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15 months old and only 2 words


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#1 MissM86

Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:38 PM

DD is 15 months and only says Mama and Dada and Do for dog. She understands everything really well (even complicated things like 'Turn around and sit down facing that way') and people often comment on how well she understands things. She can clap hands, knows where her head and belly button and feet are and can do things like turn on the tv and so forth. She started walking at 9 months and has reached all the other developmental milestones within the earlyish range but I can't help worrying!



The book I bring to the health nurse for the 18 month check up (the Blue Book) says that at 18 months she should say 5-10 words and I am wondering if she will catch up in the next two months. She babbles a lot but its actually just a lot of Doh Doh Doh and Lalala sounds and up and down intonations.

Do you think this sounds like I should be worried or am I being silly? I don't even know what this would indicate or what I should be worried about in terms of delays etc.

Edited by MissM86, 10 January 2013 - 06:40 PM.


#2 FeralHez

Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:45 PM

My DD is 15 mts and a bit and has only started two words used consistently in context, in the last week or two.

Like yours she understands a LOT.

I am not (yet) worried as she babbles mimicking speech and understands what you say to her.

So I wouldn't be too worried for your DD either, we will probably find they take off really quickly now they are getting started.

#3 OneProudMum

Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:46 PM

It sounds to me like she is developing fine and I bet you will notice a big difference in a month!



#4 Eternally

Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:47 PM

My almost 18 month old is the same, hardly says any words, but is very good at expressing her needs in other ways and understands heaps. She is good at animal noises, says mama and dada, and sings along with sounds, so I'm not worried.

The usual applies though, if you are worried, you can make an appoint,ent with GP or MCHN.

#5 OneProudMum

Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:47 PM

PS you often hear of children who are "late talkers" and then you can't stop them! They are like parrots! You are probably in for a treat.

#6 Brownbear

Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:49 PM

I was also worried when my son only said 2 or 3 words at that age.

About 2 weeks before his 18 month check-up, he had a sudden explosion of words and now (at 19 months) says several hundred words and has started stringing them together.

Your DD sounds fine!

#7 Madnesscraves

Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:54 PM

Wouldn't worry yet. DD is 1 barely says much but understands so many commands. DH was the same and didn't speak until he was like 2-3? It was bc he was so good at featuring what he wanted there was no need to speak! His mum had to basically make him say the word to get what he wanted. Sounds like your child is fine and smart to me!

#8 AntiBourgeoisie

Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:54 PM

Kids usually concentrate on a few developmental goals at a time. If she is physically active and an early walker, it follows that speech might be come later. Even bright kids are generally not 'ahead of the curve' in everything.
Her speech at 15 months sounds within the spectrum of normal. One of my children said his first word at 14 months (while his best friend could say 20), had a couple at 15 months , and by 18 months had probably 100 words and was speaking in 2 word sentences. You may find that your child is quick off the mark at this age.
The reason the speech milestone is set at 18 months (and not earlier) is because there is huge variability before this age. As long as she shows signs of being able to hear, it is unlikely anyone will be too concerned until she is 18 months.
Now that she has a few words, you can encourage acquisition of more words by pointing out and naming everything for her clearly.

#9 Lauren Bell

Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:03 PM

I don't think you have anything to worry about OP! She sounds fine!
I bet she'll pick up heaps of new words over the next 3-4 months. Just keep reading to her :-)
I have a friend who's child was born 1 week before mine, who said her LO was having full on convos by 18 months :-/ but they pick up words so quick, if she's still not talking at 2 years then maybe look into it, but honestly she sounds perfect.

#10 IsolaBella

Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:05 PM

I had two late talkers.

One with less then 10 words at 24m. The other with around 15.

By three my eldest was "I think perhaps a train may be coming soon". By 5 was always asked "does he ever shut up"

In first grade he is reading years ahead and is doing 2-4th grade maths. A very bright spark.

DS2 we discovered at 2.5yrs when he finally talked more that he actually had moderate hearing loss. He had amazing coping abilities so it was not picked up earlier. Even with grommets in at 3 it still took until he was over 4yrs to return a normal hearing test. Al his assessor s talk about how bright he is.

DD didn't have much at 15m, but by 20m was saying Ds1Name give me ball back NOW,

So like PP have said just keep an eye on it and monitor. Also remember sometimes there are words which your child uses which you may not notice are words.



#11 lilmissmars

Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:13 PM

I found with my first that he didn't need to talk because we picked up on his cues the instant he needed things and we did more talking for him.
Now onto my third child and she says quite a bit at 10.5 months because she has more of a need to be heard over the other kids.

Your bub does sound fine. If she is so active and has learnt her gross motor things for the age range you may well find she will turn into a complete chatter box in the next couple of months.

#12 mummy.to.one

Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:36 PM

She is still young but I would keep an eye on it.

She sounds like she has developed fine with other areas, so speech may just be a tad slower.

See how many words she has at 18months and then again at two and decide if she has improved, not moved, or regressed.

DS has a severe speech delay, at 18 months I think he had 5words, this didn't improve by 2years and he was loosing words that he could say at one point.

#13 MissM86

Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:54 PM

Thanks everyone. I will keep an eye on her and see how she goes. I always say the word of whatever object etc it is that she wants, we read MILLIONS of books each day and she has just come back from a holiday with the extended family where everyone spent a lot of one on one time talking to her and her babbling DID increase. She has a dummy in bed and in the car and pram and I am trying to really limit the use of this in case it is having an impact on her too.

#14 ALEJA

Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:44 PM

My 16mo is also very clever in understanding instructions and knows exactly what I am saying yet the majority of his communication is screeches and grunts. We probably have 2 or 3 words happening and I can hear him copying words occasionally but I think he gets a quicker response with the high volume screech. Also a good defence mechanism against older siblings.

#15 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 10 January 2013 - 09:03 PM

My 15 month old makes sounds like mama and dada but I have no idea if he is saying it with intent.

He babbles a lot but doesn't really say anything. He's interactive just can't talk, he understands a lot and can communicate well.

I'm not worried at this stage.

#16 Lucygoosey1

Posted 10 January 2013 - 09:03 PM

My DD2 at 15mths had mum & dada and that's it.  Now at just 17mths she has just had an explosion of words and probably says about 20 or more words - like car, cup, nanny, ba (bath),  and her own name- which she says 1000 times a day.  She talks non stop.
That is completely normal under 18mths.


#17 GreenEgg

Posted 10 January 2013 - 09:15 PM

If she is making lots of different babbling sounds I wouldn't be too concerned my DD babbled a lot and would hold a babbling back and forth conversation but at 18 months did have many words. Not long after she had a word explosion and now doesn't shut up at 2.8months uses the correct pronoun and tense. My DS at 16 months has just been classified as having a speech delay possibly due to fluid In His ears and he doesn't babble but still communicates with pointing and grunting.
Point being I wouldn't be concerned yet but bring it up with health nurse a hearing check wouldn't do any harm.

#18 No girls here

Posted 10 January 2013 - 09:25 PM

I just asked my GP about this last week when DS3 had his 18 month injections as he is only saying 5 words.  The GP said it was still within normal range.  I got a referral to get his hearing tested, but only because I asked for it.  If he hasn't picked up a lot by the time he turns 2 I'll be looking at speech therapy then.


#19 mummabear84

Posted 13 January 2013 - 03:13 PM

Hi,

I'm in the same situation with my 2 year old. He isn't saying many words and I wasn't sure whether this is normal or not. My husband's mother keeps saying that he's fine but I'm still worried.

Even though I think my son understands me reasonably well it seems he should be saying more words at this age. I think I'm going to take him to see a speech pathologist for a check up. I'd rather find out now if he's behind or not so if he is we can get him help early on. If it turns out he's ok, I'll be able to put my mind at ease! Good luck everyone with your little ones - whatever you decide to do I think it's great that you're aware of it and thinking about these things. If you're still not sure after asking your GP, have a look on the web for more info. I found the web site I looked at really informative original.gif

Edited by Therese, 19 February 2013 - 09:47 AM.
to remove blog link


#20 mummy.to.one

Posted 13 January 2013 - 04:14 PM

Mummabear84 have you had his hearing tested?

I know that is a path many take first as it can be the underlying reason for a speech delay.

That guide is useful, as it combines speech and play skills in the list which is all part of speech development.

Another pp mentioned babbling, DS babbles non-stop but still has a severe speech delay as it is only babbling so even with babbling there can still be a delay.



#21 TheSmithFamily

Posted 13 January 2013 - 04:22 PM

Her receptive language sounds spot on and you'll be amazed in the next few months how fast new expressive language will develop!

My 15 month old woke up this morning and pointed out the window and said " look car" I just about fell over as up until then it was mum, dad, brother, more and sissy.

Enjoy xx
Bron

#22 Lil Chickens

Posted 13 January 2013 - 07:37 PM

QUOTE (ALEJA @ 10/01/2013, 09:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My 16mo is also very clever in understanding instructions and knows exactly what I am saying yet the majority of his communication is screeches and grunts. We probably have 2 or 3 words happening and I can hear him copying words occasionally but I think he gets a quicker response with the high volume screech. Also a good defence mechanism against older siblings.


This is 17.5mo DS!  He does understand everything you say to him though.  One day I asked him to "please get Isabelle's bubble blower" and he walked over, got it off the table and gave it to his sister.  I do plan to talk to the GP about it at his 18mo injections.  

It doesn't help that I compare him to DD who was incredibly articulate at this age.




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