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Teaching young ones address phone number
Met with CHN and told they should know it by now!


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#1 mmuc83

Posted 24 January 2013 - 11:53 AM

Hello!

I had a meeting with my CHN and she asked whether my DS2 who is 3 knew his name, where he lived and phone number?

I said he know his name, but not the rest.

She then asked about my DS1 who is 5.. i said he knows his age, half of our address and doesn't know phone number.....

she then said that i must teach them this asap esp my DS2......

so... at what age should they know this stuff?  Any recommendations on how to teach it to them??

Thanks!

#2 -*meh*-

Posted 24 January 2013 - 11:57 AM

QUOTE (mmuc83 @ 24/01/2013, 12:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hello!

I had a meeting with my CHN and she asked whether my DS2 who is 3 knew his name, where he lived and phone number?

I said he know his name, but not the rest.

She then asked about my DS1 who is 5.. i said he knows his age, half of our address and doesn't know phone number.....

she then said that i must teach them this asap esp my DS2......

so... at what age should they know this stuff?  Any recommendations on how to teach it to them??

Thanks!


neither of my boys know their address... but they have also moved twice in the last 12 mths so i don't really care.

We don't have a home phone and neither of them know my mobile number. they have never been in a situation to need it, if we are out somewhere big such as a show i write it on their arm/bag etc so if they get lost someone can call me.

But yes it is delayed to not know it apparently, DS1 was marked as delayed in that area on his ASD testing because he has no idea.

#3 i-candi

Posted 24 January 2013 - 11:59 AM

Not sure about when they should know but a goods way to teach them your home number is to give them your mobile and let them ring, hang up, ring, hang up ... It's fun for them but annoying for you.

I think teaching mobile numbers is more important so ring from home line to mobile again and again and again lol

#4 JustBeige

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:00 PM

I think mine were about 5 before they could remember it all.

DS still does the address backwards - suburbs first, then street address. It was easier to leave this then try and force him to remember it the 'correct' way.    It still gets the job done if he has to tell anyone the address.


How - we just used to make a game out of it when we were driving in the car, by doing the "If mummy was lost and a policeman asked what is your name; where do you live; what is mummys phone number...." and once they 'knew' it we would occasionally ask them to reinforce it.   But this was between 5 - 9.


I think the CHN is a bit off with the fairies if she thinks (generally) a child of 3 is going to remember this and remember it correctly each and every time.

#5 Cat People

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:02 PM

My 5 year recently learned his Grandma's phone number by dialling it once, which surprised me.  So I agree with pp, get them to use the phone.

I'd probably concentrate on that first, and then the address.   But I really wouldn't worry about it too much.  I think the nurse was being a bit OTT.

#6 babybeli

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:02 PM

My kids don't know our phone number but do know our full address and what number to call in an emergency ie 000 and to tell them why they are calling and where they are.

#7 mmuc83

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:03 PM

QUOTE (JustBeige @ 24/01/2013, 01:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I think the CHN is a bit off with the fairies if she thinks (generally) a child of 3 is going to remember this and remember it correctly each and every time.


That's what i thought.. but just thought i would check...

i'm glad that 5 seems to be a good age to start...

i-candi that would drive me insane - but i get the logic!

#8 MinkyMonkey

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:03 PM

DD knows name and address since just before she turned three. It wasn't really intentional she just asked where we live when I was pointing out countries on the globe. She got it by that afternoon and loves to tell everyone rolleyes.gif . She knows her grandparents addresss too.

Maybe you could start by telling them and writing it on the fridge and reenforcing it every time you return home eg. "We are home at xxx address"

ETA I agree with PP that phone numbers are probably more important, haven't even tried to teach DD that but I doubt she would remember a random 10 number sequence at three.

Edited by MinkyMonkey, 24 January 2013 - 12:07 PM.


#9 wannabe30

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:04 PM

My DS is two and is starting to learn his, but you have to ask the right questions. Ask where he lives and he'll tell you the street name and suburb, ask him what number is on his house and he'll tell you, but say "what's your address" and he has no clue.

Same with his name - you have to ask "who are you" not "what's your name".

And that's without mentioning the whole confidence issue of actually being willing to talk to a stranger (like the CHN) anyway.

However I'm confident that by the time he's five he'll be able to get it all right.

#10 BronR

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:08 PM

Part of DS's "homework" in year 1 was to learn his phone number. He already knew it, probably from the age of 4 1/2 or 5. He knows both my mobile and our home number. He knew our address from maybe 3 1/2?

DD starts school this year. She knows our address but not phone number. She is not so good at remembering things whereas DS remembers this type of stuff easily.


#11 Poss and Soss

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:11 PM

DS nearly 5 knows his full name our address and 3/4 of DH mobile number laugh.gif


#12 IsolaBella

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:19 PM

yes my kids all failed that MCHN part of that test. I also pointed out that I had never mentioned either to my kids before so no reason they should know it.

Around 5 they get our address.

My mobile i have not taught them  the number, but they all know to take off their shoe and ask someone to call their mummy if they are lost (Their shoes have their name and my number in it). Worked a bit too well. When DS1 at 6 forgot his lunch and the teacher said they would have to get my number from the office, DS1 whipped off his school shoe and provided the number that way.

DS2 at 3.5yrs was borderline on being mentally delayed on the MCHN test. He is actually very smart. His receptive language and understanding went from bottom 25% to top 90% in an 8m period when he finally started hearing properly.

Edited by lsolaBella, 24 January 2013 - 12:23 PM.


#13 Sif

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:22 PM

My four year old knows our house number and that is it. I honestly wouldn't expect him to know as it holds no particular interest for him and isn't something he talks about or is asked about.

That said, he can recite entire episodes of Doctor Who and Thomas the Tank Engine because those things interest him greatly.

Knowing your phone number and address is not as relevant in this day and age as it was back before mobile phones and the internet where information on a lost child can almost immediately be communicated to the police and or mass media.

#14 FeralBob!

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:25 PM

QUOTE (JustBeige @ 24/01/2013, 01:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I think the CHN is a bit off with the fairies if she thinks (generally) a child of 3 is going to remember this and remember it correctly each and every time.

Yes, me too. DD 5  does not know our phone number (mainly because, which of the three mobiles, two office numbers and a home number do I give?) But she does know our address, and where I work.

#15 FeralGiggelosaurus

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:28 PM

My DD knows our address, my full name and DHs full name.....no idea on phone numbers though.
( she has a great memory though....)

DD is 2.5

#16 mmuc83

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:30 PM

ok - feeling a little better now and not such a failure as we sometimes feel after these appointments!

#17 Sassy Dingo

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:30 PM

I have memories of being 'tested' on this by my year one teacher. We had to say our full names, date of birth, address and telephone number. So we were expected to know by 5 years old.

I still remember getting cranky as I could tell people my birthday was the last day of July, but not the actual date and not getting full marks for it original.gif



#18 JustMum08

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:31 PM

My DS is 5 in a month. He learnt my old address and to call 000 and who to ask for etc about mid last year. He has forgotten since we moved though so I may need to re teach him

#19 jobo77

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:32 PM

My DD (4 in April) wouldnt know. I have tried to teach her our address but I just asked her where we live and she said "at home" original.gif
On a side note, what is this MCHN test that has been mentioned? I dont see a health nurse just our GP - is that something that happens when she has her 4 year needle?

#20 Littleone84

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:32 PM

When i was in kindergarten, i remember our teacher calling up to her desk one at a time and having to recite our name, address and phone number.

Once we got it all correct she would give us a merit award. My mum still has it in my memory box at home.


#21 Carmen02

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:32 PM

wow by 3? my DS was barely talking by then!! We have moved a few times but my 10yr old knows the address (its a hard one to spell!! most adults dont know how to spell it lol) my 8yr old doesnt but he has alot of speech delays and all that. We dont have a home phone but DD is learning my mobile

#22 mmuc83

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:40 PM

QUOTE (jobo77 @ 24/01/2013, 01:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My DD (4 in April) wouldnt know. I have tried to teach her our address but I just asked her where we live and she said "at home" original.gif
On a side note, what is this MCHN test that has been mentioned? I dont see a health nurse just our GP - is that something that happens when she has her 4 year needle?


I went for a 3 year old check that we do here in WA - it is not compulsory - but she checked the following:

height
weight
whether he could recognise body parts
whether he could draw a face and put in all the appropriate parts e.g. eyes, ears, nose
hopping, one foot, both feet
jumping, one foot both feet
curvature of the spine
speech
sentence structure


#23 mollybot

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:47 PM

Quicker to get an RFID chip implanted, then you can just track the little buggers using GPS....

#24 jules77

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:49 PM

My 3 yr old actually knows our address and phone number and our nearest cross street. He also knows where the police station is.

We do lots of walking though and he showed interest in street names so I figured I may as well use this to my advantage and taught him our address.

We made up a catchy way to recite our phone number.

I do like the phone number in the shoe idea... Very clever!!

Edited by jules77, 24 January 2013 - 12:50 PM.


#25 schoolmum

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:49 PM

I just want to say well done and thank you for all of you teaching your children that information.
For those who's little ones are not quite there yet, please don't stress,  working at a primary school I have come across many a 5-7 year old who don't know what their last name is (no special needs, just no one has bothered to teach them).




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