Jump to content

Dingoes


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#1 CallMeFeral

Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:30 PM

Does anyone know much about these?
A cousin of mine has gotten right into them and keeps sending me links to ones looking for a home. Apparently their temperament is lovely yada yada yada - but of course this is from a Dingo preservation website so I've no idea whether this is actually true.

Thought I'd ask advice from an alternate source! Not really sure if we're ready for a dog, but I do toy with the idea occasionally.

#2 ChexMix

Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:38 PM

Get an alcatraz-style containment system. They have wrists! ohmy.gif
And don't expect a reliable recall, ever.
Personally, I think the dogs we have spent 20,000 years breeding to enjoy our company are just awesome. I can understand rescuing an abandoned pup, but in general they don't need us or even particularly like us, so wouldn't be my 1st, 2nd or 50th choice for a pet.

#3 *LucyE*

Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:39 PM

Ummm, don't know much about them other than its illegal to keep one as a domestic pet in Qld.

Personally, if you don't know if you're ready for a dog, don't even look at an animal that is still quite wild. Domestic dogs have been domesticated over many, many, many generations with ethical breeding aiming to breed sound temperaments into family dogs.

I'd keep looking.

#4 opethmum

Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:40 PM

Look at your state regulation in keep dingoes, they are a protected species and you may have to have a special license to keep these.

#5 CountryFeral

Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:44 PM

Well they are illegal to keep as a domestic pet in this state too.

My sister had a very dingo-y looking dog once, strangers would approach you if you were walking him and go right off assuming he was a dingo and lecturing you about how dangerous that was!

They are NOT good pets.  They are a wild dog.  If you wouldn't want a jackal or a wolf as a pet then you wouldn't want a dingo either.

#6 JRA

Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:45 PM

Add to that the fact that the likelihood of a pure bred dingo is lower and lower nowadays.

#7 CallMeFeral

Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:46 PM

Seems to be legal here, as the guy currently rehoming his dog lives a couple of hours from me.

He did say though that it IS an amazing escape artist (wrists????), so I think that rules us out as we are on a main road... sad.gif

#8 asdf89

Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:48 PM

My understanding is the only purebred dingoes left in Australia are on Fraser Island... the mainland ones are mixed with wild dogs (so the temperament/colouring/size would be different to that of a dingo).

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/jou...rom-hybrids.htm

Where can you even get a dingo pup from?

#9 ChexMix

Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:52 PM

Yep, wrists, and cunning smarts up the wazoo - http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/jou...of-tool-use.htm
Australian Cattle Dogs have some dingo in them but are easy to train and will love you to pieces original.gif Kelpies are very similar-looking too if you like that body-type, you can even get yellow kelpies, but again with a great temperament original.gif

#10 ChexMix

Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:54 PM

QUOTE (asdf89 @ 22/01/2013, 10:48 AM)
15259879[/url]']
My understanding is the only purebred dingoes left in Australia are on Fraser Island... the mainland ones are mixed with wild dogs (so the temperament/colouring/size would be different to that of a dingo).

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/jou...rom-hybrids.htm

Where can you even get a dingo pup from?


Not according to the latest research http://www.feral.org.au/dingo-purity-in-australia/

#11 la di dah

Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:56 PM

Don't know crap about dingos but I researched wolf-hybrids at one time. Someone will be along to tell me if I am way off base but what I found with wolf-hybrids is...they are... unfortunately ill-suited to most of the people who want them.

They are spooky - I don't mean they are scary looking, I mean they spook and bolt. Wild dogs are NOT brave, domestic dogs are brave because they're a bit silly/sheltered, wild dogs survive by running awayyyy from danger unless they have a lot of buddies with them. Wolf-hybrids fear bite. They startle quite easily and are not good at recall or even staying with their people by their own inclination. They need a lot of exercise and can run quite far quite steadily, especially if they are upset.

Quite challenging in a family setting, particularly in small residential lots, and not easy-going with children or other pets.

I like big dogs... I grew up with Akitas, which are strong and pig-headed, and I felt bad for the wolf-hybrids popping up in rescue... but I realized that I personally am probably better suited to a dopier, more trusting, domestic dog. That doesn't necessarily mean dainty toy breeds, just even the bad-rap breeds are more used to being in a family setting. I really like Rotties, for example. (...okay, Rotties are also just a good lazy person dog but shhh...)

#12 Mama8

Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:04 PM

I wouldn't recommend them as a pet.
They are great escape artists rivalling Houdini himself and the enclosures they need to be kept in can be costly.
Training is difficult.
While I'm against BSL I do think that they aren't a good choice for a family with small children was they are a wild animal and that's not a risk I'd be willing to take.
Yu could never own a small pet such as bunnies as they would be lunch in no time.
They are strong willed and smart and would be dominant over a not so strong person in no time ( hence the kid thing)
And as someone stated already the chance of it being a pure dingo is fairly low a d some crosses can produce a dodgy mix.
Having worked with dingoes in the passed I'm not an expert but I did get to observe their behaviours that i listed and as much as I love them I know they don't make good pets.
There are breeds that have similar looks and better personalities which you could look at including Shiba inus etc
I hope this makes sense ?


#13 runnybabbit

Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:06 PM

I worked in the NT for a time and encountered quite a few dingoes (pure or not, who knows) kept as pets. I wouldn't recommend it. One pet dingo bit a locum vet quite badly when she tried to muzzle it. IME they can be a great pet for their owner, but they're not good with other people.  As PP said they're a wild animal. Don't mistake a tame wild animal for a domesticated one.

#14 MrsLexiK

Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:09 PM

hell no.  

If I was older (and thus my child a teenager) and I lived on a sort of farm thing, I may and I said may have looked at rescuing one.  There was a property a few years ago which went broke or the guy died or something and he left his dog.  From memory (and I could be wrong) they were half breds and full bred dingos or resuced dingos or something.  They were assured to be safe and meet all the tests to go to live with humans (as long as you had a permit) I *think* another Dingo sancutary (who breed and sell dingos to normal people and are still in operation in Victoria) ended up taking on these dingos (this property had all sorts of exotic animals and from memory it was legal so I think it was an education centre where the owners had died - but I am not 100% sure)  ETA: I would have looked into rescuing the dingo because I can't stand the thought of an animal being put to sleep through no fault of their own.  These dingos where domesticated so could not be put back in the wild, if they could not find a home they would have been PTS.  (This is why we are not going to get land because we will become a dumping ground!)

Would I have a dingo with young kids, in surbia when I hadn't owned large breed dogs and was not comfortable approaching all dogs - then never.

Edited by MrsLexiK, 22 January 2013 - 01:12 PM.


#15 FeralDancesHere

Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:10 PM

We have a wildlife sanctuary behind our house that breeds dingoes so we see them getting walked sometimes.

They don't go to the dog parks and they also undergo heavy socialisation with people yet can still be jumpy creatures.

I don't think they'd be a suitable pet for most people.

#16 asdf89

Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:11 PM

QUOTE (kiddies-n-kelpies @ 22/01/2013, 01:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Not according to the latest research http://www.feral.org.au/dingo-purity-in-australia/



Well that's more postive! I thought it was a bit depressing that we humans and our naughty dogs had messed up the dingoes.
And it follows that the further the dingoes get from human settlements, the more pure they would be.

Another thought, do dingoes requrie a lot of exercise? (I'm assuming they would) so being confined to a yard might make them bored and bring out the more negative aspects to their personality.

#17 joy6328

Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:38 PM

Friends of ours had 3 when we were growing up - I think they were full dingo or only one generation mixed - they were incredibly loyal and fiercly protective of the family. We were terrified of them.

#18 CallMeFeral

Posted 22 January 2013 - 03:04 PM

Ha - ok yep, sounds like a terrible idea. Thanks folks!

#19 **MrsPotatoHead**

Posted 25 January 2013 - 10:44 PM

Bad idea Op sorry sad.gif  Neighbor down the road has one as she is a Trainee Vet and that thing NEVER stays in it's yard and they have 8ft fencing!!!  Won't let you near it to catch it most times, apparently jumps on the bench all the time for food and is shocking to train.  Why would you bother when you could get a domesticated dog that needs far less work? original.gif

My parents also have a next door neighbor with a Dingo Cross and she is a lovely natured dog but forever getting out as well and it's driving my dad NUTS trying to escape proof their side of the fence (owners are lazy and can't be bothered).  My parents used to let her inside with their dog when it got out to keep it safe until owners got home.  However, she would steal food from plates, tables, benches, etc and just knock everything down.  Again though, she seems to have a lovely nature but not for suburbia sad.gif

#20 meljbau

Posted 25 January 2013 - 11:04 PM

My friends have 2 dingoes, a male and a female. One from the sanctuary mentioned by a PP and the other from a dingo rescue organisation. They had another female prior to these 2 but she died young from liver disease. Their dingoes are bonded to the family but very wary of outsiders, even people they "know" quite well. They are inside every night with the family but spend the day outside when everyone is at work/school.
My friends had to get permits and meet certain requirements regarding super high fences etc. They also have a large run for them. Although their previous dog escaped once when the neighbour demolished a fence without warning them, I don't believe these 2 ever have.

#21 lafonda

Posted 25 January 2013 - 11:10 PM

I had a dingo kelpie cross for a decade. He was a great family dog.

#22 unicorn

Posted 26 January 2013 - 08:50 AM

I had a dingo x, I got her when she was old enough to fit in my coat pocket, she was tiny. She was 16 when she died. She was a great family pet, loved the kids, knew when to get her hackles up at strangers and when to greet them with a wag of her tail. Even tolerated friends ratbag kids, so easy to train. No problem keeping her around chickens or the kids pet rabbits.
Her "bark" was funny, dingoes don't bark so she kind of had this choked bark sound.

#23 Lil Chickens

Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:08 AM

They are highly protective.  I knew someone with a dingo cross.  She had it since it was a pup and when she met her partner and they had a baby the dingo accepted them as family and protected them as such.  We were all at their place one night and as it got on dusk and the blokes were throwing a ball about someone came out of the half dark under a tree to get the ball and Ras (the dingo) went him.  Grazed him through his t-shirt.  Why?  Because sitting on the ground just near said tree was the baby and the dog was protecting it.  Beautiful dog otherwise and very friendly in normal circumstances but I couldn't relax if I owned him in case something like the above situation happened with a worse outcome.  She could walk to the corner shop and leave baby outside int he pram with Ras attached, no-one came near!


My mum worked with someone who had three.  He had a house on 20 or 30 acres and had VERY high fencing around the property.  The dogs came in and out of the house as they pleased (they were his life) but they also made a mess of the yard with holes and burrows.



#24 bonnybabe

Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:16 AM

we had friends with them, and had a puppy once (it was unfortunately killed by an aggressive dog).  They had quite  a few, and I always felt uneasy walking any where if my parents weren't with me - I would have been about 15 at the time.  I have also felt that way about my uncles dog which was a rottweiler that would growl at me when I was alone, but not with bigger people.  

I think they have their place as rescue animals, but you would NEVER EVER leave them unattended with children or visitors (I know you aren't supposed to with any dog, but we all do at some point).

They are super smart, and can even 'walk' backwards to try to fool people.  Perhaps have a look for it on you tube.

And don't even think about any other pets, birds, chooks, rabbits etc. they will be breakfast.

#25 *Ker*

Posted 26 January 2013 - 03:17 PM

I'm experienced with different breeds and even I would not take a dingo! I'm not scared of them, but I don't see them as having a place in suburbia.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

Share the little things that make you smile

We're giving away a Mountain Buggy nano, the ultimate travel stroller - and here are some of the great entries so far.

Toddler pleads for return of "stolen" nose

A two-year-old's reaction to a game of "got your nose" shows it doesn't take much to make a toddler cry.

The 15 photos new parents share (and five they don't)

From the first scan photo to the baby covered in cake at their first birthday party, there are 15 photos most parents seem to share - and some they don't.

Doctor sings first Happy Birthday to newborns

His job is to deliver babies, but this US obstetrician also has a unique way of celebrating the miracle of life.

Breastfeeding friendly café goes viral

A photo of a breastfeeding-friendly sign in a cafe has been posted to Facebook and shared by hundreds of mums around the world.

First look at the Bugaboo Bee3

The newest Bugaboo Bee ? the Bee3 ? offers a variety of improved features, including a much asked-for bassinet and a rainbow of colour combinations.

Childcare costs, not paid leave, the real issue for parents

Given the choice between maintaining their wage for six months to have a child, or having a reduced rate of pay for a time but a better deal on childcare when returning to work, there are no odds on what most working parents would choose.

Win a Mountain Buggy nano

We?re giving away the new Mountain Buggy Nano - the lightweight travel buggy! So show us the little things that make you smile for your chance to win.

We lost three babies in two years

Our first pregnancy ended the way we all expected it to - with a healthy, happy baby in our arms. What a true blessing he was, for we were not to know the heartache we were about endure.

Family turned back from doomed flight MH17

'There must have been someone watching over us and saying, 'You must not get on that flight,' says mother who narrowly avoided boarding the Malaysian Airlines flight which exploded in mid-air over the Ukraine last night.

The myths and facts about "normal" breastfeeding

When it comes to successful breastfeeding, there is a wide variety to what is "normal", according to new research.

Adorable Skeanie loafers for kids

Your little toddler or preschooler can now get their nautical on with a new range of classic loafers by Australian show brand Skeanie.

My baby is hypermobile

For months, I have been telling myself not to worry that Jasmin isn't crawling or walking. This week I heard the term hypermobile for the first time.

When you don?t bond with your baby

They say that there is no bond greater than the bond between a mother and her child. But for some women, the mother-baby bond takes more time and effort to develop.

Yumi Stynes: Having a baby after a 10-year break

After a long break, Yumi Stynes gets a reminder of the pain - and the pleasure - of giving birth.

Grieving father asks for help to Photoshop his daughter's image

When Nathan Steffel's daughter Sophia died from a liver condition at just 6 weeks old, he reached out for someone to create a beautiful image of his little girl.

Raising kids in a 'low media' home

Can you imagine a life without TV or computers? Some parents are opting for a low-tech, screen-free life for their kids.

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

What's hot on EB

Win a Mountain Buggy nano

We?re giving away the new Mountain Buggy Nano - the lightweight travel buggy! So show us the little things that make you smile for your chance to win.

Be careful what you say, your baby is listening

The importance of speaking to your baby even if they are not old enough to answer back has been highlighted by new research.

The beautiful moment a baby was born at the side of a road

It's not where she expected to give birth, but mum Corrine Cinatl is delighted that her daughter's roadside arrival was captured in a series of beautiful photos.

Doctor sings first Happy Birthday to newborns

His job is to deliver babies, but this US obstetrician also has a unique way of celebrating the miracle of life.

The Nappy Collective starts new drive

It's that time of year when the dedicated volunteers at The Nappy Collective do their bit to help out mums and children in need - and they need your help.

Baby shower cake wrecks

From misshapen cake babies to questionable text, from odd colour choices to internal organ recreation, these are the baby shower cakes that taste forgot.

Photographer captures the beauty of adoption

The love of a family is usually tough to capture on camera. This is an exception.

Pregnancy progression photo ideas

Want to record your pregnancy as your belly grows? Here are some creative, fun ideas for photo shoots along the way.

The myths and facts about "normal" breastfeeding

When it comes to successful breastfeeding, there is a wide variety to what is "normal", according to new research.

Tin can craft and DIY ideas

Got a few old formula, Milo or coffee cans around the house? Use these fantastic upcycling ideas to create items for around the house and yard.

Dads meet their newborn for the first time

Emotional photos of two fathers meeting their newborn son have resonated with viewers worldwide, attracting thousands of Facebook likes and shares.

Skin safety isn't just a summer worry

Lax about the slip slop slap with your kids as weather turns cooler? Here's a reminder as to why we have to remain vigilant for our children?s future health.

Personalised baby gifts

We've scoured the internet to find gorgeous personalised keepsakes and nursery decor to record baby name and dates. They make great gifts for christenings, name days and birthdays! (All prices in AU.)

Creative sleeping baby photoshoots

See how some parents and photographers have captured sleeping babies in unusual positions and using different props.

DIY kitchen and food hacks

DIY your way to a better kitchen and make cooking easier with our clever hacks. (Some content reproduced with permission from mashable.com.)

Winter warmers for babies and toddlers

Your baby or toddler will be nice and snug in these beautiful and fun winter pieces. Most are hand-made or knitted, and they're all designed to keep your little one toastie - and adorable!

 

Mind, body, beauty, life

Making time for me

We look at your wellbeing, covering health, relationships, beauty and fashion, mind and body.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.