrolment has a wheat allergy, and the next soy?   Somewhere you need to draw the line. I'm not sure where that is.

I have a child who has had an anaphylactic episode, and at daycare age had several allergies. I never asked the centre to stop other people sending those foods.

We ate at cafes, other people's houses etc. I was "alert but not alarmed".

I have no problem with avoiding a few things, but it is more important that the child is vigilant. Schools will never be as vigilant as preschool/daycare.

Hard call

#20 eskimoo

Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:10 PM

Way off topic but Deejie, what Arnotts biscuits do you buy for your DS?   My DD has the same allergies but not to the extent you have to deal with and I'd love to expand our snack options for out and about original.gif
Thanks original.gif

#21 solongsuckers

Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:16 PM

QUOTE (TillyTake2 @ 28/01/2013, 03:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Nut & egg allergies are different as they can quite often be touch or airborn sensitive so if a child has an egg sandwhich & doesn't wash their hands then plays with something the allergic child touches then they can react. I've not come accross kids that are touch or airborn sensitive to dairy so it is quite different. It would be reasonable to eliminate allergens if a child was touch or air sensitive to it as that is the only way to protect them.


One kinder my son went to claimed that they couldn't have any egg or nut stuff at all in case of allergies. So no nut or egg products at all. I gave my opinion which differed from theirs and they told me how they didn't even have egg cartons in case someone was that allergic they couldn't touch it.

BUT, they didn't make anyone wash their hands when they came in.

So you can't have egg cartons in case someone has a reaction to it but I could give my kid peanut butter and eggs on toast and not wash his hands and send him to kinder and no one would even know. I think they missed the mark there.

If you're going to go all out, do it right!

#22 solongsuckers

Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:19 PM

QUOTE (Phascogale @ 28/01/2013, 04:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It's going to be extremely hard to police and it will create a sense of safety that won't actually be there.


This is exactly why I don't expect my child's daycare, kinder, etc to have a ban on any of the foods she is allergic to

#23 Elizabethandfriend

Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:19 PM

Our kinder has been egg, dairy and nut free for a few years and last year we nearly had to go 'wheat free' as well (luckily the child who was allergic to wheat had tests that showed it was as no longer an issue before kinder started).

Its very restrictive but really - the children's safety has to come first.

it has also been fantastic for promoting healthy eating - virtually every lunchbox is now full of fruit and vegetables with very few processed foods.  My daughter is now used to that diet and i intend to continue it at school.

#24 Let_it_Rain

Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:26 PM

QUOTE (deejie @ 28/01/2013, 03:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
One tiny piece of egg from someone's sandwich would be all it takes. How can a kindergarten teacher fully supervise a group of 3/4 year olds who *cannot be trusted* with food choices that affect their health (essentially, perhaps their life). We do our best to drum into DS1 not to accept food off other children or adults. But in preschool, I would not place his life in to his own hands. He will no doubt become more reliable as he gets older, but preschool? No.

Yes, it is a pain for the other parents. But honestly, dairy-free margarine is the same cost as the regular one. Skip the cheese for something else. Skipping the yoghurt for a day won't hurt. Don't pack biscuits with egg, nuts or dairy in them (there are HEAPS freely available in the supermarket, stock standard Arnotts ones). Low socioeconomic just doesn't cut it as an excuse for me.


What happens if a child has had eggs for breakfast and not washed their hands properly, or has got some on their clothing.

When I read of these contact allergies I honestly can not see how the kids can attend a daycare environment just due to the fact kids will touch and are generally not 100% clean.

I also can not believe the dairy free options are the same price. Maybe they are the same price as some of the more expensive brands, but a lot more expensive then generic products that a lot of people buy to save money.

QUOTE (2bundles @ 28/01/2013, 04:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What happens if the next enrolment has a wheat allergy, and the next soy?   Somewhere you need to draw the line. I'm not sure where that is.



This sums of my views on it as well. Unfortunately it reaches a point where the needs of everyone can not be met if exclusion of allergens is required.

#25 a letter to Elise.

Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:33 PM

I think it's great, but I would be concerned that some parents wouldn't adhere to it properly. I am gluten free and dairy free, and some people just dont take it seriously so I'd prefer that the centre provided food to make sure. If it meant the safety of someone's child, I'd happily do whatever they suggested. I would want some suggestions of safe foods though.
If my children have coeliacs as well, I wouldn't want the whole centre to be gluten free on their account, but I would want assurances of separate food preparation. The difference for me is that while that they could get sick from cross contamination, it doesn't carry the extreme risks of a severe food allergy.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

Special Ticket Offer, Save $8!

The Essential Baby & Toddler Show is back this April! Save $8 off the door price for a limited time only!

Why I breastfed my son until he was three

The fact that I not only breastfed my son, but breastfed him for three and a half years, seems pretty incredible in retrospect.

Do babies and young children see ghosts?

Do babies and young children see ghosts? If you’ve pondered the question, you’re not alone.

15 years with Essential Baby: meet Therese

"Life has a funny way of giving you what you need when you need it the most."

Mum causes a stir by taking a stand against leggings

A mum has found herself the subject of debate after claiming tight bottoms cause lustful thoughts in men.

Don't set a parenting goal for 2015 - do this instead

The problem with goal setting as a parent is the measure. How do we really know if we’re succeeding?

5 pregnancy myths that just won't go away

When you're expecting, it often seems like everyone is keen to offer advice about what you should and shouldn't do in the interests of your health and wellbeing.

RPA hospital contacting mums after discovering vaccine storage fault

Sydney's Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPA) is trying to contact women who had babies at the facility after discovering a fault in a refrigerator containing vaccines.

'Nutella' not a baby name, French court says

A French court has blocked parents from naming their baby girl after the hazelnut spread Nutella, arguing it would make her the target of mockery.

Why I'm never calling myself 'just a mum' again

I’ve grown three human beings. I feed them, dress them, teach them, care for them and love them 24 hours a day. Yet for eight years, when I meet new people and they’ve asked me what I do, I tell them: “I’m just a mum”.

Rosie Batty named 2015 Australian of the Year

One year ago, Rosie Batty could not have imagined she'd be where she is. Tonight the grieving mum who put domestic violence on the national agenda was named Australian of the Year.

Five reasons to hug more

Hugging – some of us thrive on it, even depend on it – and then there are those who don't care for it really. So, are they missing out?

Help - my three-year-old has started throwing tantrums

My daughter never went through the "terrible twos" but began throwing wild tantrums shortly after her third birthday.

That's commitment

First peek at Sonia Kruger's daughter Maggie

"She smells so good, I could eat her," Kruger tells co-host David Campbell.

Mum assists in own caesarean surgery

A mum who partly delivered her own twins during a caesarean has encouraged other women to take control of their birthing experience.

How to handle common childhood regressions

Regression can be a natural and common part of development prompted by a variety of factors, but that doesn't make it less frustrating.

Disgruntled dad's pram ad goes viral

When buying a second hand pram, there are lots of things to take into consideration. 

Man discovers he's a dad after finding 55-year-old letter

Discovering you are about to father a baby is startling enough - never mind finding out you have a 61-year-old son.

15 thoughts mums have during a tantrum

Ranging from mild to feral and triggered by events both minor and major, tantrums certainly keep life interesting.

Natural pain relief in the early stages of labour

While managing labour pains on your own can be daunting, there are a number of natural pain relief options to help you cope until you are admitted to hospital.

Win an Octonauts prize pack

To celebrate the launch of Octonauts Live! Operation Reef Shield, a spectacular underwater adventure live on stage, we are giving away an amazing Octonauts prize pack to one lucky fan.

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

What's hot on EB

Forgotten Baby Syndrome claims the life of toddler

One baby dies every eight days in the back of a car in the US, victims of 'forgotten baby syndrome'.

For a brief time, I was touched by an angel

For a brief time, I was touched by an angel. You stole my heart, and changed me into the women I am today.

Chinese woman gives birth to quintuplets

After six years of trying for a baby, a couple’s dreams have come true many times over after the mum gave birth to quintuplets this week.

Chrissie Swan has reached her "sex quota"

Chrissie Swan says she and her partner have sex once a year due to her fear of falling pregnant.

Stars help save choking babies

It's an important lesson to learn, but one that busy new mums and dads might overlook until it's too late.

New Girl star Zooey Deschanel pregnant

Actress Zooey Deschanel is expecting her first child with her producer boyfriend Jacob Pechenik.

16 times 'dad reflexes' saved the day

Of course, in some cases they may be the ones who actually got their child into a precarious position in the first place, but we'll ignore that for now.

Couple's 'non-traditional' pregnancy announcement goes viral

Knowing you are not the father of your pregnant wife's baby would usually indicate a rocky relationship ahead for traditional parents.

The trials and tribulations of identical triplet newborns

Pip Donnelly is still playing spot the difference with her newborn identical triplets, Isabelle, Georgina and Frankie.

Win an Octonauts prize pack

To celebrate the launch of Octonauts Live! Operation Reef Shield, a spectacular underwater adventure live on stage, we are giving away an amazing Octonauts prize pack to one lucky fan.

Earthquake baby thriving five years on

Jenny Alexis is lucky to be alive after spending four days buried in the rubble of the 2010 Haitian earthquake, but now she's a thriving five year old.

Please don't say I'm lucky because I was adopted

On the one hand I was having a regular life with friends and sports and sleepovers and school. But I was also always wondering: Did my mother love me? What was wrong with me?

An open letter to non-parents who offer advice on child-rearing

Kitty, when you’re the parent of my child you’re welcome to wade in with an opinion – but until then, I’d prefer you to have a supportive ear and a glass of wine ready.

Couple arrested over baby gun video

A US couple faces charges after investigators say they found mobile phone videos showing the woman's 12-month-old daughter putting a handgun in her mouth.

NSW Health dumps 10-year limit on frozen embryos

A 10-year time limit on storing frozen embryos that were created with donor sperm has been dropped by the NSW government.

How my happy-go-lucky husband became a monster

Sharan Nicholson-Rogers watched her husband change from a happy-go-lucky police officer into an unpredictable man prone to violent and emotional outbursts.

Dads-to-be experience hormonal changes, too

Dads-to-be experience hormonal changes in line with their pregnant partners, a new study shows.

'They were just doing their job': mum of toddler killed in police chase gone wrong

"They were just doing their job. I feel so sorry for them. It is all just too sad."

Miscarriages to be formally recognised by NSW government

Women who miscarry will be able to obtain an optional "recognition of loss" certificate as a formal recognition of their often heartbreaking loss.

Cafe cubby house 'too noisy' for neighbours

Teenage parties, domestic disputes, or raucous late night pubs are the things that usually come to mind when you think neighbourhood noise complaints.

Dad films baby playing with snake

Most parents would not consider a snake an appropriate playmate for their baby, but a US dad who filmed his daughter playing with a python has defended himself against criticism.

Clever breastfeeding products

Check out this range of products designed to help make your breastfeeding journey more enjoyable, manageable and convenient.

 

Back to School Offer

Findababysitter.com.au

We've got you covered for this school year. Use www.findababysitter.com.au to meet local nannies now.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.