Jump to content

WOuld a bank let us do this?
Home loan/Financial advice


  • Please log in to reply
34 replies to this topic

#1 Ruf~Feral~es

Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:40 PM

Hi all,

I'm just throwing around some ideas at the moment, and think this might work!!!  

We are planning to demolish/rebuild our house.  Have already investigated the options of selling and rebuying etc, and staying where we are is the best financial option for us.

We also have 2 kids in private school, and not a lot of future savings.   And I will recieve a substantial inheritance in the future. sad.gif  Don't like to think about it much.  But the reality when your parents are in their 80's make it a "when", not an "if".  (So whatever we do now will not be indefinite.

Our borrowing capacity is over $1 mill (absolutely rediculous!!!) so we have the money to "service" whatever we do.

OK - so what I'm thinking is: happy.gif

We borrow enough to rebuild a new house, plus enough to cover the next 5 years of school fees.  The school fees money is left in the account (so we don't pay interest on it?) and used as necessary.

In the meantime we would also be making extra payments, which will also add up towards future school fees etc.  (Kids will be at school for another 10 years almost).

I suppose I see the school fees money as a safety net/security thing.  Is that strange?  

Is it true that if we don't use the money, we don't pay interest?  

What am I missing?  What are the pro's and con's of doing this?  Or is it just a strange way to go about it?  We could afford to jsut save the school fees, I suppose.  But the idea of having 5 years put away in the bank in advance, to redraw as we need it, just feels more comfortable to me.  Then any savings as my pay increases in the future etc will go towards the next 5 years - and fee increases.

(As I said, obviously eventually I will have enough money to pay it all out and be debt free.  sad.gif )

WDYT?  How would you do it?

#2 Feral Mozzie

Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:50 PM

I'm not sure why you want to do this - is it because it will give you a false sense of "savings"? Just be careful that you don't end up spending more money because you feel like you have cash sitting in the bank.

If you have the money sitting in an offset account, then you won't pay interest on it. You will have higher minimum repayments, because the loan amount will be higher.

As for whether the bank will let you - I'm not sure, but I imagine it will depend on how much the property is worth, and how much you want to borrow in total. If you are only borrowing 60% of its value, they might. If you want to borrow 110% of its value (including the school fees), you have buckleys.

Also, an inheritance isn't ever guaranteed - I wouldn't be banking on it.

#3 ~She~

Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:56 PM

I guess it depends on your loan setup but as far I understand from our own borrowing you are right that you only pay interest on what you spend. I can't see a bank taking much confidence in the whole inheritance as security though, that's the only thing I would be concerned about.

I have one child in private school and another that will start in a couple of years time so I can see the merit in your forward planning there, I wish we were in a position to begin my savings plan for education right now rather than it be something budgeted when the time comes. It would also afford you a lot more freedom yearly from your income.

We are halfway through a renovation project on a house that I just can't fall in love with, but love our location and would love to demolish and start again myself so I say if you can. then go for it biggrin.gif

#4 Coffeegirl

Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:58 PM

I don't know about the 'not paying interest part'. Unless you are talking about nit drawing down the full amount if the loan?  In this case I don't think think the money is there indefinitely, you have to draw it down in X amount of time of the bank takes back the offer.

My understanding is if you did take all the money and park the school fees in an offset account, you would still pay interest based on the total amount borrowed, then the amount sitting in the offset account would be used to lower the interest paid, but I think you'd be worse off based on current rates.

Either way you are putting yourself in more debt to the bank.  You said you could save the money yourself?  Then I would be doing this and putting the savings in an offset account, so it worked agains the money borrowed for the new build, but was still available when you needed it to pay fees.



#5 Ruf~Feral~es

Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:06 PM

QUOTE
As for whether the bank will let you - I'm not sure, but I imagine it will depend on how much the property is worth, and how much you want to borrow in total. If you are only borrowing 60% of its value, they might. If you want to borrow 110% of its value (including the school fees), you have buckleys.

Also, an inheritance isn't ever guaranteed - I wouldn't be banking on it.


The full amount borrowed would be about 60% of the finished house value..... (new houses in our area are around $1.2 mil.  We would be wanting about $700 000 all up).

As to the inheritance, we wouldn't be putting that forward as security.  But it is guaranteed in as much as my parents are very upfront with my brother and I as to who is getting what when they go.  They are forward planners! rolleyes.gif  (down to individual jewellery pieces etc).  They have quite a few properties to be split between the two of us.

Another option which have used in the past is to use one of their properties as security, but I am thinking with our current equity we shouldn't need to.

QUOTE
Either way you are putting yourself in more debt to the bank. You said you could save the money yourself? Then I would be doing this and putting the savings in an offset account, so it worked agains the money borrowed for the new build, but was still available when you needed it to pay fees


Thanks coffee girl.  And your other points are what I was wondering too.  I think this sounds like the logical way to go.  But I do like the plan of having it there "just in case".  And anything we add is a bonus for the future years beyond the initial 5.

QUOTE
It would also afford you a lot more freedom yearly from your income
.

I htiknk this is the attraction.  I know we can live comfortably(not extravagantly, jsut not "on the edge" as we have in the past), and it reduces my stress for the future.

Edited by Ruffles, 14 January 2013 - 05:09 PM.


#6 Feral Mozzie

Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:30 PM

QUOTE (Coffeegirl @ 14/01/2013, 05:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My understanding is if you did take all the money and park the school fees in an offset account, you would still pay interest based on the total amount borrowed, then the amount sitting in the offset account would be used to lower the interest paid, but I think you'd be worse off based on current rates.


Most mortgage offset accounts these days are 100% offset - so you don't pay any interest on the money that has been borrowed, then dumped straight into the offset account. We kind of did this when we got our mortgage (only put up 20% desposit when we had more, so we effectively borrowed more than we needed to). It means that because of the higher minimum repayments, we will have our reggae completely paid off in 6 years.

#7 cinnabubble

Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:45 PM

QUOTE
It means that because of the higher minimum repayments, we will have our reggae completely paid off in 6 years.


Tee hee.

#8 IsolaBella

Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:50 PM

With my grandmother turning 94 (grandfather passes away the week before he turned 90) personally I would not be counting on inheritance soon. My MIL is 81. Still kicking strong.



#9 KT1978

Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:51 PM

I wouldn't borrow extra, maybe a small redraw buffer only.

If you are saving for fees why do you need five years worth? Just save each week and pay each term. I liken what you are doing to buying bigger clothes, just makes it easier to put on weight because you have room!

How much is the land worth? Don't over capitalise on building. That's a big mortgage if prices go down and you need to sell. Inheiretence is never guaranteed and could be 15 years away.

#10 fancie

Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:58 PM



OP, we knocked down-rebuilt 6 years ago.

The amount we borrowed was $35,000 more than the builder's contract for the rebuild.  During the build, the builder would send us a completion of stage form which we would submit to the bank who would then release only those funds requested by the builder for that particular stage completion - for example: completion of the slab and framework, completion of the bricklaying and roof tiling etc.

Once the last of the stage completion requests had been paid to the builder (after handover of the house to us) were the additional funds deposited to our account.

Don't know whether this applies to our bank and loan conditions or all banks.  I would be very doubtful that the bank would release the funds to you prior to the build as they do not want you to do a runner with the money when they hold the mortgage over the block of land AND the added value of the future dwelling.

#11 Ruf~Feral~es

Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:52 PM

QUOTE (lsolaBella @ 14/01/2013, 03:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
With my grandmother turning 94 (grandfather passes away the week before he turned 90) personally I would not be counting on inheritance soon. My MIL is 81. Still kicking strong.


I only put the inheritance issue in as although we will take the mortgage over 25 years, realistically, we will not have it for that long.  DOesn't mean we are planning on my parents passing away within any time frame, but knowing them, they are not likely to live to 100+.  It's a non-issue, really.

QUOTE
Don't know whether this applies to our bank and loan conditions or all banks. I would be very doubtful that the bank would release the funds to you prior to the build as they do not want you to do a runner with the money when they hold the mortgage over the block of land AND the added value of the future dwelling.


That makes sense.  I suppose I was thinking that, at the end of the build, we would have the house, some money in the bank for the next few years, and enough income to pay it all back at a speed/timeframe that suits us.


QUOTE
If you are saving for fees why do you need five years worth? Just save each week and pay each term.

How much is the land worth? Don't over capitalise on building. That's a big mortgage if prices go down and you need to sell.


I know that sounds the best way to do it.  It just seems stressful, to be saving for fees etc and saving for the house, and and and.  I just like the idea of a "buffer", as I've said. And if we then pay back more, due to paying more than the minimum required on the loan anyway, then we can "return" the buffer in time.  But if we need it, it's there.

Going on other properties in our area (same street, even) I'd say land value is  worth about the $700 000 we are looking at.  A new house on our street recently sold for $1.25mil, so I don't think we are over-capitalising.  We are also planning to stay here for another 25 years or so (If things go according to plan, but you can never plan that long away shrug.gif ).  So not so worried about over-capitalising.

#12 Overtherainbow

Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:57 PM

I can see where the OP is coming from.  Interest rates on the mortgage is better than paying school fees by credit card and may be cheaper than any school payment option.

If you were to borrow 2 kids at $10K per year for 5 years
($100K) it would cost $215 838 over 30 years at an interest rate of 6%.  You would be paying an extra $115 838 in interest for their schooling.

It would also add an extra $600 per month in payments.

If you had several years until they start highschool and were to leave that money in an offset account, you would still be paying the additional $600 per month in payments but would not need to pay interest on that amount so the $600 would reduce the principal on the loan.  You would pay an additional $7200 per year on your loan until they start school.  If you calculated your school fees and divided it by 12 and paid that amount into your homeloan in advance, you would not be behind at all.  In fact your savings would then be working on your homeloan at a higher rate than an interest bearing account with no tax implications.

Negatives I see:  Not putting extra on the loan and paying far more in interest. Drawing the money out earlier and wasting it on nonschool fees.  Interest rates rising.

It's always good to rejuggle things.  Never rely on inheritance.

#13 Ruf~Feral~es

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:00 PM

QUOTE
It's always good to rejuggle things. Never rely on inheritance.


True.  I probably should have left that out.  Realistically though, we can afford it without..... just over more years.  I'm not relying on it. wink.gif

THanks for the other perspective though.  Youve calculated out what I was thinking. (I think ?)

#14 LittleListen

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:09 PM

And if one of you had a tragic accident that's a heck of a loan to pay back.

I wouldn't do it even if the banks would let me. Don't borrow trouble I say.

Borrow what you need to get the job done and save what you can. Borrowing a buffer is an easy way to convince yourself you are better off than you are...

#15 Peppery

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:15 PM

I obviously can only speak from my situation but I am currently in the process of building a house. The block of land is owned outright. To obtain a mortgage to build the house I have had to submit the final quotation from the builder. I also got approval to fund the landscaping  concreting, flooring etc. The final approval figure was based on quotations I had received in relation to these extras. The bank aren't going to hand the funds over to me. They will only pay the invoices for me

#16 MrsLexiK

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:26 PM

I know someone that did that an equity line or loan so was approved for a certain amount and could withdraw as need be. It was purely for school fees.

#17 MrsFeral247

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:27 PM

QUOTE (eyesabove @ 14/01/2013, 08:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Borrowing a buffer is an easy way to convince yourself you are better off than you are...


If you are worried about being able to pay the school fees, borrowing the money just gives a false security.

#18 Lokum

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:31 PM

QUOTE (eyesabove @ 14/01/2013, 08:09 PM)
15237756[/url]']
And if one of you had a tragic accident that's a heck of a loan to pay back.

I wouldn't do it even if the banks would let me. Don't borrow trouble I say.

Borrow what you need to get the job done and save what you can. Borrowing a buffer is an easy way to convince yourself you are better off than you are...


If one of them had a tragic accident, they might be waiting some months on insurance/TAC/lawsuit payout/super payout. That several months wait could see the kids school fees overdue and them kicked out of school, or the homeloan getting overdrawn.
Having the money sitting in redraw or an offset account gives you the buffer. We did this to facilitate my maternity leave (sort of.) We could have closed one of our mortgages - the property was completely paid off, well ahead of schedule. We left $100k in redraw.
If our babÅ· had been born with SN, or we had a big medical problem, or I couldnt/ didnt want to go back to work so soon, or we couldnt manage our one-income budget as well as we thought, or relatives overseas had an emergency, we had a decent buffer if $100k.

and if we only needed half, we could use the remainder to pay back itself until i returned to work etc. Sitting in redraw, we werent paying interest on it. We just had to make sure we didnt leave it on direct debit and accidentally autmotically close it. I think we actually left $100 owing, so the monthly repayments were like 1 cent.
The risks were that we frittered it away, or one of us got a gambling habit, but since we trusted each other and we were disciplined to get that far ahead in the first place it was good emergency money... Cos if the situation arose when we actaully needed it, that would be the time the bank would be least likely to lend it, IYKWIM?

Edited - DP

Edited by Lokum, 14 January 2013 - 07:40 PM.


#19 TillyTake2

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:38 PM

Just keep in mind that the inheritance could be many many years off. I have a grandmother still going strong at 95. She does have a lot of care needs (not medical) which will be using well over $100,000 a year. If your parents become frail (but not terminally ill) they could end up needing care costing $100,000+ yearly for many many years. Think 10-20 years...

She was a very wealthy woman in her late 70's early 80's. 20 years has changed a lot & she now only has her home & a few hundred thousand left.

Edited by TillyTake2, 14 January 2013 - 07:39 PM.


#20 Pop-to-the-shops

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:51 PM

You could use the equity in your new home to take out a line of credit, to use as a buffer.

But I would do it after the house is finished, and it is worth more.

We have a small line of credit, and pay no interest or fees, as we haven't touched it yet.

#21 roses99

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:53 PM

QUOTE (lsolaBella @ 14/01/2013, 05:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
With my grandmother turning 94 (grandfather passes away the week before he turned 90) personally I would not be counting on inheritance soon. My MIL is 81. Still kicking strong.

DH's grandmother turns 99 in August and her specialist reckons she has another five years left  original.gif

OP, we have an offset loan and we also pay extra repayments. That extra builds up over time and, should we need to access those extra repayments for an emergency, we could do so. The bank would charge us $20 for the transaction and we could access the full value of extra repayments. In your case, that could be your buffer for school fees. The benefit of doing it that way, though, is that the cash isn't there at your disposal. We can't see that money and we can only access it by meeting with the bank to request it. So there isn't the temptation to just spend it on a holiday. But if we absolutely needed it, we could get to it.

That's what I'd do. We did borrow a bit extra than we needed for our renovation, but we poured that money immediately back into the mortgage so that we wouldn't be tempted to spend it.



#22 Lifesgood

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:56 PM

QUOTE (eyesabove @ 14/01/2013, 08:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
And if one of you had a tragic accident that's a heck of a loan to pay back.

That's what life insurance is for.

OP - initially upon reading your post I thought 'what?! that's crazy!'. But after thinking about it a bit I think you should borrow more than you need regardless of the school fees. The build is likely to cost more than you think anyway, there are always unexpected costs and so long as you are disciplined and don't draw the extra money down for unnecessary things then you should be fine. If you get a line of credit instead of a traditional mortgage it will allow you more flexibility. For example you won't need an offset account as you simply don't draw down on the school fees until and if you need to. If you have saved the fees separately then you won't ever need to draw the surplus portion of your line of credit. It sounds like you can comfortably afford what you are doing.

We have an arrangement like this (two actually) and we use it like an overdraft - when we need to pay a large expense we draw it down from our surplus finance, and then we pay it back as quickly as possible. We are about to build an extension and renovate our house, and we have in effect applied for more finance than we think we need just so we don't have to worry about running out.

#23 Ruf~Feral~es

Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:04 PM

QUOTE
And if one of you had a tragic accident that's a heck of a loan to pay back.


Yes - that's what income protection and life insurance is for. wink.gif

As I said, I shouldn't have mentioned the inheritance.  We don't need it to be able to service the loan or make this happen in some way, shape or form.



Maybe the "line of credit" is what I'm looking for! biggrin.gif   I'll look into that further.


QUOTE
The risks were that we frittered it away, or one of us got a gambling habit, but since we trusted each other and we were disciplined to get that far ahead in the first place it was good emergency money...


That's kind of my thinking too.  We also have DH's mother overseas and need to have enough money in the bank for him to get on a flight at a moments notice if required.  We've always had a credit card with a $30 000 limit (not spent, obviously) which I'd like to get rid of.





#24 Ruf~Feral~es

Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:08 PM

A question - does a line of credit attract the same interest as the home loan?  And do they get paid off as two separate accounts, or are they combined?

Off to do some further research - but thought those of you "in the know" could probably explain it better than a bank website!

#25 Feral Mozzie

Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:10 PM

QUOTE (Lokum @ 14/01/2013, 08:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Cos if the situation arose when we actaully needed it, that would be the time the bank would be least likely to lend it, IYKWIM?

Edited - DP


That's exactly why we put our extra savings in an offset account, rather than taking out a smaller mortgage.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

Mum assists in own caesarean surgery

A mum who partly delivered her own twins during a caesarean has encouraged other women to take control of their birthing experience.

How to handle common childhood regressions

Regression can be a natural and common part of development prompted by a variety of factors, but that doesn't make it less frustrating.

Disgruntled dad's pram ad goes viral

When buying a second hand pram, there are lots of things to take into consideration. 

Man discovers he's a dad after finding 55-year-old letter

Discovering you are about to father a baby is startling enough - never mind finding out you have a 61-year-old son.

15 thoughts mums have during a tantrum

Ranging from mild to feral and triggered by events both minor and major, tantrums certainly keep life interesting.

Natural pain relief in the early stages of labour

While managing labour pains on your own can be daunting, there are a number of natural pain relief options to help you cope until you are admitted to hospital.

Forgotten Baby Syndrome claims the life of toddler

One baby dies every eight days in the back of a car in the US, victims of 'forgotten baby syndrome'.

For a brief time, I was touched by an angel

For a brief time, I was touched by an angel. You stole my heart, and changed me into the women I am today.

Chrissie Swan has reached her "sex quota"

Chrissie Swan says she and her partner have sex once a year due to her fear of falling pregnant.

Chinese woman gives birth to quintuplets

After six years of trying for a baby, a couple’s dreams have come true many times over after the mum gave birth to quintuplets this week.

Five-year-old shoots nine-month-old brother dead

A nine-month-old baby boy died on Monday after he was shot in the head by his five-year-old brother in their grandfather's home.

'Is that baby yours?'

She is my daughter. I gave birth to her. I nurse her. But she doesn't have any of my genes.

Episiotomy in childbirth: not just 'a little snip'

Episiotomies have a place in maternity care – and can occasionally save lives – but should not be performed routinely.

Toddler aggression not caused by language delays after all: study

The logic was that children who don’t have the language to fully express themselves will lash out when they’re misunderstood. Not anymore.

Why we chose to adopt a child with Down sydrome

Everyone in foster care (and really in life) has something that makes them more vulnerable. We just know what our son's is.

Object of desire

Curvy mums make clever babies

Scientists appear to have discovered why women have evolved to have more curves than men – shapely thighs and bottoms lead to healthier babies.

'We'll make sure they know how much she loved them'

A first-time mum will never get to hold her four newborns, dying shortly after giving birth to the quadruplets.

The baby names NZ knocked back in 2014

A New Zealander has tried to name their baby Senior Constable but didn't get away with it - and numbering children is also a no-no.

How can you go into labour without knowing you're pregnant?

For most of us, the idea that a woman could carry a child to full-term without knowing she is pregnant is mind-boggling.

Will you get to the hospital in time?

Worrying your baby will be delivered by the roadside is a common concern for many mothers-to-be. So how likely are you to be caught short?

Win an Octonauts prize pack

To celebrate the launch of Octonauts Live! Operation Reef Shield, a spectacular underwater adventure live on stage, we are giving away an amazing Octonauts prize pack to one lucky fan.

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

What's hot on EB

Stars help save choking babies

It's an important lesson to learn, but one that busy new mums and dads might overlook until it's too late.

New Girl star Zooey Deschanel pregnant

Actress Zooey Deschanel is expecting her first child with her producer boyfriend Jacob Pechenik.

16 times 'dad reflexes' saved the day

Of course, in some cases they may be the ones who actually got their child into a precarious position in the first place, but we'll ignore that for now.

Couple's 'non-traditional' pregnancy announcement goes viral

Knowing you are not the father of your pregnant wife's baby would usually indicate a rocky relationship ahead for traditional parents.

The trials and tribulations of identical triplet newborns

Pip Donnelly is still playing spot the difference with her newborn identical triplets, Isabelle, Georgina and Frankie.

Win an Octonauts prize pack

To celebrate the launch of Octonauts Live! Operation Reef Shield, a spectacular underwater adventure live on stage, we are giving away an amazing Octonauts prize pack to one lucky fan.

Earthquake baby thriving five years on

Jenny Alexis is lucky to be alive after spending four days buried in the rubble of the 2010 Haitian earthquake, but now she's a thriving five year old.

Please don't say I'm lucky because I was adopted

On the one hand I was having a regular life with friends and sports and sleepovers and school. But I was also always wondering: Did my mother love me? What was wrong with me?

An open letter to non-parents who offer advice on child-rearing

Kitty, when you’re the parent of my child you’re welcome to wade in with an opinion – but until then, I’d prefer you to have a supportive ear and a glass of wine ready.

Couple arrested over baby gun video

A US couple faces charges after investigators say they found mobile phone videos showing the woman's 12-month-old daughter putting a handgun in her mouth.

NSW Health dumps 10-year limit on frozen embryos

A 10-year time limit on storing frozen embryos that were created with donor sperm has been dropped by the NSW government.

How my happy-go-lucky husband became a monster

Sharan Nicholson-Rogers watched her husband change from a happy-go-lucky police officer into an unpredictable man prone to violent and emotional outbursts.

Dads-to-be experience hormonal changes, too

Dads-to-be experience hormonal changes in line with their pregnant partners, a new study shows.

'They were just doing their job': mum of toddler killed in police chase gone wrong

"They were just doing their job. I feel so sorry for them. It is all just too sad."

Miscarriages to be formally recognised by NSW government

Women who miscarry will be able to obtain an optional "recognition of loss" certificate as a formal recognition of their often heartbreaking loss.

Cafe cubby house 'too noisy' for neighbours

Teenage parties, domestic disputes, or raucous late night pubs are the things that usually come to mind when you think neighbourhood noise complaints.

Dad films baby playing with snake

Most parents would not consider a snake an appropriate playmate for their baby, but a US dad who filmed his daughter playing with a python has defended himself against criticism.

Clever breastfeeding products

Check out this range of products designed to help make your breastfeeding journey more enjoyable, manageable and convenient.

 

Back to School Offer

Findababysitter.com.au

We've got you covered for this school year. Use www.findababysitter.com.au to meet local nannies now.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.