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BLW and the new guidelines
introducing food at four months


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#1 Lorem ipsum

Posted 18 January 2013 - 04:31 PM

I am interested in a BLW approach for DS, who is currently 15 weeks.

From what I have read, it is unlikely that a 4 month old would be ready for BLW, so what do you think would be the best approach?  Wait until closer to 6 months or start traditional weaning at 4 months then switch over?

Of course I will wait until he shows signs of readiness not go by the calendar either way.

#2 happening

Posted 18 January 2013 - 04:38 PM


We did BLW and to be honest, although we started just after 6 months, I don't think DD really ingested anything much before about 8 months.  She now eats peanuts, dairy, seafood, honey etc.

There were no intolerance issues at all.





#3 B.Nasty

Posted 18 January 2013 - 04:51 PM

I did BLW with the second and third. I started giving food at 6 months but neither really ate until about 9 months. Both DS2 and DS3 are under paeds care as well and the advice I was given by them was specifically to IGNORE the 4 month information going around. When I saw the CHN I was expecting her to advise me to start at 4 months but she didn't. She too told me to start at 6 months because they don't support the 4 month trend. Just as well because neither were ready even by 6 months anyway but still. I'd get a second and third opinion before starting at 4 personally. I would never do BLW at 4 months either.

#4 Leha

Posted 18 January 2013 - 05:02 PM

I spoon fed my DS the traditional way from 4 mths until 6 mths. He was a very hungary baby and bm wasnt cutting it.

I then started letting him try bits of food for himself but as pp said he didn't eat much  until closer to 8 or 9 mths. I still spoon fed occasionally but mostly just let him experiment with food for himself. The looks we used to get in restaurants when we would order him spag Bol and just let him dig in. My friends and family all though I was mad but they can see that it worked and now he eats anything and is the best eater i have seen amoung all my friends kids.

I would just let your baby take the lead. My DS was very ready for solids early but dd was not until 6 mths.

#5 SlightlyLeftFeral

Posted 18 January 2013 - 05:13 PM

Like PP's I started BLW at 6 months although it was closer to 8 or 9 months that she actually got it.

#6 ~faerydust~

Posted 18 January 2013 - 05:22 PM

There are a lot of different guidelines around. I choose to follow the ABA and WHO advice, which is exclusive breastmilk until 6 months. We then began BLW. From memory I think both girls actually picked up food off my plate and ate it a week before they hit 6 months, I took that as readiness.

#7 Lorem ipsum

Posted 18 January 2013 - 05:24 PM

Yes I'm not really concerned if he isn't 'eating' per se until later. I was just wondering about the earlier food exposure to supposedly reduce allergies

#8 MrsWidget

Posted 18 January 2013 - 05:57 PM

QUOTE (~squiggle~ @ 18/01/2013, 06:22 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
There are a lot of different guidelines around. I choose to follow the ABA and WHO advice, which is exclusive breastmilk until 6 months. We then began BLW. From memory I think both girls actually picked up food off my plate and ate it a week before they hit 6 months, I took that as readiness.

This is what we did.

#9 bjk76

Posted 18 January 2013 - 06:20 PM

I also followed the WHO guidelines and introduced solids to DS one week before he turned 6 months. He now has a peanut allergy. Who knows if they are actually linked or not, in his case? If we have another child though, I'll introduce solids earlier, just in case.

#10 kay11

Posted 18 January 2013 - 06:32 PM

My 4 month old DD just grabbed the spoon from my hand and jammed it in. Pretty baby led in my opinion. We co-spoonfed (if that's a word - she had a spoon and I had a spoon - although mostly she just ended up with both of them anyway) for a few weeks and by six months she was mostly onto finger foods.

It might be controversial but I'm not a believer in BLW being a big deal. It's called finger foods. Some babies prefer it (eg my DD) and some aren't fussed (eg my DS who was happily spoonfed and wasn't keen on finger foods). You'll very quickly find out what type of kid you have when you sit them in the high chair and start feeding them. Follow their lead in other words.



#11 lucky 2

Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:17 PM

What new guidelines?
I read that the revised NHMRC Infant Feeding Guidelines will be out in Feb but I wont hold my breath, they were due out last Oct or Sept.

#12 Prioritising Pooks

Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:33 PM

Honestly there is a lot of conflicting advice out there about when to introduce solids and how.

When I saw specialists about DS's eczema and GORD, they were all VERY encouraging and approving on starting him on solids at 4 months. Same with my MCHN, who said she attended something at the children's hospital where they basically advised that the science is not conclusive either way and there is no evidence to not give a hungry 4 month old some food. Same with my GP, and staff at the sleep school. DS was formula fed, so I have come across an attitude that he was tainted anyway, so it's less of an issue...

But I think if your baby ramps up like mine did, he was taking 8 full bottles a day and still seemed unsatisfied, well then you have to trust your gut while knowing that it's not really medically ill-advised.

DS is now 11 months old and has been exposed to pretty much everything, except raw strawberries and shellfish due to allergies on his father's side.

He also feeds himself pretty much everything except liquidy things like yoghurt and soup.

#13 Lokum

Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:47 PM

BLW is about the baby being in charge... so provided they can sit reasonably well in a high chair for 10 minutes, you could put food in front of them from 4 months. The argument goes that a child's capacity to pick food up and put it in his mouth roughly corresponds with his gut's readiness for food.

A 3 month old just cant pick up a bit of carrot and put it in his mouth and eat it. A non-ready 5 month old won't either.   In this sense, BLW is reassuring because you're not 'feeding them,' you're providing them with an opportunity which they may or may not take up, so you can't get it wrong.

(Caveat - unless the child has some developmental problems of fine/gross motor, which means they ARE hungry, but can't get the food to their mouth.)

We started with DS1 around 5 and a bit months. Gave him preloaded spoon with a bit of apple puree which he quickly licked off (though about 1/2 went in his hair), and some bits of nectarine which he happily gummed. BYy7 months he was eating toast for breakfast, and had been exposed to eggs and peanut butter. At 8 or 9 months he was stripping chop bones and chicken drumsticks. No allergies here, and BF until he self-weaned at 15 months.

Will follow DS2's lead, and realistically he'll probably be exposed to food (handed by his brother) around the same time. We won't push purees on him at 4 months, but I won't be holding off for the magical 6 month date either.

#14 lucky 2

Posted 18 January 2013 - 11:09 PM

QUOTE
DS was formula fed, so I have come across an attitude that he was tainted anyway, so it's less of an issue...

Pooks, it's not to do with being tainted (one would hope), I think it relates to the fact that a formula fed baby has a very narrow exposure to substances/food because formula is static/unchanging, some people even advocate giving baby different kinds of formula to increase the range (I read something years ago, could be rubbish though).
Your baby did have breast milk for a while so he did have more exposure, that's a good thing!
It makes sense to me to consider the diet of a baby prior to starting solids when making recommendations about solids.

#15 CallMeFeral

Posted 18 January 2013 - 11:10 PM

DD started food at 4 months old, she was ravenous as I was having supply issues.
We tried the old rice cereal and she just couldn't do it, then I read about BLW, and got a banana, cut the skin off about an inch and a half down from the top, and gave it to her. She pinned the thing somehow between her two arms and gnawed off a full inch of it, I kid you not. She didn't have finger control but she could still hold it between her arms, and being able to control what went in and when, seemed to make her have no trouble eating it - whereas with the rice cereal the tongue thrust thing was still happening and it was just a big mess.

Unfortunately nothing else was as easy as banana to hold, so we did kind of a half-BLW type thing where I would hold a piece of something soft - say steamed sweet potato - with my little pinky sticking out, and she'd hold this to control when the food came and went from her mouth. She could also eat cereal this way, with me holding the spoon and her controlling the pinky.

It really worked for me. For me the main deal with BLW was giving her control over her eating, not making her eat herself, and because she was underweight she needed to get in as much food as possible, and this technique did that (she was a REALLY hungry baby - at about 8 months old she could finish 3 weetbix in the morning!)

#16 IShallWearMidnight

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:46 AM

QUOTE (lucky 2 @ 18/01/2013, 08:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What new guidelines?
I read that the revised NHMRC Infant Feeding Guidelines will be out in Feb but I wont hold my breath, they were due out last Oct or Sept.

the draft says '22-26 weeks' so around 6 months.
my 4.5month old son is trying to eat our food, but I'm delaying him until 6 months, as our dd has gut issues, and I'm not risking his virgin gut just yet

#17 Alina0210

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:51 AM

6mths is what i would be doing and did do....... i love BLW and my kids thrived it...


#18 WaitForNasty

Posted 25 January 2013 - 08:31 PM

My DD was sitting reasonably well at 5 months so I started blw then. However, she rarely swallowed anything, and when she did it was minimal. At 6 months I made a concerted effort with the allergens. They only need a little so it doesn't have to interfere with blw - a dab of peanut butter sucked off my finger, a small mouthful of scrambled eggs spooned into her mouth the purée way, a suck on some strawberries, etc. haven't done seafood yet but thought a suck on prawns would do the job.


#19 Pop-to-the-shops

Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:40 PM

My pead advised us to start solids at four months, and start with things like eggs, milk, peanut butter straight away.
She is an expert in allergies, and we have a family history of allergies.

So we have been doing a mix of spoon feeding and finger food. My now six month old was well and truly ready for solids at four months and certainly can an tell me when he's had enough. He will grab the spoon, turn away, or start grizzling. He really loves his food though and doesn't reject much.




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