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whats is your 3 yr old routine like


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#1 cheekymonkeysmum

Posted 22 January 2013 - 06:30 PM

Hi

Just a general wonderment of what your 3 yr olds routine is like atm I feel like we are stuck in a rut same thing everyday sort of thing.

Eg my son will wake up from anywhere from 6am-10:30am we have breakfast clean up either go down the shops do some cleaning or go to mothers group.
Then ds has lunch around 11:30/12.
Then in the afternoon we either play outside/go to the park or with his toys inside (depending on the weather we have a very high humidity in summer or it just decides to rain a lot) so most days it hard to get outside and well I feel like we are getting sick of seeing the same four walls every day and even though we are a short drive from town money doesn't always permit a lot of outings.

By 3pm I feel like we have hit a dead end ds is always whinging because he is bored and by this time I feel like cutting my ears off because it's the 100th time he has high pitched screamed at me (he has server language delay).
ds also doesn't nap anymore he gave them up at 16 months and hasn't had one since and is a terrible night sleeper still waking up at 2-4am and not going I sleep till late even when we put him to bed at the same time every night then bouncing off the walls the minutes he wakes to the minutes he finally closed his eyes at night.

I just feel at a loss and extremely overtired.


So please share your 3 yr old routines  :-).

TIA.


#2 luke's mummu

Posted 22 January 2013 - 06:41 PM

The night waking 2-4am is not normal for a 3 year old IMO. Does he snore at all? Doe he sleep with his neck extended back? Just wondering if he could have enlarged adenoids or tonsils causing him to wake up?

#3 cheekymonkeysmum

Posted 22 January 2013 - 06:48 PM

No he doesn't snore he always falls to sleep on his tummy and flat he rarely uses his pillow either.

#4 agnodice

Posted 22 January 2013 - 06:52 PM

Dropping a nap at 16 months is not normal, nor is the night waking. Not is sleeping in until 10:30 am.

I think you need some help addressing some pretty significant sleep issues. If he is chronically sleep deprived, it can't be helping!

With my now 3.5 year old, for the last six months, we have had a morning activity (so we are out of the house by 10 am at the absolute latest) - story time at the local library, classes, play dates, a trip to the park, whatever. Lunch is about midday, sometimes we're home for it, sometimes still out. Even at 3.5 he still has a couple naps a week, and if not, then a quiet time with some books in the middle of the day. Then a playground trip and to shops in the afternoon, and he'll play by himself for an hour while I make tea. Dinner at 5:30, bath at 6:15, 1-2 TV shows (10 min ones) with a glass o milk while we clean up after dinner, 3-5 books and bed at 7:30. He will wake about 7 am, breakfast, dressed, and out again.

We would rarely spend a whole day at home - even in the rain there are puddles to jump in!

#5 raven74

Posted 22 January 2013 - 07:04 PM

It's draining having a bad sleeper isn't it?  I think you are both probably perpetually exhausted.
You need a definite time of waking and bed time for starters and be strict with it.
I'd start by not letting him sleep till 10.30am, this will be impacting his night sleep.  I'd be getting him up at 7.30 at the latest.
Does he still have a night bottle?  Does he want a bottle/drink at his night waking?  The only reason I ask is that getting rid of the bottle (D is 2.9 years) was our saving grace, she began sleeping through).
It sounds like he has no lack of stimulation, he is just exhausted by the afternoon - even if he won't sleep can you start "quiet time" in his bed (reading a book that kind of thing) for a period of time then extend it?  At least he is getting a rest.
If he's really bouncing off the walls it may also help to look at his diet and see if there may be anything there that might be affecting him (colours, preservatives, gluten, dairy, etc).
You have my empathy, until recently I was still getting up to mine twice a night.  It is hell.

#6 Mrs Manager

Posted 22 January 2013 - 07:05 PM

I work 3 days and the kids are at daycare, so I will just share then non-daycare, non-weekend routine

6am - DS 18 mnths wakes
6.45ish - DD 3yo wakes
6.50 - milk & tv
7.30 Breakfast
8.30 - leave for the gym (with Creche)
10.00 supermarket shopping
11.00 - DS falls asleep in the car on the way home, DD will sometimes
12.00 DD lunch, then quiet time if she is not having a sleep
1.30- DS up so afternoon activity, usually at home, helping with housework or water play etc.  I find they both need to get into the garden at this point if we are not going out to the beach etc
5.00pm Dinner the bath straight after
6.00pm Quiet wind down
7.00pm Bed for DS and DD as well if she has had no day sleep.  If she had a day sleep she will stay up till 8pm

#7 cheekymonkeysmum

Posted 22 January 2013 - 07:27 PM

Thanks you for the advice and posting your routines.

I think a lot of the reasons ds has so much energy is because of his medication that unfortunately he needs to be on (hydrocortisone 4mg in the morning 2mg in the afternoon and 2mg just before bed plus thyroxine and growth hormone thyroxine is given to him at night so is growth hormone.)

We are waiting to see if ds can take some medication that will help him sleep (I forgot the name of it atm though it starts with a M) because we are unsure if he takes something to help him sleep the hydrocortisone might not work and if the hydrocortisone doesn't work ds will have an adrenal crisis and we don't want that every morning.

We have looked into Ds's diet (he hasn't had bloods done yet) but we noticed he was more hyper with red foods and dye so we don't give him that anymore.

When we see ds's Pead next month we will be mentioning how his sleep is so hopefully he can help.

Also he does sometimes have a warm milk/water to go to bed with not all the time but sometimes and he isn't tted yet so yes the amount of fluids he has is like double the amount he pee's so when he wakes in the middle of the night it's mostly for a nappy change we rarely give him another milk/water but if he wants a drink we do give it to him as he needs to keep his fluids up (he drinks between 600-1200mls a day) and yeah wets his nappy double that.

Ds also has a social phobia and lots of noises scare him (spd) and among that he is getting tested for ASD.

So yes a very crazy house here with a very energetic LB.

Edited by cheekymonkeysmum, 22 January 2013 - 09:52 PM.


#8 Pup-pup

Posted 22 January 2013 - 08:35 PM

I can give you an idea of what my DD's routine is like:

7:00am Awake.  Watch tv
7:30-8. Breakfast.
8:30am.  Continue playing whilst I do a couple of chores
10am.  Either go out for a playdate,  swimming,  craft activity at home.
10:30am. Morning tea & outside play if at home.
11:30.  Inside play whilst I prepare lunch
12:00.  Lunch
12:45-1pm.  Get ready for bed.  I pack away most toys
1-3pm.  Sleep or rest time. We are always home for rest time.
3pm.  Go for walk (my daughter still goes in the pram most of the way),  but you could do walk, scooter, bike.
4pm.  Home.  Put on a DVD.
5:30pm.  Dinner
6:00pm Bath
6:30.  Quiet play.
7:00.  Books in bed
7:30. Sleep.

I would be waking him up no later than 7:30am as a start,  and having a 'rest' time everyday.


#9 agnodice

Posted 22 January 2013 - 09:32 PM

I think with that extra info, I'd like to apologise for suggesting his sleep 'wasn't normal' - sounds like there are a lot of things going on, and perhaps my advice is largely irrelevant!

Hopefully your paed can give you some tips.

#10 liveworkplay

Posted 22 January 2013 - 09:44 PM

I can't really help as my 3 year old goes to daycare 4 days a week. But she wakes at 530am most mornings and then gets into our bed and has a warm milk and falls asleep. I wake her at 645am and give her breakfast and we are out the door by 715am. On our non daycare day, same except she can sleep until 730 if she wants and then we get dressed and take the girls to school. We come home, have breakfast, watch a bit of telly while I shower/clean and then go to swim lesson. Depending how tired she is, come home or go to the shops/chores. Lunch and bumming around home until pick up time for school. Then we come home, snack and she plays with her sisters most of the time. Bed is 730pm.

She has just stopped night nappies so usually wakes once for the toilet (or because she has wet the bed) Sometimes she will have a nap, but not usually.

#11 pinkcupcakes

Posted 22 January 2013 - 09:58 PM

with my 3.5 dd i do a lot of activities. i usually aim at spending $10 or less a week on something crafty, or sometimes something special like geleez.

also at this age dd is doing letter tracing, i bought her a notebook and i mark out the dot with a felt tip and then she traces over them. i've also been getting her to do numbers and shapes as well. maybe that could help with the language delay also?just a thought.

plus i've downloaded heaps of preschool apps onto my phone,  theres so many good puzzle ones, and bubble popping, teaching letters, numbers, sounds, colours, days and months etc. and a lot of them are free.
i also like going to the library for storytime, often they have craft afterwards too and its all free.awesome biggrin.gif

dd still has a sleep everyday, from 12:30 til about 2 (give or take half an hour.)

i hope that helps, gives you some ideas, etc. happy.gif

Edited by pinkcupcakes, 22 January 2013 - 10:04 PM.


#12 Dionysus

Posted 22 January 2013 - 10:01 PM

I work, so DD goes to child care 3 days per week, so they have their own thing happening there.

On the days she is with me or my mum, we follow similar routines..

She is 3.5 years old and just (this past week) given up her day nap (was sleeping 2 hours in the afternoon when not at child care)

Wake 7:00 ish
play till 8:00
Breakfast (she doesn't like eating straight after waking up in the morning)
Get ready
9:00 - mostly head out (shops, or play date, or pool, or whatever)
10:30 morning tea, play
12:30 lunch
1:30 - 2:30 rest time (still figuring this out, must lie on couch with pillow/blanket, no talking but TV is on (I often fall asleep!))
3:00 -  afternoon tea
3:30 - park, outside play, gardening, walk the dog...
5:00 - help with dinner, play with DH/dog
5:30 - dinner
6:15- bath, stories, quiet play
7:00 - bed

I guess the meds might be throwing it all out, but I agree with a pp - I would be waking your DS by 8:00 latest, and trying to figure out a rest time in the afternoon if you can.  The sleep thing seems to be all out of whack and is perhaps the main issue.  Though, as I said, the meds might make this difficult to manage - I have no idea, but I hope you can figure something out that 'works' for you guys






#13 jules83

Posted 22 January 2013 - 10:03 PM

My son turns 3 in March our routine has been thrown out of whack a little with hubby home thru Jan and me being in extreme pain from an infected tooth over the past 2 weeks but usually is as follows
6.30-7am Awake ..watch some TV7.45 Breakfast then i get my 6 month old fed/changed/dressed etc8.00  play time with trains, cars or outside trampoline 9.00  out the door to shops/park/play date 12.30 lunchtime 1.30  some tv or playing with his fave iPad apps3.00. dad comes home they catch up and wrestle with each other. must be a boy thing!5.30 dinner 6.30 bath & story 7.30 Bed
My son dropped his daysleep before he turned two it was exhausting especially being pregnant but I refused to spend the whole day trying to get him to sleep, he jut went to bed early and slept thru the night.. I was happy with that


#14 *~dee~*

Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:10 PM

My just 3yo DD is a crap sleeper too. I am overtired all the time! I have been working full time, but just changed to part time to spend more time with her, but this is our routine when I'm home:

4:30-5:30 - She wakes, breakfast pretty much straight away.
6:00-8:00 - Watches Dora and a bit of play, get dressed, clean teeth etc.
8:00-12:00 - Usually go out to the park, beach, playdates, shopping centre etc, morning tea is around 9am.
12:00 - Lunch
12:30-2:30 - Nap time (sometimes has a smaller sleep in the car if we are out and about)
3:00 - Usually hang around home, play outside with dogs, ride bike out the front, helps me with chores, plays with barbies, dolly and colouring in.
5:30 - Dinner then bath
6:30 - Pack up time, I help her tidy her room and pick up all toys spotless for the next day
7:00-7:30 - Bedtime

I have a big problem with her sleeping! She can sometimes still be awake at 9:30, nearly always rises by 5am. She wakes during the night having a tantrum, sometimes twice, nothing I do seems to calm her down. She's crying for Nanny, so only Nanny can calm her (we live with Nanny!). She often needs to do a wee so I have to get her on the toilet kicking and screaming otherwise she'll wet the bed or the floor beside the bed. I am beside myself with it as it's becoming more often. I just don't know what to do. The crying can go on for an hour or more, and sometimes twice in one night.



#15 Natttmumm

Posted 24 January 2013 - 11:42 AM

DD2 is 3. I Also have DD1 age 5 so they do occupy each other.

7am up for the day. She's usually awake a bit earlierBreakfast and tv
We usually head out around 9 am. We do swimming, play group,park, friends house, library, shops.
Home by 1130 lunch
1230 sleep for 1.5hours. She can't stay awake Much more.
2pm watch tv
3pm play outsdide - agree this is bored time. She helps me make dinner etc
5 pm dinner bath stories7bed.
Its hard to fill the day and she's does get bored she also goes to fdc once a week.



#16 Natttmumm

Posted 24 January 2013 - 11:43 AM

Wanted to add she was sleeping very poorly until we took out tonsils. Now she's fine. She did snore a lot.

#17 purpledelight

Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:36 PM

I love reading what everyone else's routine's are, as we can never achieve them! The only reaction you can give is to laugh or cry! We have resigned to the fact that our little one (3 years in March) has different needs to EVERYONE we know. She was on medication for silent-reflux, still has food issues with acid, she has grommets for glue ear and is getting a second set in two weeks and has had intensive speech therapy as she didn't talk until 19 months (you can't keep her quiet now!) We failed sleep school and we went away knowing that our child was our little creation, who didn't need to sleep as much as other children.

Whilst we have boundaries and regular tantrums, we respect her as much as safety and sanity allows! She is a bright little button, who knows what she wants and needs.  She didn't sleep through until she was about 2 and a half and still wakes up regularly if she has had a stressful, eventful day (like falling off the trampoline or going to the local pools or seeing her cousins.)

Our routine (as much as we have one)

7.30-8.30 Wake (if not awake, we let the dog onto her room...she loves the dog so much, she gets up!)

Play for a bit

8.00-9.00 ish Breakfast depending on what time she wakes

8.30-9.30 ish Out for the morning, or playing with whatever I've set up for the week/day We change what she plays with regularly because she gets bored so easily. Lately we've gone for masking tape and tissue paper, wooden blocks, frozen objects in ice cubes (you watch them melt) Mini-trampoline, tunnels, cubby houses, lining up every spoon in the house!?!

10.30-11.30 Fruit Snack We leave it on a low shelf in the fridge with a water bottle, she gets it herself or gets a reminder about 11.

More Playing...often With Mum. Help with vacuuming, or dishes, or chopping vegetables for dinner (put them in ice water in the fridge and then they'll last until dinner!) Hide and Seek... she hides and you get to put stuff away as you look for her!

12.30-1.30 (sometimes as late as 2) Lunch I read her a story or get a book on CD so that she stays still and stops talking long enough to eat. If DH is on watch, she gets to watch a DVD on the computer with him.

More Playing (get upset that the red crayon isn't as red as you wanted it to be)

3.30-4.30 Afternoon Snack (Enquire why cheese is yellow and does it come in any other colours)

More Playing (Beg, beg, beg to play on the iPad, get the iPad, play for only 1 minute and then wake up the dogs by shouting, WAKE UP, three cm from their faces.)

6.00-6.30 Dad Gets home, Mum puts on dinner or Dad puts on dinner with DD, while Mum gets a cup of tea.

7.00 Dinner

7.30 Run around in the backyard with the dogs. Go to the local park and have a tantrum that there are no kids there (If there are kids there, have a tantrum that another child is on the swing/slide and you want a turn)

8.30-9.00 Bath Time.. Negotiable... otherwise a wipe over with a cloth.

9.00 Stories on the couch (one if we think she is tired, several if she is wriggly and fidgety)

Story/stories in bed until she rolls over and says, "no more stories, I'm going to sleep"

10pm It is a good night if she is asleep. Sometimes it can be 11pm or heaven-help us, Midnight this happened alot over the Christmas sugar-filled festive season.

2am, 4am, Cry out in sleep (Sleep Talker) about imaginary lost robots, fairies taking your socks, going to Kindergarten (4 hours a week!) or visiting Grandma.

Not sure any of this helps, it never helped me to read anyone else's routine, just to worry if I was doing it right. If you are not coping try to carve a little space for yourself (My little one went to Childcare one day a week for a year so I could have a sleep day!) Find solace in the fact that your little person is amazing and recite the mantra, 'This too will pass.'

Let us all know how you get on.




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