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Speech Therapy Woes *Updated*


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#1 ~chiquita~

Posted 25 January 2013 - 03:53 PM

Posted here for more traffic. tongue.gif

We've worked really hard with DS in the last 12 months and finally his receptive language is in the average range for his age. We had our first appointment with ST for the year and she asked me to start 'waiting' when he wants something, whether that be a snack, toy, me etc.

It's only been two days but this is really hard. I'm not expecting him to say the word but any verbalisation will do. He won't say anything at all. He just throws himself on the ground, hits things and starts to howl. sad.gif

I know every child is different but just wanted to get an idea of how long your child reacted like this before they started to attempt to speak? When will he get it?

Thanks

Edited by ~chiquita~, 08 February 2013 - 01:19 PM.


#2 FizzlingFireboxes

Posted 25 January 2013 - 04:40 PM

It's hard, we go through this with DS. His speechie has said the same thing, don't just give when he does his hand shake, or grunting or crying and pointing to wait for some verbalising, but when they have only known one way it's hard, especially when they don't understand.

I choose my times, and don't push it all the time. We have taught him to say 'more' so we try to get him to say that. So whenever we give him something we say 'more' first and try to get him to repeat.

We have seen improvement over a few months, but it also depends on his mood. original.gif



#3 opethmum

Posted 25 January 2013 - 04:55 PM

It is hard but the more you stand your ground the better the results. You need to drum into him that he needs to communicate and if he throws himself on the ground and has a tantrum then you deal with the tantrum and discipline accordingly. I know it is hard my DD did that and the first few weeks were rough but she now knows if she want something she asks for it.
My ST said that mealtimes and getting a bottle and water  and the essentials are not negotiable in that they can make non verbal cues to you and everything else is fair game in that they must give you a verbal cue to get it.
Unless if there is something else going on most kids can say what or motion and give verbal grunts it is the fact that they do not want to and being stubborn as they are will rail against you and they will throw everything at you because until now they have gotten everything that they want without having to ask or motion it lands in their laps. Your DS can do it you just have to keep motivated to push him through kicking and screaming for him to communicate appropriately his needs to you and others without the tantrums.
Good luck and keep hanging in there, it will get better.

#4 mez70

Posted 25 January 2013 - 10:05 PM

The other thing our speechie did with our DD was to teach her makaton Signing as well so she was learning the words and the signs for things. within a couple of weeks of starting speech and a faciliated playgroup for kids with S/N (where they also signed) we started noticing a huge improvement in her who demeanor as she learned the signs for things like more, finished, wait, stop, go eat, drink etc. It gave her and us 2 way conversation and I asked why and shouldn't we be pushing words, and what she said was that kids can often sign before they talk but as long as you use both together what will happen is as they "get" the word the sign will drop off which happened with us. The key was giving her a means of being understood once we were signing etc her frustration at not being understood subsided so communication became more pleasant to attempt.

I think it is harder for the primary care giver as we are so clued in to what they want and generally what the mean that without realising we can actually sabotage communication as we can and do anticpate the need or want. I was also enouraged to have DD around other kids as much as possible for her to model speech and communication. She was attending EI, and a EI playgroup. At their suggestion we joined a mainstream play group and then when preschool started she was in a double session 3 year old kinder group rather than the single session all with the aim of helping her model and learn. Kinder were great as she had no aide but they were able to understand her  attempts and also knew some basic signs as well....Good luck it will be harder on you than him


#5 Carmen02

Posted 26 January 2013 - 05:21 AM

ill choose your time when to push it and when not too, it is a tough thing for you both to go through! my 8yr old DS still has severe delay but he got very frustrated at me at times and still does! took quite sometime before I had him fully ask for things all the time.  my 2yr 3mth old DS still isnt saying anything at all i wish he would!

#6 ~chiquita~

Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:17 AM

Thanks for your replies everyone, I appreciate it.

QUOTE
If you're not doing it this way, I would highly   recommend it.  It 'flows' more, like a normal conversation rather than   insisting on them using words.  One thing our ST said was never say "use   your words" as that just creates pressure.  Put them in a situation   where they feel comfortable talking and they are doing it without really   thinking about it.  And we definitely responded to any attempts at   words.  So if I asked "do you want the apple or orange" and he replied   with "app", I would repeat "apple" and give it to him.

If he's   having big tanties over it, I personally would back off and just take   the pressure off.  Try playing with him, side by side, and attempt some   words.  It's far more relaxed and you can usually get them talking.


I think I may try it this way too. The last couple of days have been really stressful (for me anyway). The ST makes it look so easy although he did throw a hissy fit at her too. I'm waiting before I take him out of his cot in the morning, trying to get him to say mummum instead of whinging. He can say mum but doesn't call me mum to get my attention, it's grunting, shrieking etc. I'm also not getting up anymore when he grabs my hand and pulls me. I get pulled around the house a lot.

The kid is playing me though, he was so distressed I gave in yesterday and he stopped crying immediately. I have to toughen up, ignore the tantrum and be consistent. I just feel like such a meanie.  

I may look at finding another speechie too, I'm not sure if she's the right one. I like the idea of makaton signing too and I'll chat to daycare about it as well.

I wish I could pay someone to do it for me at home, I've no patience with this sort of thing. ph34r.gif

#7 Carmen02

Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:28 AM

QUOTE (~chiquita~ @ 26/01/2013, 08:17 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I may look at finding another speechie too, I'm not sure if she's the right one. I like the idea of makaton signing too and I'll chat to daycare about it as well.

I wish I could pay someone to do it for me at home, I've no patience with this sort of thing. ph34r.gif


good luck! If you dont feel the speechie is the right one defiently find another! thats important especially with dealing with important people original.gif
I wish someone would be available for that!!!!!! lol I have 2 with huge speech delays and no patience lol!

#8 Jenferal

Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:28 AM

I hear you on the no patience thing.
I was really slack over Christmas and just got out of the habit of doing the exercises with my daughter.
I just hate sitting there for the 10 to 20 minutes a day, every single day, doping the same stuff over and over.
Sends me back to my school days full of homework sad.gif

#9 baddmammajamma

Posted 26 January 2013 - 01:04 PM

I just want to chime in with good luck. We've had a related but different journey with our daughter, and man, those early days were the hardest. I just want you to know that you aren't alone and that I can feel your frustration. I bet your son is frustrated, too, for not being able to make his full needs known to you.

On that note, are you still in line to see your developmental paed again? Are you guys going to push ahead with the ASD assessment? I know you've raised concerns in the past, and if your son does actually have ASD, at least you would get the benefit of funding that might allow you to outsource a bit of the heavy lifting.

Thinking of you & hoping that there are brighter days ahead.

#10 LambChop

Posted 26 January 2013 - 02:05 PM

Do you sign or anything ?  Just wondered how receptive language was tested ?



#11 ~chiquita~

Posted 26 January 2013 - 02:57 PM

QUOTE (Madame Protart @ 26/01/2013, 01:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
OP, try doing the exercise in your every day   life rather than a separate exercise eg cooking, playing, reading,   cleaning up, etc.  I found sitting down purposefully to do the exercise   caused us both to be a bit stressed out.
And definitely find another Therapist if this one doesn't 'gel'.  For example, our Speechie told us to back right off if ds became frustrated as the one thing kids can control is what goes in and out of their mouth (food and speech) - you can't force them to eat, or talk.  And trying to is counter-productive and very stressful for you both.  It can often become a battle of wills, and you don't want that to happen.  ds sessions and exercises were fun and play time for him, I don't think he was aware it was a lesson at all.

Sitting down exercises make me nervous and stressed so I'm trying to incorporate it into daily tasks but he's not enjoying it. I can see he's uncomfortable. Yesterday was just awful, I was so upset. He lost his temper so many times I lost count. I think I'll start looking for a new ST.

QUOTE (baddmammajamma @ 26/01/2013, 02:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
On that note, are you still in line to see your developmental paed again? Are you guys going to push ahead with the ASD assessment? I know you've raised concerns in the past, and if your son does actually have ASD, at least you would get the benefit of funding that might allow you to outsource a bit of the heavy lifting.

Thinking of you & hoping that there are brighter days ahead.

Thanks BMJ, he was assessed by a clinical psychologist at RHW last month. Other than the expressive language delay she wasn't worried about him. She even wrote down numbers from 1 to 20 and watched as he correctly identified them all. She admitted she hadn't seen a 2 year old do that and thought it was great. shrug.gif
We have another appointment with Dr P next month and I will ask for the ASD assessment referral then. He can count to 25 (probably higher as I only have flash cards that go to 25), identifies numbers to 100 and knows the alphabet. He does say 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 10. The number fascination is still well and truly alive.

QUOTE (LambChop @ 26/01/2013, 03:05 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Do you sign or anything ?  Just wondered how receptive language was tested ?

No signing. Receptive language was tested by Bayley III Scales of Infant Development. Identifying pictures and objects, following simple directions, social routines and identifying action pictures.

#12 baddmammajamma

Posted 26 January 2013 - 03:59 PM

QUOTE (~chiquita~ @ 26/01/2013, 03:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Si
Thanks BMJ, he was assessed by a clinical psychologist at RHW last month. Other than the expressive language delay she wasn't worried about him. She even wrote down numbers from 1 to 20 and watched as he correctly identified them all. She admitted she hadn't seen a 2 year old do that and thought it was great. shrug.gif
We have another appointment with Dr P next month and I will ask for the ASD assessment referral then. He can count to 25 (probably higher as I only have flash cards that go to 25), identifies numbers to 100 and knows the alphabet. He does say 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 10. The number fascination is still well and truly alive.


chiquita, I'm totally not qualified to dx anything, but I do remember your earlier posts about your son's fascination with numbers plates and liking to watch the credits run on his favorite TV shows.

Did the psych or has your speech therapist raised the possibilty of hyperlexia at all? When you've got precocious mastery of letters/numbers + fascination with letters/numbers + speech delay, those are all potential signs of hyperlexia.

When my daughter started to read books she had never seen at age 2 -- but couldn't make a simple request for juice -- our paediatrician at the time simply marvelled at how "smart" she was. I had never heard of hyperlexia until I started looking around for resources for kids with speech delays who were precocious readers.

As I mentioned in your earlier thread about number plates, hyperlexia often co-exists with ASD, language disorders, SPD (some professionals believe that it must co-exist with something else -- while others think it can be a stand alone condition). Definitely worth mentioning to Dr. P .

http://csld.org/HyperlexiaDefinition.htm

http://judyanddavid.com/cha/whatishyperlexia.pdf

http://judyanddavid.com/cha/strategies.pdf

In the meantime, have you thought of using his fabulous letter recognition as a means of helping him communicate? We ended up labellng EVERYTHING in our house -- everything -- with big printed letters. My daughter was able to de-code the words and express what she wanted by reading them outloud -- we were able to leverage her love of and early mastery of letters and reading to help teach her to speak. Things like the Letter Factory DVDs (anything letter themed) helped as well.

Good luck making sense of everything!

#13 LambChop

Posted 26 January 2013 - 05:51 PM

Ok chiq, given all that other info, my best advice is... follow your instinct.  If you think it's just a tantrum, ride it through, if you think its more and he can't cope and he's melting down, then listen to your instinct.

You've done such an awesome job so far of being tapped in to what he needs, keep listening to yourself.

One thing I was thinking, given his level of comprehension - is he getting angry because he thinks he has communicated and you aren't listening, or is it because he doesn't know what is expected.  Or, he does know something is expected, but still not quite the right connections in his brain to respond ?

#14 baddmammajamma

Posted 26 January 2013 - 06:38 PM

...Oh yes, and definitely consider looking for a new speech therapist, as others have suggested, if your current one makes you uncomfortable. It's hard enough doing early intervention stuff without professionals around you who really "get" you and your child.

Hang in there!

#15 item

Posted 26 January 2013 - 06:58 PM

I don't have the energy to be anything but blunt:

- yes, find a new speechie!!!  You need someone you feel comfortable with when working on any early intervention
- I second the sign language.  My BFF's son had a delay and started talking soon after introducing the sign system - he could communicate his wants and needs, pressure was off and he was able to learn to speak
- intelligence does not preclude an ASD dx (in fact it can mask symptoms of ASD for YEARS).  If you are or have ever been worried about ASD, get AN EXPERT IN ASD to do a full assessment on your child.  As a PP pointed out, if it changes nothing in your approach to EI then at least you may receive some funds to help outsource/intensify the EI.  Having said that, a dx may well change the approach you take as you more fully understand your childs profile.

Good luck.  Keep asking questions, keep pushing for more info and hang in there original.gif

#16 ~chiquita~

Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:09 PM

QUOTE (baddmammajamma @ 26/01/2013, 04:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Did the psych or has your speech therapist raised the possibilty of hyperlexia at all? When you've got precocious mastery of letters/numbers + fascination with letters/numbers + speech delay, those are all potential signs of hyperlexia.

Neither of them did. I was disappointed with the psych who said she'd never seen it before but thought it was awesome. mad.gif I mentioned it to the ST last week and she said great, use it as an exercise to motivate him to speak. Count steps, etc. We already do that!

QUOTE
When my daughter started to read books she had never seen at age 2 -- but couldn't make a simple request for juice -- our paediatrician at the time simply marvelled at how "smart" she was. I had never heard of hyperlexia until I started looking around for resources for kids with speech delays who were precocious readers.

MIL shows this skill off to all and sundry, 'he can't talk but watch him do this, he is so clever'. I hate it, it's like a dog performing tricks. He says mummum and knows who I am but won't call me mum.

I know you posted about hyperlexia before but at the time his number plate obsession had just started. I've just read those links and done some googling and it all fits. I look around the room and it is filled with toys and flashcards with letters and numbers. He picks up his magnetic numbers and manipulates them from 1 and 2, to 12, to 21 etc. He'll say 1 and hold up 1 finger, and so on, up to 5. DS gets very excited when he sees logos too. His memory amazes me. I was stunned when I learnt he knew the alphabet, because I didn't teach him that. I think he over gestures as well. He's also hyposensitive, he still mouths thing and he loves pressure, sticks his head between my   knees to squeeze huh.gif , and pulls the cushions off the lounge, covers himself with them and then wants me to squish him in there.

QUOTE
In the meantime, have you thought of using his fabulous letter recognition as a means of helping him communicate? We ended up labellng EVERYTHING in our house -- everything -- with big printed letters. My daughter was able to de-code the words and express what she wanted by reading them outloud -- we were able to leverage her love of and early mastery of letters and reading to help teach her to speak. Things like the Letter Factory DVDs (anything letter themed) helped as well.

No, but I'm willing to give it a try! I think this might work, he will say numbers when prompted so there's no harm in trying with letters.

QUOTE (LambChop @ 26/01/2013, 06:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ok chiq, given all that other info, my best advice is... follow your instinct.  If you think it's just a tantrum, ride it through, if you think its more and he can't cope and he's melting down, then listen to your instinct.

You've done such an awesome job so far of being tapped in to what he needs, keep listening to yourself.

One thing I was thinking, given his level of comprehension - is he getting angry because he thinks he has communicated and you aren't listening, or is it because he doesn't know what is expected.  Or, he does know something is expected, but still not quite the right connections in his brain to respond ?

Thanks LC. My instinct for some time has been something is not quite right. I don't think this is the right approach to get him to talk.  I'm not sure with that question tbh. It's either he thinks he has communicated or he doesn't know how to respond. He gestures very well, if he wants water he puts up his water bottle and yells. If I miss that cue he'll yell again and put his bottle on the sink, if he wants milk he'll drag me to the fridge and try to lift the milk out. I've noticed he has trouble imitating faces I make and he still can't blow.  

QUOTE
I don't have the energy to be anything but blunt:

- yes, find a new speechie!!!  You need someone you feel comfortable with when working on any early intervention
-   I second the sign language.  My BFF's son had a delay and started   talking soon after introducing the sign system - he could communicate   his wants and needs, pressure was off and he was able to learn to speak
-   intelligence does not preclude an ASD dx (in fact it can mask symptoms   of ASD for YEARS).  If you are or have ever been worried about ASD, get   AN EXPERT IN ASD to do a full assessment on your child.  As a PP pointed   out, if it changes nothing in your approach to EI then at least you may   receive some funds to help outsource/intensify the EI.  Having said   that, a dx may well change the approach you take as you more fully   understand your childs profile.


Thanks for your reply item. I've got an appointment in a few weeks with an ASD expert and I'll push for the assessment, she doesn't know about the number fascination yet and I know she'll be interested to hear about it. His OT is great, she gets more sounds out of him than anyone so no issues there. I'm going to mention to our current ST that I think he may have hyperlexia and see if we can do things different. If not, I'll take him back to his original ST.  

Thank you all so much! This might sound strange but I'm actually a little excited! I'll keep you all updated. original.gif

Sorry for the long post.

#17 trinyweeny

Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:18 PM

Well, it IS exciting to feel like you're getting closer to finding out how your child 'ticks'. Best wishes OP and keep us posted.

#18 item

Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:26 PM

Well, it IS exciting to feel like you're getting closer to finding out how your child 'ticks'. Best wishes OP and keep us posted



NBC, this is my post, EB has had a security problem and for some reason my post came up as though from someone else's account.

A bit scary, log out then back in to fix. Who can see my PM's and account details I wonder?

#19 baddmammajamma

Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:28 PM

chiquita:

I'm glad that the links are helpful & giving you something more to present to your team of professionals (I have a fellow EBer to thank for those). Hyperlexia is just one of those things that doesn't seem to be well understood. I can totally relate to your frustration with the "performing dog tricks" -- when we were awaiting J's first ASD assessment, my friends would ask if they could give her big words to read (she was 2). It was like some weird party trick. All the while, I'm thinking "Man, I just wish that my kid would say 'Hi Mom.'"

The good thing about a comprehensive ASD assessment is that the process -- if done by someone who really knows their stuff and uses gold standard tools- should answer more questions than it raises. Even if your son ends up not being on the spectrum, I suspect you will get some very valuable insights out of the process.

Glad you are feeling more empowered than overwhelmed. I agree with trinyweeny: it IS exciting to get closer to how your child ticks!

Good luck & please keep us posted.

#20 Swelle

Posted 27 January 2013 - 06:44 AM

I can totally relate to the confusing world that is hyperlexia and the links bmj has posted are a great start point if you think your child might be displaying some hyperlexic traits. My son was classically hyperlexic as a baby but I didnt realise it. He was my first child and my husband and I are avid readers so I thought it was clever and cute that he made letters, numbers and patterns. He scripted and chunked like a champion and asked a baziilion questions to avoid expressing original thought himself, no-one at his kindy even realised he had a language problem. His memorisation and rote skills were/are something else. He was tested for giftedness aged 5 which was where some asd flags popped up and we started on our journey of pddnos with hyperlexia. It was at our first speech appt our wonderful speechie mentioned hyperlexia. I initially dismissed it a bit as my son has good comprehension but as I started reading about hyperlexia it was like a light going on. Hyperlexic kids have a fascination with letters and numbers that starts early. They often enjoy finding letters, reading logos, playing with letters and numbers well before they are conversational. The easiset way I can think to explain it is that letters, words and math code are their first language, spoken English is their second. They pick up numbers letters and words easier than verbals. As young children they range from being very interested to being quite obsessed with letters, words and numbers. Expressive speech often lags relative to receptive. Early speech is often scripted, echoic and learned in chunks. Once language foundations are taught and assimilated there can be very rapid progress across language, social skills and emotional regulation.  It tends to be associated with very good outcomes especially in kids with a hfa profile. Its something that really helped us understand my son, how he thinks, how he learns and to work with his teachers as well as target our therapies for the best outcomes for him. All my very best for your therapy with him and moving forwards. If it turns out he has some hyperlexic elements there are some good resources out there to help enagage him in learning original.gif

#21 rocketsurgeon

Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:03 PM

Hi OP, I’ve read some of your previous threads and think you’re doing a great job on following through with therapy and appointments for your son.

I agree that you should find another speech therapist. My son has seen a total of 6 now, the one we have stuck with was the 4th but we saw others who came recommended or from waiting lists and though they may have been technically good, they just didn’t connect with our son. Having that rapport is so important as it made him comfortable and more willing to engage and therefore benefit from the sessions.

My son also had severe language delay and the way we increased his expressive language was to model simple language around him that he could not just understand, but hopefully imitate, and giving him choices wherever possible. We would also wait out for a request, be it verbal or otherwise. As his language improved, we would expand it from “outside?” to modelling “I want to go outside”. As his language improved, we reduced the modelling and prompts and would just wait for him to express himself. It has been hard going but he has caught up, and then some. His language was recently assessed as high average, so we went from severely delayed to high average in just over a year.

Hyperlexia has also been raised with our son, but his diagnosis is a stand alone PDD-NOS. His love of numbers and letters have a clear advantage eg he has taught himself how to count to 10 in 4 languages through playing on his ipad lol

Hang in there, it does get easier when the “therapy team” falls into place.

#22 songshirah

Posted 29 January 2013 - 04:32 PM

I second using word cards (not pictures) as a communication tool.  On an index card, in big red print, write a word for something you know he really, really, likes.  Could be a car, freddo, bubbles - anything you know he doesn't get often, but finds really exciting and motivating.  If he loves jumping on the trampoline, write 'jump'. If it's a dinosaur he loves, write 'dinosaur'.  You get the idea.  

Show him the card and the object it represents when you think he's calm and listening.  He may or may not look at what you're doing.  It doesn't matter at this point.  Hopefully, it'll capture his interest and he'll catch on.

PM me if you want more ideas.  (I have AS and was/am hyperlexic and this is exactly how I learned to talk.)

#23 ~chiquita~

Posted 29 January 2013 - 07:55 PM

Thanks for all your replies, they've been really helpful.

Our appointment with Dr P is on the 8th February, so it's not far away at all. Gawd, I hope she gives me that referral and doesn't fob me off for another 6 months. I know I can get him assessed without it but we've hit our medicare safety net threshold for the year and that referral would be really handy.

QUOTE
The good thing about a comprehensive ASD   assessment is that the process -- if done by someone who really knows   their stuff and uses gold standard tools- should answer more questions   than it raises. Even if your son ends up not being on the spectrum, I   suspect you will get some very valuable insights out of the process.

I'm all for it. I just want to know what's going on now, if it's nothing we can get on with our lives and if he is on the spectrum I can figure out how his mind works and get assistance to help him.

I managed to download a copy of The Letter Factory yesterday. Due to the foul weather in Sydney I played it three times. ph34r.gif He loved it. By the end of it he was attempting to imitate the sounds of quite a few letters. I was really happy with that.

QUOTE (Fredi @ 29/01/2013, 03:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Having that rapport is so important as it made him comfortable and more willing to engage and therefore benefit from the sessions.

That's a lot of ST's! He's currently being seen by Community Health and he's opening the door not long after he's been there. I have to move a chair in front of the door to stop him escaping. His OT gets more sounds out of him, but that is more a play based session, lots of crash bags, swings and he loves all that stuff...and that's when we get results.

QUOTE
My son also had severe language delay and the way we increased his expressive language was to model simple language around him that he could not just understand, but hopefully imitate, and giving him choices wherever possible. We would also wait out for a request, be it verbal or otherwise. It has been hard going but he has caught up, and then some. His language was recently assessed as high average, so we went from severely delayed to high average in just over a year.

That's brilliant, sounds like you've worked really hard. Which words do I pick when all he is doing is babbling? I hear very few consonants. He says car (he loves cars), oo oo for train and numbers, makes animals sounds e.g, neigh, meow. I thought he would try to imitate bikky to get one, but he just decided it was too hard yesterday, had a whinge and ran away!

QUOTE (songshirah @ 29/01/2013, 05:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I second using word cards (not pictures) as a communication tool.  On an index card, in big red print, write a word for something you know he really, really, likes.  Could be a car, freddo, bubbles - anything you know he doesn't get often, but finds really exciting and motivating.  If he loves jumping on the trampoline, write 'jump'. If it's a dinosaur he loves, write 'dinosaur'.  You get the idea.  

Show him the card and the object it represents when you think he's calm and listening.  He may or may not look at what you're doing.  It doesn't matter at this point.  Hopefully, it'll capture his interest and he'll catch on.

PM me if you want more ideas.  (I have AS and was/am hyperlexic and this is exactly how I learned to talk.)

Thanks songshirah, I'd love more ideas, I'll PM you. I'm really going to have to think about what interests him other than numbers and cars. I tried writing a few things down for him yesterday. All his number flashcards have the words written on them, he spends so much time playing with them I thought he would recognise them but he didn't.

Edited by ~chiquita~, 29 January 2013 - 07:56 PM.


#24 baddmammajamma

Posted 29 January 2013 - 08:33 PM

QUOTE (~chiquita~ @ 29/01/2013, 08:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for all your replies, they've been really helpful.

Our appointment with Dr P is on the 8th February, so it's not far away at all. Gawd, I hope she gives me that referral and doesn't fob me off for another 6 months. I know I can get him assessed without it but we've hit our medicare safety net threshold for the year and that referral would be really handy.


Short of Dr. P making the diagnosis herself (some paeds are well versed & perfectly comfortable/competent in doing so), you will have to explore another option.

Tell her that you want to have that referral just in case you continue to have concerns. With waiting times what they are, it's important that you leave the office with some paper in your hand so that you aren't stuck waiting another 6 or 12 months!

A few options:

http://www.autismspectrum.org.au/images/Ap..._-_May_2012.pdf

* Use the team at ASPECT. To get the Medicare & PHI rebates, you will have to be referred by a paed or psychiatrist. A diagnosis of ASD by ASPECT will automatically qualify your son for the  "Helping Children With Autism" package ("HCWA" -- $12,000 in early intervention funding, plus other small benefits)

http://www.autismspectrum.org.au/index.php...&Itemid=547

* Ask for a referral to a psych who specializes in ASD assessments (I'd be happy to provide some good ones). However, in order for their diagnosis to qualify a child for the HCWA, it needs to be signed off on by a paed or psychiatrist - OR - it needs to be co-conducted with a speech therapist and jointly signed by the psych and speech therapist

* Or, you can seek either a developmental paed or psychiatrist who is comfortable conducting the assessment process alone

Of the above options, ASPECT is probably your best bet. They use gold standard tools, as (likely) would a psych who specializes in ASD and related issues.

Good luck!

PS: songshirah, how fascinating to get your perspectives! My daughter learned to speak exactly the same way!

#25 ~chiquita~

Posted 08 February 2013 - 01:18 PM

We saw Dr P today, she wants to see him in 3 months time and she will assess him herself. She knew of the psychologist DS saw at his last development assessment at RHW and said she was very good and knew her stuff.

In the meantime, she's given me 2 SRS-2 Profile Sheets, one for me to fill out and one for daycare. She has also given me a referral to a speechie with an interest in ASD to come to our home so she can assess him.

We are probably looking at a PDD-NOS diagnosis. So we're still waiting, but getting closer. original.gif


Edited by ~chiquita~, 08 February 2013 - 01:31 PM.





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