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Advanced maternal age


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#1 Catjinks

Posted 11 January 2013 - 03:06 PM

Seeing that on my paperwork made me feel super...that is very very old, and suddenly very very tired. Has sapped out all my energy and vitality and made me think that perhaps this was not a great idea at all to have no. 2 at my advanced years....

#2 feralangel

Posted 11 January 2013 - 03:32 PM

Hi OP,
If you don't mind me asking (for clarification purposes)

How "old" are you?
Are you pregnant? Contemplating pregnancy? The mother of a baby/toddler?
Or is it just something someone said to make you feel this way?

Medically speaking, older mothers are classified as being 35+ (which, relatively speaking, isn't that "old").  They even have a special name for women in this category, "elderly primagravida"!  Now that does make one feel positively geriatric!

Pregnancy/parenthood is tiring at any age.

I am a 44 (nearly 45) year old mother of 2 girls aged 2.5 and 6 months.
Some days are very tiring, especially when compounded by lack of sleep, but it gets easier.

I would be interested to readyour story.

#3 NunSoFeral

Posted 11 January 2013 - 03:47 PM

Picture these words instead:

Incredibly funky, spunky and vital.

Oozing with awareness, self-confidence and energy.

Paperwork and classifications be ****ed - they ahve't got a box big enough to contain us!

#4 I'msoMerry

Posted 11 January 2013 - 03:53 PM

I was 41 when I had DD. I just laughed off the hospital saying they would keep an extra eye on me because of my age.

I appreciated the extra attention. Think about it in a positive way.

#5 kuhla

Posted 11 January 2013 - 03:59 PM

I'm 37 and I thought I'd be in a high risk category.  The OB has made a note of my age but has totally downplayed it.  She says as long as I've never been a smoker, my risks aren't heightened.  

Im happy with that.

#6 RunDMC

Posted 11 January 2013 - 04:01 PM

In the UK they kept referring to my friend as a 'Geriatric Mother' she is 40, she was not impressed.

#7 doubting thomas

Posted 11 January 2013 - 04:10 PM

Yes my gp wrote in my referral to my ob that I was a geriatric mother. My ob laughed

#8 Catjinks

Posted 11 January 2013 - 04:48 PM

Thank you all for the perspective I so desperately needed, and the laughs. I don't know that I could have bounced back from geriatric though....

I am 37 and the mother of a 3.5 year old. I had him at a youthful 33. I've had some pregnancy losses between then and now, and they have weighed on my energy and outlook as well. I am now nearly 13 weeks, so it looks as this one may have stuck. The AMA tag was on my nucal scan docs.

#9 cinnabubble

Posted 11 January 2013 - 04:50 PM

Gosh, I had my second at 40. You're a spring chicken.

#10 Xiola

Posted 11 January 2013 - 04:57 PM

I had my third at 37 and yes there was a lot of talk of my 'advanced maternal age'.....made me feel about 50!

#11 shelbysmum

Posted 11 January 2013 - 05:04 PM

Well I have just had my second, 1 week before my 40th and the midwives at the hospital all said "see you for the next one in 18 months" bless! I had advanced maternal age on my referrals also. I did speak to the midwives about number 3- their response was that there were plenty of women older than me having healthy babies  biggrin.gif

#12 kwiggle

Posted 11 January 2013 - 05:04 PM

Be pleased about the AMA tag - your doctor did you a favour!  In some states the nuchal is subsidised if exactly those words are written on the referral, if not you pay full price.

#13 Catjinks

Posted 11 January 2013 - 05:09 PM

Well my scientifically minded husband did comfort me on two hard miscarriages by complimenting my excellent "quality control", I guess that was my uterus was making those sensible decisions and I need not worry unduly about the yet to get nucal results.

#14 schnookaberg

Posted 11 January 2013 - 05:10 PM

AMA on a nuchal scan request form allows you to get the rebate. Your GP is trying to save you money original.gif

#15 Mumof32b!

Posted 11 January 2013 - 05:21 PM

I had that last year, my OB laughed it off and said it was total nonsense, I was 37 by the way.  Congrats on your pregnancy

#16 Romeo Void

Posted 11 January 2013 - 05:26 PM

I was 40 when I had my first and 42 when my second was born.  I was too tired to care what they were calling me LOL!

#17 Nastyflea

Posted 11 January 2013 - 08:43 PM

Blossom 77, that made me laugh.


I too, was a 'geriatric' mother at 35. Still don't feel almost 40(except first thing in the morning lol).

#18 Beth E

Posted 11 January 2013 - 08:52 PM

I had my first (and only) at 46.  I do feel tired and low on energy quite often, but I think it is understandable as you get older.  I feel more sorry for my DS, I hope I can always keep up with him!

I was aware that I was viewed as being "old" or "geriatric" or all the other terms.  But I was too thrilled and amazed that I was able to get pregnant and keep it, so I didn't care about the words.  All the doctors and medical staff I saw thought it was great.

Yes, it is definitely more difficult than I imagine it would be in your 20's or 30's, but sooo much better in many ways.

Enjoy!!



#19 ~chiquita~

Posted 11 January 2013 - 09:05 PM

....

Edited by ~chiquita~, 12 January 2013 - 07:04 AM.


#20 JustBeige

Posted 11 January 2013 - 09:17 PM

I had that too.  My GP just explained that I would get more attention and probably more ultrasounds.  I was happy with that and happy with the extra attention I got. original.gif



#21 librablonde

Posted 12 January 2013 - 10:47 AM

QUOTE (Catjinks @ 11/01/2013, 05:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I am 37 and the mother of a 3.5 year old.

Good lord, you're only 37! I'm still trying to have my first at the age of 41. Chillax, OP, having babies at 37 is almost the norm now in some areas.


#22 Dresden

Posted 12 January 2013 - 10:52 AM

Oh Joy. I have this to also look forward to, as well has being called some grand multi something or other i'll be called geriatric! The other half being 10.5yrs older than me must be almost pushing up daisies... Will be 37 when I deliver #7.

#23 HRH Countrymel

Posted 12 January 2013 - 10:56 AM

Elderly primigravida is any woman giving birth for the first time over the age of 34.

My Mum said she was somewhat deflated when she noticed 'elderly' on her chart as she sat there in her new mother glow in the 60's!

She noticed rather crossly that they hadn't written it on my sister's chart in the 00's!

#24 ~ky~

Posted 14 January 2013 - 03:11 AM

I was monitored closely due to my "advance maternal age" when I was having my first DD at age 31! Incidentally, I have had less complicated pregnancies at ages 38 and 42 than I did back then  tongue.gif

Edited by ~ky~, 14 January 2013 - 03:12 AM.


#25 My3beauties

Posted 16 January 2013 - 07:06 AM

I never had that on my notes ever. I was 37 when I had my last in Oct last year.
But I did ask my MW as I have read about it on here.
She said that they only tend to use it for first time mums over 35 but it isn't a term they use much there.




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