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How much are these 'job perks' worth to you?


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#1 Wineandchocolate

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:35 AM

I'm currently considering a few new job opportunities and as you might expect, there are pros and cons to each.  So I'm curious to know what sort of monetary value others might place on particular perks (i.e for 'Perk A' you would be prepared to cop an annual salary loss of '$X thousand', Perk B is work $Y thousand etc).

So, what are these perks worth to you:

1.  A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.
2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.
3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)
4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.
5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)
6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.
7.  Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.
8. Permanent position vs. contract position.

And what if all these perks were offered in the one job?  How much of an annual gross salary loss would you be prepared to wear (either in absolute terms e.g. $5,000, $10,000 etc. or as a percentage of your current salary)?

Thanks original.gif

ETA: assume the job satisfaction in each case is the same, ie. you're not going to a 'lesser' job or one that you don't actually want to do for the sake of these other benefits.

Edited by Mummy2907, 14 January 2013 - 07:45 AM.


#2 lozoodle

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:41 AM

1.  A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.
I'm not fussed by 1h 15 mins travel, I would rather travel to a more suitable job than pick something that was closer to home.

2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.
Flexibility is important with 2 (soon to be 3) kids.

3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)
So so. It wouldn't be a sole deciding factor for me.

4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.
Not a deciding factor for me, happy to walk.

5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)
Definitely would prefer the easy public transport option.

6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.
Depends what role I was going into. If the job I was going for was what I wanted to do I woudln't be worried about down the track advancement.

7.  Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.
Important.

And what if all these perks were offered in the one job?  How much of an annual gross salary loss would you be prepared to wear (either in absolute terms e.g. $5,000, $10,000 etc. or as a percentage of your current salary)?
I wouldn't be prepared to lose salary, other than going to part time and then being paid pro rata.

#3 PatG

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:44 AM

I think I'd need a ball park figure of what salary A was - for some people they couldn't afford to have any drop in salary....  I'm very numbers oriented and I'd have to break it down into how many hours saved (travel) how much money saved (flexible hours mean no after school care for example, less travel expenses) and then look at it.

Currently I don't think I could choose to have a net drop in income of more than 10% regardless of the associated perks.

#4 JRA

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:48 AM

Generally if you get lots of salary packaging it would be with a NFP, and the salary would be less. Given you are paying less tax, you would need to crunch the numbers on how much it actually is different. Most people I know make the most use of that by doing mortgage and c/c. They pay for everything on their c/c so as much of their living expenses that the packaging cover are paid pre-tax. Depending on a salary, that is a huge perk.

For me the travel 40mins a day vs 2h 30min is huge. In affect it is nearly two hours less a DAY you are "working". Once again think of that in your calculations. Then add the extra 15min walk, which is another hour a day. That is nearly three hours extra "not at home" in one job vs the other.



#5 StopTheGoats

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:48 AM

I'm on a relatively high salary and have only a few of those perks so I'd definitely be prepared to lose $$ for lifestyle. The travel time, option to go part time and the ability to pick my hours would make a huge difference to my life. Salary packaging and 15 minute walk time wouldn't really even factor in.

I'd be prepared to lose $20k-$30k or even a bit more. If I was on a lower salary of course this would be different.

I'm currently interviewing for roles where I'm losing $20k+ to try to get some work/life balance. To be honest though I wouldn't even consider a job with the sort of travel times you've mentioned with the second role. That's far too long to be away from my family and I'm used to living in the inner city only a short commute to work and it makes a huge difference.

Edited by JuniorSpies, 14 January 2013 - 07:51 AM.


#6 ubermum

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:51 AM

Hmmm hard.

I start my new job in March.  Given where I live, I have very limited access to public transport. Driving time for me was the equal for a job in the city as a job in a regional town. I chose the regional town. Onsite parking for free, no traffic hassles adds time to my day.

The perks you mention are all pretty important. Low commuting time and freedom to choose hours would be my choice while I have young children. Sadly, these are things that I don't have any control over. If I planned to have more children, it would be great to have the part time option.

My job has heaps of salary packaging options as well as lots of scope for career advancement. Given where I am in my career, this is the most important to me.

All those perks in one job could easily be worth $5-12K  Salary packaging alone for me is worth $6K. Cutting down commute time reduces travel costs and choosing hours lowers your reliance on childcare. Also, how much worth do you put on having extra time with your kids. To me, that is worth alot. A job with all the perks you mention could pay me $15k less and be worth it.

#7 Fr0g

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:53 AM

1. A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.
Commuting over one hour would be a significant downer for me - I currently drive 45 minutes one way and with 2 kids at school, it's hard for me and I feel pressured to get to work on time and leave on time.  Our work is moving closer to home in the next few months, but our free parking will go and we'll have to pay to park.  It's grumble-inducing, but not a deal breaker.

2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.
The freedom to organise work around school events etc would be good.  I kind of have it with part time work, anyway.

3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)
I've never known such salary packaging perks, so I can't comment. I live without them in my current department, so probably wouldn't entice me too much.

4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.
Makes no difference.  A 15 minute walk is good for you!

5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)
Irrelevant as a car driver to me.

6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.
Depends how ambitious you are.  I would at least need a few rungs to climb!

7. Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.
I ONLY take positions which can be considered part-time, otherwise I'd turn a position down.  It's where I'm at with a child in the junior primary years.

8. Permanent position vs. contract position.
I'd nearly ALWAYS take permanent over contract.  In fact, I'm sitting in a horrible permanent position, but have been out on contract for nearly 2 years.  For me, stability is a big incentive.  If I am asked to relinquish my permanent position, I will go back into it for a while, then go out again on contract (yes, I'm one of "those" workers).  

And what if all these perks were offered in the one job? How much of an annual gross salary loss would you be prepared to wear (either in absolute terms e.g. $5,000, $10,000 etc. or as a percentage of your current salary)?
Depends what you're on!  For me, like Lozoodle, I work part-time at a prorata - so for my situation, which works for me, I take home 20% less than what I could be.  (I work 0.8 FTE).  I also know, in the back of my mind, that I have another 20% in salary sitting in the wings, when DS starts high school and the fees hike significantly.

Edited by FrogIsAFrogIsAFrog, 14 January 2013 - 07:56 AM.


#8 ~ky~

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:53 AM

It really depends on the percentage of salary lost, not the actual salary lost. For all we know, the job could carry a salary of between 30 and 100K ... that's a huge range for us to speculate upon.

Personally, 9 years ago we left a really well paying job to move somewhere where the family was happier, commute times easier and more time together. But, that was for us and as a result of PND etc. Incidentally, within a couple of weeks there were no signs of my PND any more so it was the best move for us. Life has moved on since then but that one move meant that we got the chance to move on instead of spiralling downwards.



#9 Iwantitall

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:55 AM

I have all of these perks except I am on contract (state govt job   rolleyes.gif ). I do get paid less than if I was doing the same job in the private sector but these perks are why I wanted this job in the Public Sector.  I have four Children and before going on  Maternity leave for #4 I was full-time.  Not only am I going back part-time but I can choose my hours. I only have a 20min commute with on site parking and if I choose public transport the Bus stops right outside the door (the advantages of working at a Tertiary Education Facility).

I will add I do not need to work Financially, but I love my job and flexibility like this with lots of advancement options is very hard to come by.

Eta I currently get paid approx $10000 per year less per year (of what is an average wage...not at all high).

Edited by beljane, 14 January 2013 - 08:04 AM.


#10 Guest_Dinah_Harris_*

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:57 AM

1. A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.
Absolutely hugely important for me.  That is almost two hours of time I could be at home with my family.

2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.
Flexibility is important, though it depends on the flexibility of your partner's job too.

3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)
Doesn't really bother me, but the salary packaging could make a big difference once the numbers are crunched.

4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.
I rather like walking, so doesn't bother me.

5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)
Definitely would prefer the easy public transport option.

6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.
Depends - if I were getting back into the workforce and taking a menial job, then advancement is an absolute must.  But if the job in itself were satisfying and what I wanted, then it wouldn't really bother me.

7. Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.
Important, very important, as you never really know what can change in your family circumstances.

8. Permanent or contract?  Permanent for sure.  In today's job climate, it's just not that easy to hop around jobs.

And what if all these perks were offered in the one job? How much of an annual gross salary loss would you be prepared to wear (either in absolute terms e.g. $5,000, $10,000 etc. or as a percentage of your current salary)?
I would probably be prepared to lose $10k-$15k or so, but it depends on the salary range.  If you are talking about a $40k per year job then I probably wouldn't be prepared to lose anything.  For $80k a year, then that's a little different, if that makes sense.

Edited by Dinah_Harris, 14 January 2013 - 07:59 AM.


#11 katiebear26

Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:57 AM

without knowing which job has which, my preferences would be:

1.  A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes

2. working hours - not too fussed. 9-5 is standard, if it were strict 6am-2pm i'd have a problem though! guess it depends on your circumsances.

3.  Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent,  credit card, gym membership, etc) - definitely this one. i used to work for an employer with such benefits and it was fantastic, increased take home pay by heaps and tax time was great too.

4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away. - if the 1 1/4hour cummute has a 15 minute walk on top of, then i'd go for the on site parking. plus on site might be safer, especially if you leave work later during winter and it's dark.

5. Easy public transport access - definitley easier transport. all you need is one of those options to be late and it stuffs your whole day up.


6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track - depends on what you want and how long you want to stay there. ATM i'm not into advancement as i'm focusing on family life but in maybe 7-8 years time i think i'll be ready for something else. i wouldn't normally stay at the one employer for that long though, so for me advancement opportunities are not required.


7.  Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option. - again depends on what you want, part time is a requirement for me (see previous point).


8. Permanent position vs. contract position. - are there many jobs around in this field? if so i wouldn't be worried about a contract role. if it was hard to find a job i would prefer the permanent position.

lucky thing - you have some good options there!

#12 CallMeFeral

Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:00 AM

Wow tough one.

1. about $50k. I know that's a lot, but I've done a commute like that and it's soul destroying.
2. about $20k. Hard to compare though because normally travelling during peak hours adds travel time so interacts with the above
3. Just the dollar value of the tax benefit of whatever I planned to package.
4. Say $20k
5. Again hard as interacts with no. 1 - maybe $20k
6. $50k
7. $50k
8. Nothing really. I'd take perm over contract if there were both available, but perm is still easy to get rid of people in. If it were perm in government where it's hard to get rid of people, then maybe $20k.

QUOTE (Mummy2907 @ 14/01/2013, 08:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm currently considering a few new job opportunities and as you might expect, there are pros and cons to each.  So I'm curious to know what sort of monetary value others might place on particular perks (i.e for 'Perk A' you would be prepared to cop an annual salary loss of '$X thousand', Perk B is work $Y thousand etc).

So, what are these perks worth to you:

1.  A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.
2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.
3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)
4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.
5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)
6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.
7.  Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.
8. Permanent position vs. contract position.

And what if all these perks were offered in the one job?  How much of an annual gross salary loss would you be prepared to wear (either in absolute terms e.g. $5,000, $10,000 etc. or as a percentage of your current salary)?

Thanks original.gif

ETA: assume the job satisfaction in each case is the same, ie. you're not going to a 'lesser' job or one that you don't actually want to do for the sake of these other benefits.



#13 SeaPrincess

Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:03 AM

Seem of those things can be broken down to cost - fuel, maintenance and wear and tear on your car, for example, if you compare the commute times.

For me, the biggest single item would be the commute time. A total of 2.5 hours would have an enormous impact on my whole family, not just me, and I don't think it would be an option for us.

Edited by SeaPrincess, 14 January 2013 - 08:04 AM.


#14 GeminiSix

Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:10 AM

Depends on ages of your children, availability of childcare/family closeby, whether you are the primary income earner or not.

So from my perspective (3 kids - 1 primary school, 1 kindergarten this year, 1 baby, non-primary income earner, no family close by)

QUOTE
1. A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes
.
This is a biggie for me - to have an extra 2 hours per day to be with my kids / run my household would be worth a pay cut.  Also I imagine this would also involve a reduction in childcare fees.  

QUOTE
2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.
Also a biggie for me as well - freedom to start early and get home early for school/kinder pickup, school assembly, ballet lessons, cook dinner, etc.  Come in late if there is something on at school.  As I now have one in school and no family to help out, I realise how difficult it is to juggle things around school hours and school holidays, so freedom of working hours is a big deal for me.

QUOTE
3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)
I would consider this a bonus and not a decision making factor.

QUOTE
4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.

Not as much of a deciding factor, but a bonus.  It is handy if needing to get home quickly to pick up kids early if sick etc.  Plus another another half hour saved off your day.

QUOTE
5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)
This would be attractive to me.  I would imagine two buses and a train would take a long time given the potential for timetable delays on each service.

QUOTE
6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.
Again, depends on the age of your kids.  This would be attractive to me if it the opportunity was in say, 5-10 years once my kids were older.  At the moment, I'd be more interested in flexible hours and close to  home.

QUOTE
7. Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option
.
Once again, depends on your family circumstances, but this would be attractive to me.

QUOTE
8. Permanent position vs. contract position
.
This would be attractive to me.


As for a monetary figure on the above, it is difficult to say, as everyone's financial situation is different.  For me, it would depend on my financial commitments and not the actual monetary figure.  If my family could meet it's current financial commitments on the dropped salary, I would take a position with the above conditions in a heartbeat.

#15 MrsLexiK

Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:25 AM

1. A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.
This probably wouldn't bother me, if it was the only difference between the two jobs then I would go the shorter one, but if it was the only downside to the job I wouldn't let it not be the factor I didn't take it.  But I am used to a commute of that time now.

2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.
This would be my number 1 I think.  being able to work more flexi hours with a long commute is fantastic.

3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)
I do like the idea of salary packaging options, and if the only difference was this I would pick the one with the most, but that would probably drop your actual income I would think?  It depends what you use your income for (ie if I went back to work after this baby my income would be covering the food budget, petrol, the gym, any hair and nails etc and then any extra savings we wanted)

4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.
If I had a long commute def on sight parking, also if I was working to 7pm in the winter on some nights (but starting at say 11) I would want a quick walk to my car on those cold wet windy days.

5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)
this probably wouldn't be a thing for me as I would when getting a job regardless of where it is be driving as I cannot stand public transport (more so I cannot stand being crammed in with a bunch of other people) so far in the years I have been working and with a license (so since 18) I have not had a problem with not being able to get to work due to car issues or whatever, there has been the odd time when someone has had to drive me but maybe once or twice (once when my car was being repaired by the smash repair guys opposite where I worked, and I cannot remember if someone drove me when I was sick once and couldn't drive)

6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.
This probably wouldn't bother me so much

7. Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.
This would be a big deal for me

8. Permanent position vs. contract position.
I don't know if I would ever look at a contract position, unless I knew there was only a short time I wanted to work.  

And what if all these perks were offered in the one job? How much of an annual gross salary loss would you be prepared to wear (either in absolute terms e.g. $5,000, $10,000 etc. or as a percentage of your current salary)?

If I had a job which was close to home, onsite free parking, salary scarfice whatever I basically wanted, flexi work hours which I could choose every day (ie work Mon 8-4, Tues 9-5, Wed 11-7, Thur 9-5 and Fri 8-4 and change it up to suit me and my schedule every day), be able to work part time easily, and was perm position I would probably easily drop $10K or even as much as $16 K (I think $16K is the amount that you are able to scarfice regardless? but I am not too sure about the ins and outs) Currently I spend over $100 on petrol a week, and basically $10 a day in tolls so I would assume I would be saving over $7,800 on expenses so a $10K drop in income would only be about $2,200 drop plus I would be able to salary scarfice which I cannot do in my current job. (or should I say I don't have the option to salary scarfice something worthwhile in my current job)

#16 Harmonica

Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:03 AM

Commuting time and potential to go part-time probably the two most important for me.

Commuting time is important, as why would I essentially want to work 2 hours per day unpaid, that is the additional travel time. Also, I want to be accessible for the children if something were to happen at school etc and I needed to get there quickly. That additional time would also impact hugely on being able to sort out getting the kids to after school activiites, sports training etc.

#17 Bluenomi

Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:14 AM


1.  A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.
4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.
5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)

I wouldn't consider these perks because work can't change them. It's only a perk if it is something they can offer you as a bonus. They aren't going to build another bus stop or relocate in order to get you to take a job with them. I'm not saying they aren't important but they wouldn't factor into my salary negotations since it isn't something the company can change and therefore wouldn't compensate you for (well not at least for most people)

2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.
3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)

These wouldn't bother me either way so I wouldn't take a cut in pay to have these options.

7.  Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.
8. Permanent position vs. contract position.

These 2 are the important ones. I'd expect a good 20% salary increase if I was on contract. I probably wouldn't take a job that didn't allow for part time and didn't have decent maternity leave options. 10 years in the public service have spoilt me though.

#18 cinnabubble

Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:15 AM

I think a lot depends on what your partner (if applicable) does. If your partner is close to home/has flexible hours/earns lots of money, that will impact on what you do.

For me, as primary income earner, money has to be the driver (god knows, I wouldn't be at work right now if I didn't have to be). Flexibility is desirable. Commutes are a pretty standard thing in Sydney, so I just expect that.

Edited by cinnabubble, 14 January 2013 - 09:17 AM.


#19 Feral Mozzie

Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:16 AM

I think it depends one few other questions.

How much does your family need the money? Is this the difference between saving for retirement, or living week to week? I would never live week to week, no matter what the perks.

What is the salary? If it was $150k vs $110k, I'd probably be willing to give up a lot more than if it was $38k vs $42k.

but to answer your questions:

1. A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Very important - #1 for me.

2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.

Also high priority.

3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)

You should be able to work out exactly what these are worth to you in $, I would only value the, for what they are worth. Also keep in mind that childcare etc... May be short term.

4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.
Meh, I assume you have factored this in to commute time already.

5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)
Again, assume this is already factored into commute time.

6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.

This would be important to me, but is the advancement only going to get you the salary that the other job starts with?

7. Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.

If you think you may want P-T work down he track I would value this - pt jobs are almost impossible to find.

8. Permanent position vs. contract position.

Depends how much you need job security - for me, I don't really care.

#20 Holidayromp

Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:27 AM

I can comment on the travel time - go for the shorter as you have to add that extra travel time on to your day.
Also I can comment on the public transport.  Please take the easier route.  Public transport is often unreliable and sooooo stressful.  There is nothing worse than waiting for late transport, worrying whether you are going to be on time to pick up kids from childcare etc.  One night DH and I were over three hours late home due to train delays.  

What I am trying to say is the less contact you have public transport the better.  Also you are using three modes of public transport to get anywhere what happens if part of the 'link' is delayed and you miss the connecting form of transport and you cannot make it home or to work on time?  I can count countless times where I have been late to work due to public transport and had to make up time or arriving up to an hour after the daycare centre had closed to pick up DD.  It is not worth the stress.

#21 Jane F. Jetson

Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:29 AM

1. A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.

I've done commutes this long before children, and it wasn't a problem. I kind of enjoy them because it gave me time to daydream or read. However these days I wouldn't willingly choose such a long commute unless my DH were always able to handle school and CC pickup, so I'd choose the 20 minutes.

2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.

To an extent I have this now, and it is great! So it would be somewhat of a priority, again considering what my DH is able to pitch in with - less of a priority if he has flexibility too. One caveat: in practice I've seen some resentment among colleagues in the same company who don't have this choice, so it depends on company culture - does everyone get this, or just mums? Prepare for politics if it's the latter.

3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)

Never had salary packaging so I don't know. From what I've read I'd jump at it, but I'd really need to see the numbers to make a final decision as to net cost/benefit.

4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.

Unless I'm walking through a dangerous area, the walk is fine (good for you).

5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)

I wouldn't touch a job that had this kind of public transport access - or, more realistically, I'd just drive. I actually like taking the train and prefer it, but only one. Interchanging is a recipe for turning up to work late and getting stranded. No thanks.

6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.

I'm ambitious, but again I'd need to see the numbers. Also, is there the possibility of different challenge along the line, or new projects? And realistically, if you do find yourself bored and wanting to advance, you can always consider moving on to a new job. If the salary's worth it, I'd totally consider a no-opportunity job (for now).

7. Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.

Not a huge issue for me.

8. Permanent position vs. contract position.

I wouldn't willingly touch a contract position over a permanent.

#22 WithSprinkles

Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:32 AM


1. A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.


This would definitely would influence my decision. I would not be prepared to take on a job with 2.5 hours travel time per day (unless maybe it paid SIGNIFICANTLY more and therefore enabled me to work a couple of days less!)


2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.

Depending on partner's working situation, this would be helpful when the kids are in primary school (to juggle school pick ups/drop offs) but not so much of a factor while children are young enough to be in daycare. It would definitely be be a high priority if it were a job I would want to stay in long-term (or if I had primary school aged children).

3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)

I guess I would have to work out how much this would be worth (keeping in mind that I don't go to the gym and childcare probably won't be a permanent thing over the years). It would be less of a consideration for me compared to travel time.

4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.


Has this already been factored in to the commute time?

5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)

I would just be looking at the commute time really..whether by car or public transport.

6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.
This would definitely be a consideration.

7. Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.

This would be essential for me.

8. Permanent position vs. contract position.

It would depend on how easy it is to get work in your field I guess.

#23 busymumof1&1/2

Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:35 AM

1. A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.
I just went from a 10 minute commute to a 1.5 hour commute each way. It is rough. Also factor in any childcare drop offs to the commute (do you take the kids with you and have them close to work, or drop them off early and pick up late close to home) I chose to have them close to work, and the commute is brutal with 2 bored, tired and hungry kids, the distraction is immense, especially after a long day, by Friday my car is a warzone.
2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.
This also impacts on the commute. Early start and finish, and you can lose most of the traffic, reducing your commute times.
3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)
This would be a great bonus, and would probably be the most easily quantified, I would work out the savings in $ terms, and not reduce my salary more than that.
4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.
another addition to the commute time
5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)
Do you need to drop off kids? I would use public transport if I was able and it was easy, but not in peak times, and catch up on some ME time, like reading, which I really enjoy, but don't get time for now.
6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.
I would need advancement, but if the rest of the perks were offered and this was the only thing missing, right now I would take it. The rest would make up for it.
7. Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.
I couldn't afford to go part time.
8. Permanent position vs. contract position.
I would take either, contract would need to be more $'s, but I have already got my mortgage, so it would not be that big a drawback.

And what if all these perks were offered in the one job? How much of an annual gross salary loss would you be prepared to wear (either in absolute terms e.g. $5,000, $10,000 etc. or as a percentage of your current salary)?
I could not afford to lose too much salary, but if I could work out the $ savings in petrol, childcare etc, it would be doable to lose maybe 5%


#24 niggles

Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:40 AM

I work for a starting teacher's salary (teeny tiny NFP with a teeny tiny budget) in order to have part time hours, flexible working days and hours and the ability to work from home on occasion (or for a period of time while I'm home with baby). My commute is long (up to an hour each way driving or a little more on public transport). I only get 7 weeks holidays a year. It's a job that I love and has given me the opportunity to develop a wide range of new skills I never would have had the opportunity to do otherwise. Effectively I'm on about $15k less than I would be getting teaching at my current level of experience. I'm very happy with this although it does frustrate me at times.

I don't think all of your issues can be offset with a rise in salary. I think some of them you just need to decide whether you are happy with those conditions or not.

#25 Phascogale

Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:46 AM

1. A commuting time (one way) of 20 minutes versus 1 hour and 15 minutes.

The closer the better.  It does depend on the job and whether you have the opportunity to live closer to work though.  I wouldn't move house to be closer to work (obviously depends on where you live anyway).  I'm currently 10 minutes from work (I've never lived this close timewise - have lives same distance just the speed limits and traffic were different) and I love it.  My job may move (in about 10 years!) and I'll have to drive 20 minutes one way (all fast freeway so no hold ups).

2. Freedom to choose your working hours (between the hours of 7am and 7pm), versus a strict 9-5 day.
Either/Or.  Once again depends on the job.  Hours of 9-5 are good if you have afterschool care (or someone to mind the kids).  But again if you have before school care you can do 7am-3pm so can do either school pick up or drop off.  With school drop off you have more time to catch up with friends or speak to teachers as if you do the drop off, it's quick because you have to keep going.

3. Heaps of salary packaging options (super, childcare, mortgage/rent, credit card, gym membership, etc), versus only a few (super, IT items, parking)
Not really a concern because you have to take everything into account by crunching figures to see which you will be better off with.  In this case I would go with the job that will have the better working conditions for less pay, rather than a company that has a reputation for not being a good working environment because I would be happier which will also translate to a better family life.  Unless I have no choice.

4. On-site parking versus parking about a 15min walk away.
Depends on whether I have the extra 15 minutes to walk.  By this I mean, if I have to drop the kids off to school first - do I have the time to park and walk and not be late for work.  Or how soon I need to pick the kids up from school (less of an issue with after school care as long as I'm not running late for that).  Where I currently work I finish work at 3:30pm.  School  finishes at 3:10pm.  No afterschool care.  Kids go and wait with the kids that catch the bus under teacher supervision.  Last bus leaves at 4:10pm so I'd be cutting it really fine if I had to walk 15 mins to the car.

5. Easy public transport access versus a very convoluted public transport option (two buses and a train)
Depends on the time it would take to take the public transport.  If there is little waiting between the bus/train and there are lots of them ie run every 10 mins so that if you miss a connection you don't have to wait an hour for the next one then not an issue.  If it's going to take me 2 hours to get to work I'd probably not take the job. So easy public transport.

6. A lot of opportunity for advancement down the track, versus little if no opportunity.
If all is equal then opportunity for advancement.  But if the little opportunity is better for my family at the time I'd take that - I can always look for another job with more advancement later.

7. Potential to go part-time down the track versus no possible part-time option.
Part time but depends on what is needed at the time for my family.
8. Permanent position vs. contract position. Permanent but would take the contract if there was nothing else available.




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