Jump to content

Trouble Breastfeeding
I am in so much pain!


  • Please log in to reply
30 replies to this topic

#1 Electric_Blue

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:02 AM

My son is only 4 days old. Tonight was our first night at home. I've had so many trouble breastfeeding. Sometimes I can latch him on and everything is fine and dandy. And othertimes (well most of the time now) I have so much trouble. My nipples are grazed and sore.

To get around this my husband bought a breastpump. My milk still hasn't quite come through so expressing is a bit of a long and boring process. I get about 20-25mls out and bottle feed it to him.

I woke up at 4.30am knowing he would want to feed shortly. So I got the pump ready and expressed 25mls which I later fed him. I changed him and expressed probably another 10mls but it doesn't seem to be enough...he's looking for more. My husband managed to finally help me latch him on properly and he breastfed for a little while. It was so hard...hurts like all hell because my nipples are grazed.

I would have thought for a 4 day old that what I was expressing was enough. Especially since they're only meant to have stomachs the size of a large marble at this stage.

Also when can I expect my milk to come through??

Any advice appreciated.

Thanks.

#2 Tall Poppy

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:13 AM

You are doing well, don't forget that. It is so very hard in the early days & it will get better, I promise.

I think you should call the ABA on 1800 MUM 2 MUM, they're trained counsellors & will give you some ideas if things to try.

Good luck & enjoy your new little baby  original.gif



#3 spottydog

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:25 AM

Oh electric blue,

I just came in to look for some old threads of post a new one on a very similar if not identical topic.

I dont want to gatecrash but ill just add my little story too if you dont mind OP.

DS is nearly 48hrs old, we came home 4 hrs after the birth and i thought he was feeding right until home visit yesterday and my nipples are sore and grazed too from poor attatchement. Apparently im feeding bub right, but the latch isint right. I had to express colostrum and syringe feed overnight, aswell as trying to put bub on breast but it was too sore. He is content atm, and im having another home visit today, will ask for advice.

Electric blue, do you have a home visit? Or can you make a appointment for one or a lactation consultant?

PS congrats on your new arrival, we were both prelabouring at the end of last week together. original.gif

Im sure ill see you around the boards.

spottydog.

#4 Clever Clogs

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:25 AM

The first few weeks can be hard. I agree to try the ABA as they might have some help for you.

Some things to try:
- let your nipples dry, with breast milk on them, in the open. This can help them heal much faster than if you put anything on them
- skin to skin contact will help stimulate your body to produce more milk (four days is still early). If you are somewhere hot, you might like to run a warm bath and take baby in with you, or just take your top off and lie on a bed with baby.
- if you have people coming over all the time, perhaps ask if they can wait a few more days. It will hopefully make you less stressed
- nipple shields can really help if you have grazed nipples. They aren't too expensive. They can help your baby improve his latch. I used them every second feed for a week and I think they really helped.
- even though it can be stressful, try to get a good latch every time you feed baby. Make sure they have a wide mouth, nipple to the back, tongue right out etc. if you know someone who has breastfed they may be able to help out, checking your latch. A LC would be better but I am not sure if you can find one on a public weekend.

Ideally it would be better to keep baby feeding from the breast, as long term expressing is hard and sometimes impossible. Just keep trying as much as you can and try to encourage your DH to do skin to skin with baby when you need to sleep.

#5 LifesGood

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:28 AM

OP it is hard and it does hurt in the early days, but you need some professional help with getting your baby properly latched. Call your MCHN and find out if there is a breast feeding clinic you can attend. It is really important to get the proper attachment happening otherwise your nipples will get increasingly damaged.It's hard to explain proper latching without being there.

Can you afford a private lactation consultant to come to your home? If so it is a really worthwhile investment.

Your milk should be through today or tomorrow - sooner if your baby sucks at the breast rather than pumping.

Good luck and congratulations, it sounds like you are doing a great job


#6 spottydog

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:30 AM

QUOTE (mavisandjack @ 28/01/2013, 07:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The first few weeks can be hard. I agree to try the ABA as they might have some help for you.

Some things to try:
- let your nipples dry, with breast milk on them, in the open. This can help them heal much faster than if you put anything on them
- skin to skin contact will help stimulate your body to produce more milk (four days is still early). If you are somewhere hot, you might like to run a warm bath and take baby in with you, or just take your top off and lie on a bed with baby.
- if you have people coming over all the time, perhaps ask if they can wait a few more days. It will hopefully make you less stressed
- nipple shields can really help if you have grazed nipples. They aren't too expensive. They can help your baby improve his latch. I used them every second feed for a week and I think they really helped.
- even though it can be stressful, try to get a good latch every time you feed baby. Make sure they have a wide mouth, nipple to the back, tongue right out etc. if you know someone who has breastfed they may be able to help out, checking your latch. A LC would be better but I am not sure if you can find one on a public weekend.

Ideally it would be better to keep baby feeding from the breast, as long term expressing is hard and sometimes impossible. Just keep trying as much as you can and try to encourage your DH to do skin to skin with baby when you need to sleep.



QUOTE (LifesGood @ 28/01/2013, 07:28 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
OP it is hard and it does hurt in the early days, but you need some professional help with getting your baby properly latched. Call your MCHN and find out if there is a breast feeding clinic you can attend. It is really important to get the proper attachment happening otherwise your nipples will get increasingly damaged.It's hard to explain proper latching without being there.

Can you afford a private lactation consultant to come to your home? If so it is a really worthwhile investment.

Your milk should be through today or tomorrow - sooner if your baby sucks at the breast rather than pumping.

Good luck and congratulations, it sounds like you are doing a great job


Gatecrasher here..

But thank you both for these bits of info, im off to google lactation consultants in my area and may have to think about shields too, i used them with DD but stopped feeding as it was all too much. sad.gif

spottydog.


#7 bikingbubs

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:34 AM

The first couple of weeks are really hard.  I found both times it was just a matter of pushing through it, because lets face it...grazed bleeding nipples arent exactly high of my list of things I ever wanted.
My suggestion to soothe the pain is hydrogel breast pads - they sell them at coles.  Put them in the fridge - and they will feel like bliss.  Also lasinoh after every feed, along with trying to give them as much air time as possible.
I know its SO hard in the early days, but try to feed from your breasts as much as you can tolerate as babies are much better at bringing in milk than a breast pump is.
It will get better xx

#8 Wacky Wobbler

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:39 AM

I would be getting professional help too.

I unfortunately couldn't bf due to latching issues which I think with help we could of overcome eventually (I live in the country and getting to see a LC is like finding a needle in a haystack). I express all of my DS feeds but it is very time consuming and quiet frankly can be a pain in the but.

My milk didn't come in till day 6. I would also maybe limiting visits by friends/relatives if that is an issue. I was a prude when people were around and just couldn't relax enough to bf in front of everyone.

Also if you do express I find most of my milk comes at night. Make sure you drain both breasts and I found pumping every time my DS fed was beneficial in keeping up my supply.

Good luck and I am sure you are doing a great job.

#9 Ice Queen

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:50 AM

The hospital I gave birth at had a nurse where you could have follow up appts a week after going home.  Ring your hospital and find out.

The nurse I saw with DS was amazing.  She had me attached properly in no time!

CYH nurses are great too but can be busy.  Call your local office and see if you can get a home visit.

#10 Mrs Dinosaurus

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:56 AM

Attachment is the key to pain free breastfeeding. I was you with number one and I am furious that you have been sent home without   proper attachment or your milk coming in.

The hospital or birthing centre that you birthed at have a duty to you so you can start with their lactation consultant for free. If, like me, you don't get any joy there you can try another public hospital for free (there may be a short wait which feels like eternity when you''re in pain)  or a private LC if you can afford it.

In the meantime you need gel pads, mothers mates, rite aid or similar - they are cooling and healing and will heal your nipple in a short time.

For practical help with attachment the ABA website and you tube hothouse have very helpful videos to copy.

All the best, I remember the pain well.

Oh, and you're baby wants more because in those early days they grow and change very quickly as they get used to life outside the womb.  You are doing an AWESOME job feeding him, it is really hard but honestly does get easier and pain free and then you can enjoy all the rewards of breastfeeding.



#11 Kay1

Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:57 AM

Yes you are doing well, hang in there! This is very normal for a 4 day old. But given that your nipples are sore and cracked I would highly highly recommend you seek some help. A lactation consultant is worth their weight in gold. You should be able to access one through the hospital you birthed at or through the local early childhood health centre. Organisations like Tresillian etc also have them on staff. Make some calls and see who you can find. There are a lot of resources out there to help with breastfeeding, you just need to get into the system.

I have had three kids, for all three my milk has not come in fully til about 3 weeks (this is later than normal). As my kids were losing weight I had to pump and supplement with expressed breast milk if I had enough and formula if not. It is very hard work and even harder if your nipples are sore or cracked (I had this with one baby). A lactation consultant can help with your attachment so that your nipples aren't as sore. If you are sore his attachment is not quite right which will also slow your milk coming in. With my munchy baby I found a large cherry shaped dummy in between feeds helped his mouth shape.

I know this time is very hard (I've done it three times) but if you really want to make breastfeeding work then seek help and it will get better. Despite very difficult beginnings I have successfully breastfed all three of mine.

Good luck. bbighug.gif

Edited by Kay1, 28 January 2013 - 07:03 AM.


#12 Jenferal

Posted 28 January 2013 - 07:12 AM

Has your baby been checked for a tongue tie? Could that be why there's a problem with latching? Some ties are further back so are harder to pick up on.
You can try lactation cookies and fenugreek tea to help with the milk production.

#13 Electric_Blue

Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:09 AM

Thanks for your help.

I have a midwife due out today at some point. They can't give a time as they do the rounds and you never know how long it's going to take.

I noticed both my breasts are soft when I was trying to express again (after expressing twice and managing to breastfeed him for 10 to 15mins twice) I think they're empty atm!

I then put my finger in his mouth and he was quite happy to suck away and drift off to sleep...I figure if my breasts are empty and he's happy just to suck my finger then he couldn't be hungry so I thought I'd try a dummy.

And it appears to have worked. I boiled up a dummy I bought the other week and gave it to him. He's back in his cot and quite happy.

Maybe he just needed comfort? I will talk about it to the midwife today.

3 hours sleep for me....I will have to try and squeeze in a few hours later today.

And yes, we have a lot of visitors coming. I sent a message to a few people asking them to come another time. However DH's family is from various places...his parents are a 4.5 hr drive away and his Dad has been working in WA. So he flew over to meet him. Not only that...but DH's Dad is coming over to replace wood which is rotting on the pergola out the back....a job which desperately needs doing and he's very rarely available due to his work in WA. (I should probably mention I live in Melbourne to give you an idea how far he's travelled) My Dad is also helping my FIL get this job done. So really I'll have to put up with it another day. People go back to work tomorrow so it'll most likely just be DH, DS and I.

Edited by Electric_Blue, 28 January 2013 - 08:16 AM.


#14 MummyIHK

Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:23 AM

If anyone is looking for an LC in the south eastern suburbs of Melbourne I can make a recommendation, just PM me if you would like the details.  I was considering full time EBM in the early days of breastfeeding as it was just so painful (I thought that was normal).  Thankfully when bub was only 10 days old I called an LC, over two hours she showed me how to latch bub on and literally from that moment on the pain subsided and bub and I had a wonderful bf relationship until he was six months old (when I had to suddenly stop because of health reasons)  sad.gif   I can tell you that it was the best $140 I have ever spent.

#15 Tesseract

Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:26 AM

1. Call your hospital and ask to see their lactation consultant asap.
2. Call the ABA for tips and ideas in the mean time. If you don't click with the counsellor call back again and speak to someone else.
3. If things ate still not right hire a private LC.

The first weeks can be really rough. But it's essential that you reach out for help that is available. It is possible (and better) to fix problems before they get out of control, but this often requires very experienced help.

If baby isn't feeding and you don't feel good, then please get some advice. What you're going through is very normal and there are lots of things that can be done, just don't fumble along on your own if you don't have to.

Keep us updated if you can!

Ask the best, Tess

#16 ubermum

Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:35 AM

I know it hurts, believe me. After 3 different breastfeeding experiences, 2 of which killed in the early days, I get it. However, the biggest key to getting your milk to come is is getting the baby on the breast. Your breasts are never truly empty. They are continually making milk, so once a baby switches from the second breast, there will already be a little milk in the first breast. Hang in there. If you attach your baby and it hurts because you think attachment is wrong, take them off and re-attach. It's annoying for you both, but getting the attachment right and preventing damage.

Stick with it op. This early stage can really suck and when you are in it. It seems like it is going on forever and will never be right. In a few months, this time will seem like a blur that was over so fast. Get your dh to pick up some hydrogel breast pads from the supermarket or pharmacy and keep them in the fridge. Pop them on after a feed. They are so soothing. In the meantime, feed from the breast as much as possible, and have as much skin and close body contact with your baby as you can to stimulate that milk to come in.

#17 lucky 2

Posted 28 January 2013 - 10:03 AM

Just adding that at 4 days of age the usual time for more crying and less sleeping is in the night (often btn the hrs of 11-12 mn and 4-5 am) so this can make you doubt yourself, ie you've fed but b is still hungry! It's normal newborn behaviour to be like that.
You will need rest in the day considering the night duty demands for this first 2-3 weeks so having visitors all day is not ideal, you need naps too.
Good luck your your mw visit today, she will weigh your baby and advise your on postitioning, attachment and whatever else is needed.
Until bfing is effortless and comfortable I think it is wise to express after feeds, you will then be helping your breasts for continue to make as much milk as possible and have some extra milk to give your baby if he needs it.

Early days, you'll both get through it.
All the best.

nb, I have moved your topic from the Birth-6 months forum into the Breastfeeding forum

#18 Felix101

Posted 28 January 2013 - 10:23 AM

Firstly, your doing such a great job OP! The early days are hard work!

I couldn't attach at all for the first couple of weeks of feeding, so was doing lots and lots of expressing. I remember on about day three, just before my milk came, I had expressed and fed colostrum and DS was grizzling and grumbling and just generally unsettled. I thought it was because I didn't have enough to fill him up. He ended up sucking on my finger and went to sleep. It was then I learnt about comfort sucking! original.gif sounds like your bub is doing the same. I see you've introduced a dummy (we did the same thing), so hopefully that helps in the short term.

In the long term, what everyone else has said - see a LC as soon as possible.

Once we did attach I also got a lot of nipple damage, which I remedied with nipple shields (but only use these if you get shown how to by a LC, and once your milk has come in), kenacomb ointment (or lansinoh, but kenacomb was my saviour - u need a script for it tho), putting breastmilk on my nipples and drying in the sun. Oh, and no visitors until I was starting to get on top of all this (about three weeks).

Good luck original.gif

#19 ez21

Posted 28 January 2013 - 10:27 AM

Hi electric blue.  You've been given plenty of good advice already but just wanted to say keep up the good work.  DS1 gave me similar problems and we worked through them with the right help and advice.  There is hope and you are doing a great job, even though you may not feel that way.

Early days can be a pain in the bum, but it will get better.

All the best.  Let us know how you get on.



#20 CharliMarley

Posted 28 January 2013 - 10:42 AM

The others have given you some great advice, particularly getting a lactation consultant to watch you feed and give you tips on latch-on. This is the most crucial part of learning to breastfeed and the pump can never get out as much as the baby can. Your body is geared to provide breastmilk from birth, with the colostrum that is there until your milk comes in and as babies only have a tiny tummy (as big as a marble in the first couple of days) and this colostrum is sufficient for your baby's needs. When the milk arrives the baby needs to be put to the breast as often as possible (2 hourly) to help with your milk production and the more you feed, the more milk will be made. At the end of the day, you may feel that there is not enough milk there, but the baby can always get some out and it is just a matter of constantly breastfeeding and letting the baby stay with you overnight. If you feel that your baby needs to comfort suck, let him quietly suck your nipple as he goes to sleep and you won't have any problems with dummies. However, the latch is the most important, because some babies are sucking but not latching properly and they are not milking the breasts as they should and therefore your body is thinking it is not needed, so it will stop making so much.

#21 Tooties

Posted 28 January 2013 - 10:44 AM

My bub is 4 weeks so I'm not far past where you're at.

Lots of good advice about getting the attachment right.

To get my milk through, I also just stuck the boob in bub's mouth whenever she squarked. Sometimes as she attached it was toe-curlingly painful, then it would subside as we worked ourselves out.

The only other thing I could add that helped me deal with the pain and grazing was moo goo nipple ointment (mudder udder I think its called) - has lots of great stuff in it and doesn't need to be removed before a feed.

Good luck, it really is hard work, isn't it!

#22 axiomae

Posted 28 January 2013 - 10:54 AM

Just want to comment that I was like you - home a few hours after giving birth, all alone for the first few days of breastfeeding - it sucked!

I would have stayed in hospital if I had have known the difficulties I would face with breastfeeding - poor attachment, low supply (which has never really been remedied) sigh.

Our system fails mothers in this sense. They want us to breastfeed but don't support us. Makes me so mad. For number 2 Ill be staying in hospital as long as I can!

#23 CharliMarley

Posted 28 January 2013 - 11:20 AM

QUOTE (axiomae @ 28/01/2013, 11:54 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Just want to comment that I was like you - home a few hours after giving birth, all alone for the first few days of breastfeeding - it sucked!

I would have stayed in hospital if I had have known the difficulties I would face with breastfeeding - poor attachment, low supply (which has never really been remedied) sigh.

Our system fails mothers in this sense. They want us to breastfeed but don't support us. Makes me so mad. For number 2 Ill be staying in hospital as long as I can!


I second this post. When I had my babies, we stayed in the hospital for 7 days and breastfeeding was well established before we came home and new mums need people who are experienced to be there all the time (overnight too).

Mums are given a raw deal these days and it is no wonder the breastfeeding rates drop off like they do.

#24 Jenferal

Posted 28 January 2013 - 12:59 PM

I have to say I find it strange mothers are home within hours of giving birth, but are then expected to BF from the start with little help around them. A MW popping in each day doesn't really account for the other hours of no help at all in my mind. One hour visit doesn't help if you've struggled with a screaming baby for 23 hours till that point.
I honestly think you should at least be in hospital 24hrs to make sure latch and feeds are going ok. Especially these days when not many of our mother's generation BF and can't help a struggling mother.

OP, my SiL's milk didn't come in till day 9 for her first baby and day 12 for her second(or the other way round, I forget lol).
She ended up having to supplement with formula for a week or so till her supply was going.

#25 icekool

Posted 28 January 2013 - 07:57 PM

Did you use Lansinoh cream on your breast after and b/f feeding?
My milk came in on the 5th day.

B/feeding (apparently I had great breast for breastfeeding according the m/w's and the attachment etc was all correct) but it hurt for the first 3 months for our first 2 babies. #3, about the first 2 months.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

Special offer: The Baby & Toddler Show 2014

At The Baby & Toddler Show, you?ll find everything you need to get ready for your new arrival and guide you through the early weeks and years of parenting.

The 'no children' wedding invite

It was the wedding of one of my oldest and dearest friends, and she had invited me to be her bridesmaid. It was quite an honour. But there was one problem.

Baby Dylan recovering well after spending five days alone

 For up to five days he lay alone after his mother died of a suspected drug overdose, but eight-month-old Dylan Micallef has made an incredible recovery.

The mystery of William Tyrell, little boy lost

The question remains: How does a little boy simply vanish without a trace?

Woman fights off robber, then gives birth

A thief in the US got more than he bargained for when he try to rob a woman who was nine months pregnant because he figured she would be an easy target.

Video: Two-year-old tells mum off for laughing at her

This little girl is not happy that her mum started laughing during her performance - so she tells her exactly how she feels about it.

Coping with a bolter

My 15-month-old has suddenly added a burst of real speed to her toddle. She should be classed a flight risk.

Single, 51 and pregnant

Tracey Kahn didn't realise she wanted to become a mother until she was well into her 40s. Now 51, she is pregnant with her second child.

An open letter to Tony Abbott: please salvage our super

We face financial ruin, but most of us don?t realise it. If we don?t act together to salvage our superannuation, I have no doubt the new GFC will be the Girls? Financial Crisis.

'I'm happy to know I'm changing lives': surrogate mum of two

I know that once the baby is born, I will focus on the gift I have given, and watch the parents with their new child. I can't wait for that day.

Birth trauma and the issue of informed consent

There is a perception that women should just be happy they have a healthy baby in their arms. But for women who experienced birth trauma, there's a lot more to it.

Tips for managing pollen allergies and hayfever

They're simple tips, but they can have a big impact on those who suffer from hayfever and pollen allergies.

Ada Nicodemou shares tribute to her stillborn baby

Just over one month since Ada Nicodemou and her husband lost their second son, the Home and Away star has shared a touching poem for her baby.

Mum causes stir breastfeeding on train

?To the woman breastfeeding her kid on the train. Seriously! On the train?" began the letter of complaint.

10 things they don?t tell you about being pregnant

As I slowly waddle my ever-changing pregnant body towards the finishing line of my due date, it?s becoming increasingly clear there are a lot of things they just don?t tell you about pregnancy.

Overcoming a fear of the dark

A toddler's fear of the dark is very normal, but there are ways parents can help children through this stage in their development.

Kids, TV and movies: how young is too young?

It seems you don't have to throw the TV and iPad out the window - it all boils down to moderation, supervision and interaction.

Video: Baby's first birthday is a special day for mum, too

?A baby?s first birthday is also mum?s first birthday.?

The day Supernanny came to tea

Prince William's favourite celebrity child trainer Jo Frost puts Bryony Gordon and her toddler through their paces.

The words I hated hearing as new mum

It was less than a week after my son was born that I first heard it - from my mother.

To the pharmacist who sold me baby formula

On the rare occasion I catch sight of you at school, or around town, I think back to our earliest exchange. I?m sure you have no recollection of it at all.

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

What's hot on EB

Special offer: The Baby & Toddler Show 2014

At The Baby & Toddler Show, you?ll find everything you need to get ready for your new arrival and guide you through the early weeks and years of parenting.

Losing yourself to motherhood

While watching your baby grow into a unique little person is exciting and wondrous, the intensity of meeting everyone else?s needs can ever so sneakily overtake your own needs for self-care.

Tearing during delivery: the facts

Almost all women will experience bruising, grazing or tearing after a vaginal birth. Depending on the degree of tearing, there are various treatments available.

6 tips for a day out with a baby and toddler

Outings can be lots of fun with the kids, but there are inevitable challenges. Here's some information about days out to help you be a little more prepared.

Why I invited a dozen people to watch my son's birth

I sent invitations on burgundy scrapbooking paper stamped with a field of poppies, and told each person why I wanted him or her there. I warned that there would be nudity.

Getting labour started: tips for a natural induction

When your baby?s due date comes and goes without so much as a pop - let alone a bang - it can be disheartening. Mums and a doula share their stories of natural inductions.

7 mistakes old hands make with new babies

As I sat across the table from my friend ? me, a seasoned mother of three; her, a brand new mum ? I thought of all the mistakes an old-hand parent can make when visiting a newborn baby.

That's my boy: a dad's diary of the first 4 months

Unbearable anxiety, unspeakable joy, constant exhaustion and bouts of frustration ... The many shocks of first-time fatherhood resound in a dad's diary of his son's early months.

One of the most important things a new mum can do

Finances may not be as cute as a newborn, but with many women?s working arrangements changing post-baby, monetary matters need attention too.

The 'no children' wedding invite

"It's her wedding, so the day is all about her, not your baby." How major fall-out can occur over a simple wedding invitation.

Personalised baby gifts

We've scoured the internet to find gorgeous personalised keepsakes and nursery decor to record baby name and dates. They make great gifts for christenings, name days and birthdays! (All prices in AU.)

 

Reader offer

2 FOR 1 TICKET OFFER

For Shopping, For Advice, For Baby & You. Enjoy a special day out with fabulous shopping from over 200 brands, leading parenting experts offering advice on a range of topics, and amazing children?s entertainment

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.