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Landlord selling & open house
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#1 Top Of The World

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:31 PM

My real estate called me on Monday (sales consultant not my PM), informing me that my L/L is selling the property & that this Saturday there will be an open house.

As I am as a L/L, I called the PM of my IP & asked advice. He suggested I play along, but don't panic just yet.

I do have a lease, but that runs out next weekend & I haven't heard a peep from my PM. They haven't even done a 6 monthly inspection. Looking at the sale details that went up on their website less than 30mins after I got the call, the L/L just wants a sale & is not concerned if it's as a IP or a OO

I feel dirty at the thought of people coming through my house. Looking at my things & making an opinion of what they see. I have 2 young children, so if they expect showroom quality, they've got another thing coming.

How did you deal with opens as a seller or renter? Is there an advice that you've been given that made it easier on you.

This is my first rental experience & I can tell you, I hate it. Give me home owner status any day.

#2 CallMeFeral

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:33 PM

Translation of all the abbreviations?

#3 allthiseffortpaidoff

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:35 PM

As a LL with a rental on the market, we simply told the tenants what would be happening and offered them a break lease (which they accepted).

If not, we were prepared to pay for a cleaner to go through before the first home open and then expected the tenants to maintain the standard.

We had excellent tenants, so they had no problem with this.  I think it's all about dialogue.

#4 9ferals

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:37 PM

It's a pain, though we got lucky when our rental was sold - they only had one open house before it sold, and we were able to stay on.

My best suggestions
- make sure the house is clean but don't stress about it being perfect. If they are choosing to sell it while it's still occupied, they have accept that it will look lived in.  And most people aren't going to judge you on your furniture - and even if they do, you won't be there so you won't know anyway! Don't lose sleep worrying about this.
- ask for advance notification of the times they are planning for open inspections. If these don't fit with your schedule, I'm pretty sure you can request that they be changed (you'd need to check this with your tenants board in your state though.
- ensure you don't leave anything small and attractive (phones, jewellery, passports etc) anywhere visible while the house is open. Take them with you just so you feel more secure.

#5 Cath-In-SA

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:39 PM

QUOTE (CallMeAliG @ 23/01/2013, 01:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Translation of all the abbreviations?

PM = Property manager
LL = Landlord
IP = Investment Property
OO = Owner Occupier
NRS = Not Rocket Science

#6 sqawk

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:41 PM

Don't panic too much about the inspections.  You def can neg with agent about the timing and the number.  I also think they have to give you a certain amount of notice, maybe a week.  I haven't had inspections for sale but have had them prior to moving out when the agent was advertising for tennants.  I was quite firm that the inspections could not occur during nap time (1-3pm) and not after 5pm.  I may have relented on the 5pm criteria, so they could open one weekday evening, but luckily they only needed one open (which was a Saturday morning).

As for presentation: I think neat and tidy and reasonable clean is def enough.  If you are worried re possesions, take valuables, or hide them.  I do have a friend who had her husb take the kids away, but she stayed for the inspections as she was so worried  re theft etc.  Not something I would do, but an option if you are particularly worried.  I have also been to inspections for houses for sale, where the current tennant was sitting in the home-office working on the computer thoughout the inspection time.  So you don't have to leave the house if you dont want to, the agent cant make you leave.  Personally I wouldn't stay and def wouldn't stay with kids - just chaotic!!

Also you could sit in your car out the front.

#7 Oriental lily

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:41 PM

Take or lock up valuables and go out for the day.

Out of site out of mind.

Obviously if the house has not been inspected for  a while you will want the house and garden looking its best but everyday mess like random toys or the odd cup in the sink will not be a concern.

It's house being lived in.

#8 Kavity

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:43 PM

You don't have to have an open house, we had a rental sell we were in and refused, we allowed apointments only. I did not want people on mass in my house and insurance wouldn't cover anything which was stolen.

#9 asdf89

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:51 PM

Depends what state you're in but I know the ACT the tenant can refused open houses, and allow inspections by appointment instead. This would remove some of the stress of having masses of people wandering through your house.

If you're on a fixed lease they have to give a huge amount of notice of intention to sell (several months from memory) but much shorter if you're on month-to-month.

Read up on your states tenancy laws (normally there is a tenants organisation with guides/fact sheets) so you know how much notice they were meant to give, and what you can and can't refuse.

#10 WhatWouldBuffyDo?

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:58 PM

I also agree with keeping everything neat and tidy.  Not showroom.

Also remember that the buyer may be wanting to rent this out - it may be worth putting in a little extra effort.  If they see there are already good tenants in there they may be willing to keep you on.

#11 Bodacious Prime

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:58 PM

We've been through this twice. As PP said, neat and tidy is good enough, it doesn't have to be perfect. Lock up all your valuables and then I recommend you stay. I sat in the front lounge where I could be seen. I chatted with most people who came through which I think the agent appreciated but it also enabled me to keep an eye on things. My DH stayed at the back of the house where he could watch the kids room and shed. At the most recent one, there were 18 groups come through within the hour and it sold the next day.

#12 ECsMum

Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:05 PM

the only thing i would consider is if it ends up being an IP purchase the nicer you present and flexible you are the higher the chance they will offer you to stay on - be difficult and not present the place very well they might not want you as a tennant - well that's my rational about the inconvenience of open homes/selling....

#13 Pearson

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:27 PM

Has the sales consultant / pm given you written notice of the property going up for sale? Have. They given you entry notice as well??

This all has to be done if you are in Qld, lease or not.  Then they have to give you notice to vacate if not an IP.

#14 tle

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:39 PM

I agree with the pp who suggested putting in a bit of an effort. When we were looking lor our latest IP it was very obvious which houses were owner occupied and which were rentals. Some of the rentals clearly had tennants that were deliberately trying to make the place hard to sell (they couldn't possibly have lived in that state on a daily basis) and we only made offers based on vacant possession because I wouldn't have wanted them in any property I owned.

In contrast, there was one instance where the house was beautifuly kept by tenants that wanted to stay on and that was an added incentive for us to buy the place because it saved the trouble of finding suitable tenants.

#15 iheartu

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:48 PM

QUOTE (Cath-In-SA @ 23/01/2013, 02:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
PM = Property manager
LL = Landlord
IP = Investment Property
OO = Owner Occupier
NRS = Not Rocket Science


My bold - snarky and unnecessary she was just asking a question.

#16 katniss

Posted 23 January 2013 - 04:08 PM

QUOTE (Ruby Victoria @ 23/01/2013, 11:58 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I also agree with keeping everything neat and tidy.  Not showroom.

Also remember that the buyer may be wanting to rent this out - it may be worth putting in a little extra effort.  If they see there are already good tenants in there they may be willing to keep you on.



QUOTE (ECsMum @ 23/01/2013, 12:05 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
the only thing i would consider is if it ends up being an IP purchase the nicer you present and flexible you are the higher the chance they will offer you to stay on - be difficult and not present the place very well they might not want you as a tennant - well that's my rational about the inconvenience of open homes/selling....


I agree with both of these. We went through one house when we were looking for an IP and the current tenants were hanging around in their pjs and boxer shorts during the open house and the house was a total mess. Food and dishes left all over the kitchen, the rest of the house a total pig sty. It wasn't the house we were looking for but if we had bought it, we would not have been renewing their lease.


I agree with the PP who said an open dialogue between LL and tenant is important.

#17 mummabear

Posted 23 January 2013 - 05:11 PM

I am a LL and would happily throw out any tenants who didn't want to present my investment in a respectable manner. Legally of course.

It's the hazards and risks of renting. Sometimes people want to or need to sell.

Selling and inspections are painful that's for sure! Clean tidy uncluttered and lawns done is what I would expect. We are selling our own property at the moment and it is quite difficult with young kids, but can be done. I wouldn't do open houses if you are not comfortable.

#18 mummabear

Posted 23 January 2013 - 05:11 PM

I am a LL and would happily throw out any tenants who didn't want to present my investment in a respectable manner. Legally of course.

It's the hazards and risks of renting. Sometimes people want to or need to sell.

Selling and inspections are painful that's for sure! Clean tidy uncluttered and lawns done is what I would expect. We are selling our own property at the moment and it is quite difficult with young kids, but can be done. I wouldn't do open houses if you are not comfortable.

#19 ~~~

Posted 23 January 2013 - 05:30 PM

This has happened to us twice and both times we stayed during inspections. You do have some rights as a tenant in NSW as to how often they can show the property etc. We kept our place clean, put valuables somewhere safe and out of the way and made sure the kids were entertained. That was about it.

#20 mumtoactivetoddler

Posted 23 January 2013 - 05:41 PM

Do not leave the house for open houses as you are not insured for anything. if the real estate wants you out then insisit they sign a letter that they will cover any damage or theft, otherwise do not go out. (The RE won't be happy about it but tough).

Keep it nice but not showroom, you are still living there.

#21 Sharlie2878

Posted 23 January 2013 - 05:54 PM

I once had an extremely painful experience while renting when the owner decided to sell.  For some reason the owner decided to use a different REA for the sale and it pretty much went south from there.  I had no written notice of anything, just a random phone call from an unknown REA saying they wanted to do an open.  

After I called and clarified the situation with the PM I contacted the selling REA and basically said I was fine with showing people through but no open house inspections (the PM had already told me I didn't have to).  I also said I was happy to have minimal notice as long as they didn't bring more than 2-3 people through as I had 2 large dogs who scared the bejesus out of most people who didn't know them.  If they wanted to bring anymore than that through I would need at least 2 days notice to make sure I could take the dogs out so people would be comfortable (and I could not stress about people leaving gates open).  I thought I was being pretty reasonable, but apparently not.

They rang me one day and asked if they could bring a couple through the next afternoon at 4.30, I said should be ok but I will have to call you back and confirm as I didn't finish work till 5 need to check with boss.  Called her back 5 minutes later and she asks if a second couple can come through, probably just the one of them, I said sure as long as that is it as I wont have time to do anything with the dogs.

I get home the next day at 4.15, there are 3 cars already parked outside my house, none of them belonging to the REA.  I go inside get changed and come back out, there are now 15 people standing outside my gate, plus some kids and a baby, but still no REA.  At 4.45 people start asking if they can just come in, I say I really want to wait for the REA, who finally turns up 10 minutes later.  I ask this guy I have never met to come in for a moment, when I ask who all these people are and what happened to the 2 couples I was told about, he stares at me and says are you saying my staff lie?  A little confused I say, I asked to be give notice if more than 3 people are coming so I can take the dogs out, he says 'It's not your house what do you care?'

At this point I give up and when asked by the prospective buyers about the place I pointed out the dying mango tree, leaking spa, and hole in the ceiling from the leaking solar hot water system.  I rang the PM the next day as well as legal aid to check my rights, which given the situation I though might be a good idea.  Once I told the PM what happened the house was taken off the market, and I informed her in the same call I would not be renewing the lease.   Based on that experience and the advice given to me I will say ask for all communication to be in writing as well as phone (ie when they call ask for a confirmation email), and hope that the REA they have chosen to sell the house has some manners!

#22 roses99

Posted 23 January 2013 - 06:02 PM

It's frustrating, but I think you should do what you would want your own tenants to do if the situation were reversed. Which I think would be, be as accommodating as is reasonable and keep the house as neat and tidy as you can.

Had you had any discussions about extending the lease? Given that it's up next Saturday, were you intending to stay on?

Edited by roses99, 23 January 2013 - 06:06 PM.


#23 Coffeegirl

Posted 23 January 2013 - 06:24 PM

QUOTE (Top Of The World @ 23/01/2013, 02:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
As I am as a L/L, I called the PM of my IP & asked advice. He suggested I play along, but don't panic just ye

I feel dirty at the thought of people coming through my house. Looking at my things & making an opinion of what they see. I have 2 young children, so if they expect showroom quality, they've got another thing coming.

How did you deal with opens as a seller or renter? Is there an advice that you've been given that made it easier on you.

This is my first rental experience & I can tell you, I hate it. Give me home owner status any day.


I woud look at it this way.  How would you like your own tenants to present your own IP and how often would you expect them to allow people through if you had to sell?

Then transfer your expectation based on the above to that of your LL. So if you'd expect your tenant to have your property show room standard, then you should do the same for your LL.

#24 kim27

Posted 23 January 2013 - 06:24 PM

make sure you get something in writing about what happens with your lease when it expires. I was caught out when my LL was selling the place I rented. The agent assured me that I could stay there as long as I needed on a periodic agreement after the lease expired as the owner was selling it as an investment property. Then when the lease expired I got a phone while away for work asking me if I'd vacated the property yet as the owner now wanted to 'do up' the place to  sell! After much stress and arguments as to whether there was a verbal agreement of a periodic lease I managed to get a few weeks to found somewhere new. Lesson learnt.

#25 Holidayromp

Posted 23 January 2013 - 07:06 PM

Firstly tell them where they can go jump.
Secondly get advice on your rights.
Thirdly they need to give you notice in writing to state that the house is going on the market
Fourthly you do not need to clean or tidy - it is your home you choose how you want to live.
Fifthly You can decline open homes and you can set certain times in which you will allow inspections.

Most importantly while is it your LL house it is your HOME.  You are paying $$$ to live there and have peaceful enjoyment of the property.  I would not renew the lease - go and start looking - you have time up your sleeve as they have not adhered to the notice period.  Renting a house for sale is the pits considering you do all the work to help sell it and you end up loosing a roof over your head.

Also consider that most RE will say anything to you to get you to agree to more and more and more but the reality is that they don't give a sh*t about you and they will play the line that they are pitching it to an investment market....yeah right meanwhile you put up with crap all for nothing.

Do not let them walk all over you.  Know your rights because RE hates tenants that do.




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