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Why would you NOT want a C-section?


120 replies to this topic

#1 miss_heidi

Posted 16 January 2013 - 07:58 PM

HI all,

I have a low lying placenta as seen on my 29 weeks scan (plus shortened cervix with funneling) so am at risk of PTL.  I have another scan booked at 34 weeks to see if the placenta moves up, i dont know how many cm it is at the moment.  OB told me that if it hasnt moved then i liekly wont be able to deliver vaginally and will need a c-section.

I have been reading a bit through threads and forums about low placenta and c-sections, with many different responses from women, some really dreading or against the c-section.

I never considered it before because as a public patient i figured I was delivering vaginally unless there was an emergency.  
as a first time mum, who really doesnt know much about c-sections vs vaginal births, i am wondering - why woudl you not want a c-section?  The prospect doesnt seem all that bad to me, it seems to me to be the way to avoid trauma and terrible tearing, but maybe Im really missing something that I should know in regards to mum or baby health?

(excuse my ignorance!)

Thanks for the advice original.gif

Edited by miss_heidi, 16 January 2013 - 07:59 PM.


#2 miss_heidi

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:01 PM

Ill add that i wanted a vaginal birth as I have heard it is better for babies lungs and provides a mouthfull of bacteria during the passage out which can assist in immune maturation, but outside of that Im not sure of why people would be sooo against it?

#3 Bam1

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:03 PM

It's an operation so there is more risk and the 6 week recovery with no driving was enough to make me only want one if medically necessary

#4 Steggles

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:03 PM

It's major surgery. Not a nick!

#5 FiveAus

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:04 PM

It's major abdominal surgery with a long recovery time, it's not just another way to have a baby.

#6 bikingbubs

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:05 PM

its major surgery, and with that comes risks.  i have had 2 c/s despite wanting vaginal births

#7 bakesgirls

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:05 PM

It's major surgery, that carries all the risks that surgery comes with. Unless medically indicated, I don't want someone cutting me open.

There are also risks for the baby including being cut by the scalpel and respiratory problems. There is an increased chance of needing a hysterectomy. Scar tissue and adhesions may cause long term pain. Then there's increased risk of ectopic pregnancy, placenta previa (where the placenta has grown over the lowest part of the uterus obstructing the cervix) and placenta accreta (where the placenta is abnormally attached to the uterine wall) in subsequent pregnancies.

Edited by bakesgirls, 16 January 2013 - 08:16 PM.


#8 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:08 PM

I don't have a problem having a csection if the event arises. I would much prefer a planned csection than an emergency one though.

Anecdotally everyone I know who had a planned csection vs emergency csection recovered much better from it.

There are risks with a csection but it doesn't put me off.

#9 TinyTeddys

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:08 PM

I might be the wrong person to reply as I've never had a C/S....I might also be wrong (outdated?) with my reasons but the two for me is that:
* You don't get 'skin to skin' straight away and in some hospitals bubs are taken away while mums are stitched up and in recovery. In saying this but, some hospitals are changing there practices...
* You are limited in what you can do phisically...some people can't drive for 6weeks post C/S.

#10 miss_heidi

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:09 PM

Hmm ok.. My sister-in-law has had two, first one was emergency and second elective, and my best friend had an emergency c-section, and i guess they didn't really mind the recovery period.  Definitely my SIL has mentioned her second c-section, the elective, she recovered much faster.

Another really good friend recently had a VBAC, and has mentioned the damage it did to her nether regions...  But still didnt regret the VBAC..

I am reading up more on it now...

Edited by miss_heidi, 16 January 2013 - 08:09 PM.


#11 Guest_AllegraM_*

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:09 PM

My emergency c-section recovery was quite easy but from speaking to others, that is not the norm. I am trying to avoid a c-section this time because:

Not driving for 6 weeks is a nightmare
You are not meant to do heavy lifting afterwards. Not so good with a toddler
There is some evidence that the actual birth process has health benefits for the baby
The baby comes when ready
Once you have a c-section, your future births are more likely to be c-sections. Each c-section increases the risk of complications. Should not be a big issue if you are planning a small family but it is something to seriously consider if you are planning 3 plus kids.
It is fun waiting for labour to start! (well I enjoyed it)

#12 Bluemakede

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:09 PM

The 6 weeks not driving puts me off even more than the fact that it is major surgery.

#13 KT1978

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:10 PM

Because my aunt, who was a theatre nurse, described to me the "pulling bits out" so they can dig down to where the baby is. Ick.  huh.gif

She freaked me out for life.  biggrin.gif

#14 asdf89

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:10 PM

C-sections can also cause more complications for future pregnancies ( uterus adhering to your bladder, placenta can grow through your scar etc)

My personal view is that our bodies are designed to birth vaginally... HOWEVER events can conspire to make that not possible or safe and there should be no judgement i.e. 'too posh to push' (which is silly coz I don't think major abdominal surgery is the easy way out of any situation Tounge1.gif)

#15 Swarley

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:11 PM

I wouldn't choose major surgery with risks without giving the natural alternative a go first.
Even though it hurts like a mofo, I love the feeling I get after giving birth. It would also bug me to not know what natural labour feels like.

Disclaimer: I don't care what others choose. This is just my personal feelings for me original.gif

#16 Suz01

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:14 PM

I was up bouncing around after both vaginal deliveries. More active and have little support where we live so I'm glad to be so mobile. I drove home from the hospital as DH was working, so very little change in our weekly routines.

I would do what doc recommended either way. Nothing against CS.

#17 Lainskii

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:15 PM

My first was a vaginal and second was c sect (had to have it due to risk to baby), I'd personally take a vaginal delivery any day. I know lots of others disagree but the c sect was soooooo painful the next day whereas with the vaginal I was up and walking around about an hour afterwards. I had to have a episiotomy and it was sore for a little while but healed with no issues. With the c sect, the first three days were excruciating and for about a week after it was hard to do anything, incluing going to the toilet comortably. I couldn't pick up my DD for 5 weeks  sad.gif
I know you may not get a choice but despite the pretty picture some people paint about having a ceasar, it isn't a little cut, it is major abdominal surgery.

Hope everything gets ok for you OP

Edited by Lainskii, 16 January 2013 - 08:16 PM.


#18 -Belinda-

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:16 PM


Apart from what others have said, another thing is that my figure didn't bounce back in the same way as it did for my natural birth - the shape of my tummy isn't the same. Have heard others say the same thing.
Was also very drugged after the C-section, but was up and bopping around the next morning following the natural.

#19 miss_heidi

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:17 PM


Yeah my preference is to give it a go with VD, ive managed to psyche myself up for it after being terrified and have booked into classes and all that sort of thing, so this was a bit of a (unpleasant) surprise.

But in the end Ill go with whatever they recommend...  If the recommend a c-section, ill go with that.  If they say it has moved and I can go VD, then Ill go with that.  Im just hoping it moves!

#20 DeeofAdelaide

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:17 PM

Does anyone actually not drive for six weeks?

My ob would clear you to drive when you could stomp your foot without hesitating and comfortably look over your shoulder. Which was 10 days the first time and 12 the second.

IN the dozen mates who have had sections, all were driving at the three week mark.

I would imagine for a planned section it wouldn't be many people who weren't pretty well fully recovered by the 3 week mark.



#21 zande

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:18 PM

The thing is people who are considering/facing a c-section need to do their research and speak to people who've had c/s, so that a lot of the misconceptions mentioned in here are put to rest.

I had 2 c/s - I had immediate skin-to-skin contact, baby stayed with me the whole time in recovery, and for my second DD I breastfed in recovery. I definitely didn't have a 6 week recovery (and I don't know anyone for whom that was true), I was pretty much back to normal after a week and was back driving then too.

I had wonderful positive birth experiences and I hate that on EB all you hear are the horror stories and "myths" a lot touted by people who haven't had a c/s!!!

#22 Lickety Split

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:18 PM

DD was delivered via c-section. Reasons why I would prefer not to have one again this time around:
1. The recovery was very long, especially as my wound got infected. I was in hospital for seven days, but for a long time after I got home I found it difficult to get around.
2. It is painful. I was on a lot of pain medication and still in pain for a couple of weeks at least afterwards.
3. You're not supposed to lift anything heavy. I have a toddler.
4. You're not supposed to drive for 6 weeks afterwards. I live in a country town so this will be hard.
5. Trying to rest and recuperate after major surgery with a newborn that demands to be fed every hour (as my DD did) is FREAKING HARD and not exactly helpful to the healing process.
6. I had to be in recovery without DD (which I didn't know beforehand as I wasn't expecting to have to have a c-section) and I hated it. I really want skin to skin as soon as possible.
7. I had a pretty yucky c-section in general (can't be bothered going into the gory details here) and would really prefer not to have to do it again.

Edited by Lickety Split, 16 January 2013 - 08:22 PM.


#23 Lauren Bell

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:19 PM

QUOTE (TinyTeddys @ 16/01/2013, 09:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I might be the wrong person to reply as I've never had a C/S....I might also be wrong (outdated?) with my reasons but the two for me is that:
* You don't get 'skin to skin' straight away and in some hospitals bubs are taken away while mums are stitched up and in recovery. In saying this but, some hospitals are changing there practices...
* You are limited in what you can do phisically...some people can't drive for 6weeks post C/S.




Just wanna clear this up

I was having skin contact 10 mins later, and feeding 30 mins later.

I had baby on a Tuesday, was driving fine by that Sunday.  

I recovered really well and quickly THOUGH this is just my personal experience!

:-)

ETA sorry I didn't add anything helpful to your question I think the PPs have answered perfectly though ;-)

Edited by MissBB, 16 January 2013 - 08:20 PM.


#24 ~chiquita~

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:21 PM

QUOTE
It's major surgery, that carries all the risks   that surgery comes with. Unless medically indicated, I don't want   someone cutting me open.

In my situation, DS was IUGR and I knew he would spend time in NICU after being born in a hospital 40 minutes from my home. My OB wanted to book me in for a CS and I refused, I wanted to attempt a natural delivery first.

Lucky, expressing milk, driving to the hospital twice a day and the whole NICU experience was stressful enough. I couldn't have done it all coping with an injury as well.

#25 gemgirl

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:24 PM

I thought I'd have a csection, due to high BP, but now it looks like if all's going well we can aim for a vaginal birth. And then I went to a birth class yesterday and for the first time, found myself hoping for a vaginal birth. I think it'll be fun waiting for labour "is it happening?" "isn't it?" and I think it could be a nice process to go through with my partner. That said, I'm sure that when the time comes, I won't be thinking like this original.gif

Either way, whatever results in a birth of a healthy baby and healthy me is the way I want it to go original.gif



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