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We could all see this coming . . .
Dairy Farmers


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#1 StarandMoon

Posted 19 January 2013 - 11:52 AM


If anyone needs more motivation not to buy cheap supermarket milk:

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensl...f-1226557039013

sad.gif

#2 Lainskii

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:04 PM

Even though Woolworths milk has become 'permeate' free, I still buy Dairy Farmers or Pauls because the woolworths just doesn't taste the same, it is really watery. When we froth it in the coffee machine it is just crap.

I actually wrote a complaint (via email) to Woolworths as they weren't stocking the full fat Dairy Farmers, only Lite White and Smart Milk. They wrote back and said that they'd start stocking it (and they now do). Surprisingly it sells out really quick so I think I'm going to write back and ask them to stock more.

I agree with the article and as long as everyone keeps buying the $2 milk we will eventually have the choice of really really expensive fresh milk (because there will hardly be any dairy farmers left) or we'll be drinking cheap imported milk or UHT. It is a sad state of affairs and just one of the many things Coles and Wooloworths are doing to ruin Australian production. I'm sure they'll convince everyone via advertising why imported milk is better for you anyway and as long as it stays $2, most ignorant people will just keep buying it.




#3 Jane01

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:05 PM

Didn't the supermarkets increase the prices they paid for milk before they reduced milk to $1/l?

https://www.coles.com.au/Portals/0/content/...20v2%202011.pdf

So does this sad state of affairs reflect:
1. an inefficient industry that needs to consolidate to survive?
2. the fault of the milk processors?  
3. 50% of Australian milk is exported.  Lower prices may be a consequence of a rising $AU, not supermarket price wars.  If an $AU was previously worth 6 Chinese Yuan and now it is worth 9 Chinese Yuan, and the contract for milk supply is written in Chinese Yuan, the Australian company selling the milk is getting a third less in Australian dollar terms, but the Chinese company is paying the same amount.  Even if the contract has been renewed recently, prices aren't so elastic that you can just increase by a third and expect the same demand for your product.  All Australian export companies are facing the same problems.

#4 flakyfish

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:08 PM

Wow, that's massively worrying.

I used to occasionally buy the cheap milk, but after i read a thread on here a few months back, i switched to buying only name brand milk.

I also switched to buying Aussie-owned dairy products wherever possible, so switched to devondale cheese and butter instead of western star and mainland, liddels lactose free milk instead of Aldi, etc.

Sadly, neither coles nor woolies in my area sell fresh aussie owned milk, so we buy Dairy Farmers and A2 milk.

#5 Sif

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:19 PM

It's not a choice for everyone. For us the difference is either $18 a fortnight, or $45 a fortnight - in our house that is a huge amount of money... We have to buy the cheapest of everything because otherwise we can't keep our fortnight shopping for a family of six to between $3-350 (including everything)...

#6 StarandMoon

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:26 PM

QUOTE (Sif @ 19/01/2013, 12:19 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It's not a choice for everyone. For us the difference is either $18 a fortnight, or $45 a fortnight - in our house that is a huge amount of money... We have to buy the cheapest of everything because otherwise we can't keep our fortnight shopping for a family of six to between $3-350 (including everything)...


Sif, nobody's asking you to send your family bankrupt, just be aware that these milk prices are having serious longterm effects on dairy families.

Edited by StarandMoon, 19 January 2013 - 12:27 PM.


#7 MrsLexiK

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:29 PM

QUOTE (Jane01 @ 19/01/2013, 01:05 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Didn't the supermarkets increase the prices they paid for milk before they reduced milk to $1/l?

https://www.coles.com.au/Portals/0/content/...20v2%202011.pdf

So does this sad state of affairs reflect:
1. an inefficient industry that needs to consolidate to survive?
2. the fault of the milk processors?  
3. 50% of Australian milk is exported.  Lower prices may be a consequence of a rising $AU, not supermarket price wars.  If an $AU was previously worth 6 Chinese Yuan and now it is worth 9 Chinese Yuan, and the contract for milk supply is written in Chinese Yuan, the Australian company selling the milk is getting a third less in Australian dollar terms, but the Chinese company is paying the same amount.  Even if the contract has been renewed recently, prices aren't so elastic that you can just increase by a third and expect the same demand for your product.  All Australian export companies are facing the same problems.


This was my understanding as well. We I do tend to buy cheap milk but I tend to buy the UHT stuff because some weeks we may go through 3liters some none so if I buy 2 and keep them in the fridge I can't taste the difference when we need it.

#8 Lyra

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:32 PM

It's one of the reasons we switched to Aussie Farmers direct.

Sif, I can see your point but if they run the dairy industry into the ground then there will be no choice for any of us. Could you do half and half? ie half the cheap stuff and half the brand stuff? Or buy a bottle of the brand stuff when it is on special? Keep your support going that way

#9 kadoodle

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:33 PM

QUOTE (Jane01 @ 19/01/2013, 01:05 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Didn't the supermarkets increase the prices they paid for milk before they reduced milk to $1/l?

https://www.coles.com.au/Portals/0/content/...20v2%202011.pdf

So does this sad state of affairs reflect:
1. an inefficient industry that needs to consolidate to survive?
2. the fault of the milk processors?  
3. 50% of Australian milk is exported.  Lower prices may be a consequence of a rising $AU, not supermarket price wars.  If an $AU was previously worth 6 Chinese Yuan and now it is worth 9 Chinese Yuan, and the contract for milk supply is written in Chinese Yuan, the Australian company selling the milk is getting a third less in Australian dollar terms, but the Chinese company is paying the same amount.  Even if the contract has been renewed recently, prices aren't so elastic that you can just increase by a third and expect the same demand for your product.  All Australian export companies are facing the same problems.



The rising dollar has a lot to answer for with our primary producers.

So do we subsidise our farmers heavily in the same way the did in Europe, or leave them to sink or swim according to the market forces?  Either way, it's going to hurt.

Sif - How do 6 people manage to drink 18l of milk a fortnight?  That's a lot of moo juice!

#10 Prioritising Pooks

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:40 PM

We buy a mix of Great Ocean Road fresh for $2.99 and stock up on Devondale long life milk when it is on sale for inbetween shops. It is affordable. Like with eggs, I think you need to pay a little more to be ethical. I can totally understand why people on very low incomes have to go for whatever is cheapest Now, but in the long run lack of competition is bad for those on low incomes.

#11 gabbigirl

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:43 PM

We get the A2, I figure this one is OK and supports Australian farmers?

#12 Chaos in stereo

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:48 PM

QUOTE (kadoodle @ 19/01/2013, 01:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Sif - How do 6 people manage to drink 18l of milk a fortnight?  That's a lot of moo juice!


1.5l of milk per person per week is not excessive, is it? Especially not if there are teenaged boys involved.  wink.gif

#13 SusieGreen

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:52 PM

I do not ever buy the cheap milk and that is PURELY due to what I learnt on EB. I can't do it. Even as a single parent of 4 on a tight budget, I refuse to. Would be better for my pocket to, sure, but after reading a thread on EB I made a commitment to support our farmers.

Such a sad situation sad.gif

#14 tenar

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:53 PM

QUOTE (kadoodle @ 19/01/2013, 01:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The rising dollar has a lot to answer for with our primary producers.

So do we subsidise our farmers heavily in the same way the did in Europe, or leave them to sink or swim according to the market forces?  Either way, it's going to hurt.


Agreed.  It's not as cut and dried as the dairy industry would have us believe.  Which doesn't make them completely wrong, mind you.  

QUOTE
Sif - How do 6 people manage to drink 18l of milk a fortnight?  That's a lot of moo juice!


I often buy 8 or more litres of milk per week for 2 adults, toddler, preschooler.  So on average 2l per person per week.  That's only about 300ml a day each - easily used on cereal, with coffee/tea and a bit of milk in cooking, even if not everyone drinks it straight.  I can totally imagine a family of 6 drinking more than 18l a fortnight.

#15 SlightlyLeftFeral

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:53 PM

I am a sole parent on a low income and always buy the branded milk, for the exact reasons outlined. Having said that, we only go through 1 or 2 bottles a week.

#16 ubermum

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:53 PM

That's sad that people won't pay what fresh milk costs. You can either start paying full price and stop buying supermarket milk, or start drinking UHT, because that is where your choices are sending the industry. Hmmmm, cheap UHT from China, not sure I would drink that given their track record.

We don't have fresh milk in my house. We use powdered. Nobody can taste the difference.

QUOTE (kadoodle @ 19/01/2013, 01:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Sif - How do 6 people manage to drink 18l of milk a fortnight?  That's a lot of moo juice!


Not really. It's only 1.5L each per week. That's not even a cup (250ml) per day. Cereal, smoothies, cooking, tea/coffee, and kids milo we would easily go through that with 5 people.




#17 3plusme

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:57 PM

I converted to Pura Milk last year.


It's probably added $5 more to my shopping every week, but we can afford it.

#18 Bluestocking

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:58 PM

I have to drink a2. I hope they never go out of business or no more milk for me. It does have a much nicer taste to it, aside from not leaving me with the sensation of heavy pressure in my stomach that normal milk gives me.

#19 NunSoFeral

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:59 PM

QUOTE (kadoodle @ 19/01/2013, 12:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The rising dollar has a lot to answer for with our primary producers.

So do we subsidise our farmers heavily in the same way the did in Europe, or leave them to sink or swim according to the market forces?  Either way, it's going to hurt.

Sif - How do 6 people manage to drink 18l of milk a fortnight?  That's a lot of moo juice!


Yep.
It is a hard rain that is going to fall.

Lil Chicken - Hope the change brings you relief and good fortune.

As for 6 people drinking 18L p/f - we do closer to 20.

Cereal based breakfasts x 6, bottles, coffee machine, smoothies, milkshakes, eggy dishes.

#20 Breeder

Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:02 PM

We buy the $1 a litre milk from IGA, we have a very low income so we don't have much choice especially considering we go through 2 litres a day.
I'd like to be able to buy fresh raw milk straight from a local dairy and would be happy to pay $2 a litre for it. There needs to be de-regulation so we as consumers have more choice.
edit: IGA where we live always has PURA milk for $1.99 for two litres.

Edited by Breeder, 19 January 2013 - 01:30 PM.


#21 JJ

Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:04 PM

QUOTE (OnePinkStar @ 19/01/2013, 12:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I am a sole parent on a low income and always buy the branded milk, for the exact reasons outlined. Having said that, we only go through 1 or 2 bottles a week.


Same here. Unlike many things, this one is just not negotiable IMO.

#22 Roxi

Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:05 PM

I wouldn't judge anyone on a very low income who buys the cheapest milk - for some it is the difference between having milk, and no milk at all.

I think the best people to target are those who can afford to buy the more expensive stuff.  I will stop buying the cheap stuff from now on.

Is there any brand that is better to buy? I assume all the fresh milk will be produced here in Australia?

Edited by Roxi, 19 January 2013 - 01:07 PM.


#23 IShallWearMidnight

Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:07 PM

we buy powdered milk as we don't drink much, but when we expect guests we but local 'nice' milk.
the homebrand stuff doesn't taste as good

#24 Jane Jetson

Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:08 PM

QUOTE
That's sad that people won't pay what fresh milk costs. You can either start paying full price and stop buying supermarket milk, or start drinking UHT, because that is where your choices are sending the industry.


This is a bit of a concern for me, as well. I wouldn't like to see creamer become as frequently offered as I've seen it elsewhere, either. Yeuch.

We usually buy Canberra Milk here (and we get through a worrying amount of it given DH is lactose intolerant and shouldn't be drinking it!), or sometimes Riverina Fresh or Daisy Milk. (Does anyone know who owns Daisy and where their milk is from? Their website isn't all that thorough.)

#25 Mumto1feral

Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:12 PM

QUOTE (SusieGreen @ 19/01/2013, 01:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I do not ever buy the cheap milk and that is PURELY due to what I learnt on EB. I can't do it.


Why? What's wrong with cheap milk?





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