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Do you have pets?
feeling guilty :-/


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#1 myhandfull

Posted 10 January 2013 - 04:30 PM

My family and I have an 11mth old puppy. The kids adore her, but boy she is a handful. We've been to obedience classes etc, and she really isn't too bad, just very excitable. She likes to jump and destroy everything in the back yard. We give her bones,  Kong's toys etc, but she still digs, eats the swing set, trampoline and dog kennel.  I was hoping to walk her most days when I'm out wandering with the kids (5 children 9yrs and under), but keeping an eye on my human companions seems to keep me rather busy lol.

Do your family have a pet? How do you manage to fulfil its needs and work it inwith your busy lives.  We are currently renting and we are unable to let her inside.

Tia... guilty pet owner :-/

#2 The Old Feral

Posted 10 January 2013 - 04:49 PM

Well for starters, we chose a young adult rather than a puppy, so she's just a bit older than yours but we just got her recently.  We also deliberately sought out one who was calm and low energy, because we knew what we could cope with.

She's still a bit in her chewy stage so we block off the problem area (washing line in her case!) when we are not there, and when we are home we are vigilant with supervision and teaching her what she can and can't chew.

Ours is so low maintenance it isn't funny, but I've fostered some really mental energetic dogs in the past, and we do these things:

Allowed inside in a crate so they can't run amok.  Train to go straight to their beds and stay there once inside, then you can remove the crate.

I encourage the kids to spend time with them every day.  If they're bored, they get sent out to play with the dogs.  If they nag me to watch TV - out with the dogs. If they're fighting - out with the dogs.  You get the picture!

Unless it's a stinking hot day and they would be left in the car too long, they come with us when we go out.  This helps with socialisation and stops the boredom.  It just becomes part of your routine after awhile.

Either DH or I walk them either first thing in the morning or last thing at  night while the kids are in bed.  Even if it's just a 5 minute spin around the block, it makes a big difference to energy levels.

You sound like you're tempted to chuck it in, OP, in which case you have every reason to feel guilty.  Please remember that a large chunk of that dog's personality and behaviour is a reflection on how she's been brought up, and I really hope you can set a good example for your kids by stepping up and working with her, rather than dumping her because it's all too hard sad.gif.

I'm sure the experts will be in soon with some great advice.

#3 myhandfull

Posted 10 January 2013 - 04:58 PM

Oh no! She's not going anywhere.  The Kids would be very upset.  We just need to try and give her more attention. I know that.  Just needed advice on how to betterinclude her in more family activities, that sort of thing.  Is she too old for a crate inside? I' d be happy to sneak her inside ;-)

#4 Iwantitall

Posted 10 January 2013 - 05:16 PM

No we do not.  There are a few reasons for this, Raising 4 Boys is expensive and time consuming enough, we go away a lot camping and other holidays, we were both working full time till number 4 came along and I will be going back to work 3 days per week next month and the last thing I want to do is have to find time in the day for walking a dog etc and lastly I am a neat freak and dog hair, drool and poop cause a see bit of anxiety!

We may consider a fish or something in the near future but that will be the extent of it.  I do feel guilty sometimes that the boys are missing out but I think it would be extremely irresponsible to get a pet and not be able to care for it properly.

#5 NunSoFeral

Posted 10 January 2013 - 05:31 PM

Yep we have a dog.
I won't say what breed as it tends to unleash hell, but he is now two and just getting over the chew the crap outta everything mode.

We incorporated him into a lifestyle that was pretty active - i like to wear both the kids and the dog out.

We go to the dog parks every other day and the oldest boy and I walk him every morning.
We all play with him - rope toys, balls and frisbee's .

The smaller ones  - 2, 4 and 5 can't really walk him as such, but they play with him and they all take part in the maintenance - poo patrol, brushing, washing.

I'd say start small and build up. Summer is a great time to embark on this.

Perhaps alternate kids and walking him daily.
Get the others included in throwing games and looking after him - checking for ticks also.
Teaching the dog some simple tricks may also improve a bond?
Mine tends to get a bit disdainful over tricks -  I swear he eyerolls me.
Also caught him smirking at me busting some moves when i thought I was alone.




#6 jovana

Posted 10 January 2013 - 05:37 PM

Does the 14yr old cat that sleeps most of the day count as a pet?  biggrin.gif
He's great for us, I don't think we would be able to keep up with a dog. We also have fish tank, it is huge, but it's a once a week, 30 minute clean up job.

#7 password123

Posted 10 January 2013 - 05:45 PM

She is bored. She needs to be walked and played with. If she is on a leash, then I don't see how it can be such a stretch to walk her along with the kids.
I have 2 dogs and they are very much a part of the family.
Please don't let this dog be one of those dogs kept in the backyard and never looked at save for dumping a tin of chum in its bowl. I have seen too many like that and it's sad. Dogs are social creatures, and if their needs are not met, then they relieve their boredom in destructive ways - or become a nuisance with their barking.


#8 The Old Feral

Posted 10 January 2013 - 05:47 PM

Not too old to crate train. Our girl had never been indoors when we got her and was sleeping all night in a closed crate within a few days!  

Spikey has posted a sticky thread with lots of crate training info in the Pets section.



#9 monkeys mum

Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:00 PM

We have snakes two bearded dragons a fish tank two budgies and our new baby a trove week old galah. Reptiles is dps domain as I can't feed them due to allergies dp s also a bit obsessive overvthe fish tank but the kids feed the fish. The galah is my baby well the families but I'm the main one. He's the most time consuming but it's nothing really we give him breakfast when we have breakfast he come out of his cage for a while then goes back in when he's tired. His feeding and cleaning the kids help with and the handling the kids help with but they need supervision the little on gets very over excited by him.



#10 myhandfull

Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:36 PM

She's not one of those dogs.  The Kids play with her daily, DH takes her to work with him a few times a week. I'm not overly confident,  kids and DH are very confident with her. Guess that is the main reason. There is a 'dog beach' near by,  I'll take her there for a little adventure.  I'm guilty because I know I can do more,  hence why I'm asking here in large families,  as other families like mine might have some great suggestions.

Thankyou too for the ones above.

#11 Kalota

Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:49 PM

DF and I are going to adopt a homeless dog from a shelter, so likely it will not be a puppy - puppies are hard work! And some PPs are saying she is bored, but depending on the breed some puppies will just be very active and "naughty" despite given lots of stimulation! May I ask what breed she is? I would just try to continue with the obedience training and do lots to stimulate/tire her out so she isn't as naughty or distracted by things you don't want her to be! The last puppy I raised, I took her for a long walk every single morning and afternoon. A long walk, long enough to tire her out that she would sleep/relax/chill out for most of the day!

(Not from a large family, but an experienced dog owner.)

Good luck, OP!

#12 Mousky

Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:09 PM

Let me start by saying THANK YOU, thank you for being responsible and taking her to obedience.

Secondly, unfortunately some dogs will chew a d there's not a lot you can do about it u til they grow up. Fencing off an area that doesn't contain things you don't want destroyed is an option. You can bung one up yourself and can be removed easily as you are renting.  As a pp said, cratong is great for inside. Use the same techniques you learnt in obedience to make the crate the best thing in the world for your puppy.

Good luck original.gif

- 2 dogs, obedience club members for 3 years, flyball and agility students.
- 3 cats (not obedience club members!)

- 1 central bearded drgon, Mr Stigglesworth.

#13 myhandfull

Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:23 PM

She is an English Staffy. Very affectionate, loving and loyal.  She also enjoys chewing everything in sight.  We have fenced off her kennel area, just so she is not roaming the yard of a night and to also give her some space away from the kids. I actually find when the kids are giggling and loud,  this iswhen she gets a little over excited and rough.  Being small but very strong,  she doesn't quite understand that her behavior is too rough.

I will start a new walking routine with her of a morning.  School will be starting again soon so she can walk to the bus stop and back with me.  20min round trip.

Puppies are hard work,  worth it though.  She is calming down thank goodness.

#14 Mousky

Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:32 PM

Good to hear. Mine finally stopped eating everything in sight at 3.  My other dog has hyperactivity issues, which were still working through @ 3 1/2 years, but he has had a very hard start to life (abused physically and locked in a laundry with no stimulation for his first 5 months).

I hope the new walking regime works original.gif

#15 myhandfull

Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:42 PM

Oh dear Mousky, how terrible for that little puppy :-( I'm certainly going to make a big effort to include our puppy `Shelby' in more of our activities and try the crate idea so she will sit and settle calmly with us of an evening.

Thanks again.

#16 .MrsM.

Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:48 PM

QUOTE (myhandfull @ 10/01/2013, 06:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
She is an English Staffy. Very affectionate, loving and loyal. She also enjoys chewing everything in sight. We have fenced off her kennel area, just so she is not roaming the yard of a night and to also give her some space away from the kids. I actually find when the kids are giggling and loud, this iswhen she gets a little over excited and rough. Being small but very strong, she doesn't quite understand that her behavior is too rough.

I will start a new walking routine with her of a morning. School will be starting again soon so she can walk to the bus stop and back with me. 20min round trip.

Puppies are hard work, worth it though. She is calming down thank goodness.



we have a staffy too, nearly 5 now. they are a wonderful breed! but my god yes, he was hard work in the first couple of years, just like you are describing. he does sleep in at night (im a softy).
the puppy stage is hard work, but he is so well behaved now and gentle with children.
he is everything to us and i can't imagine life without him wub.gif

#17 Fabulous

Posted 11 January 2013 - 08:39 AM

We just have one cat who is low maintenance. The kids have always wanted a dog but with 5 kids I just don't have the time. Plus we go overseas every single year for a holiday so it would be just too difficult.

#18 Peridot

Posted 11 January 2013 - 08:50 AM

We have a Whippet and a fluffy black and white cat, and some fish!

Our whippet is pretty much a third wheel to the kids.. He's so placid and gentle, and pretty much sleeps all day!! Lets himself out the back when he needs the toilet! Our first dog was a golden retriever puppy a year or so ago and omg it was pure hell.. Obedience classes and training etc, but just did not learn not to jump, was full of energy, and I mean full! He got rehoused with the most fantastic older couple (no children) and he has acres of farmland to roam and rivers and lakes to swim in right on his doorstep! We visit him a few times a year and receive updates and photos all the time original.gif

But our little whippet, certainly the best family dog for small children! Amazing!!

#19 ubermum

Posted 11 January 2013 - 08:57 AM

Before selling our house we had two geriatric rottweilers. The last one was put to sleep (multiple age issues, no quality of life) at 13yo when my eldest child was 18mo and my youngest newborn. Since we were planning on selling, we did not replace the dogs. Those two children are both in school this year and there is no dogs. We rent, we both work and we have busy lives. I don't think it's fair to have a dog, particularly a young dog. We have two geriatric cats that I have had since the late 90's. Cats work with our lifestyle and if we are forced to move and rent a different property, there is no way I would want a dog in this tough rental market.

Edited by ubermum, 11 January 2013 - 08:58 AM.


#20 nessrose

Posted 11 January 2013 - 09:44 AM

Yep, we do. We have a Labrador, a cat, 3 chooks and some fish.

I can understand your dilemma about walking with the kids and dog. We have 5 girls, all aged 7 and under and it's hard enough keeping track of them.

DH walks our dog in the morning before work, so that solves that problem for me. Our dog is only 2, but seems to be gradually calming down. He used to be really excitable. He also has part of the yard fenced off for him.

Good luck. Get through the puppy stage and I'm sure you will be fine.

(Actually make that 2 cats. We got another today!)

Edited by nessrose, 13 January 2013 - 02:47 PM.


#21 Mama8

Posted 11 January 2013 - 12:58 PM

More pets than kids ohmy.gif
2 dogs p, a 2 yr old Bullarab named Jed and a 1 yr old Staffordshire bull terrier named Blaze.
2 cats
4 rabbits
8 chickens
10 ducks
2 snakes
2 water dragons
2 blue tongue lizards

#22 Kalota

Posted 11 January 2013 - 01:04 PM

QUOTE (myhandfull @ 10/01/2013, 09:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
She is an English Staffy. Very affectionate, loving and loyal.  She also enjoys chewing everything in sight.  We have fenced off her kennel area, just so she is not roaming the yard of a night and to also give her some space away from the kids. I actually find when the kids are giggling and loud,  this iswhen she gets a little over excited and rough.  Being small but very strong,  she doesn't quite understand that her behavior is too rough.

I will start a new walking routine with her of a morning.  School will be starting again soon so she can walk to the bus stop and back with me.  20min round trip.

Puppies are hard work,  worth it though.  She is calming down thank goodness.


Good to hear! I have always found the morning walking routine very helpful with keeping puppies calm during the day, because they're usually tired and worn out from their walk! I'd usually do at least a 45 minute walk in the morning though, if you have time! 20 minutes is probably not enough to tire out an energetic English staffy! I used to get up at 5.30am daily to talk my australian silky terrier puppy for a 45min walk and it really helped calm her down! Then we'd do the same walk in the afternoon:-)

#23 againagain

Posted 11 January 2013 - 01:21 PM

We have a lot of pets, 2 dogs, a few guinea pigs, chickens, two large bird aviaries, some smaller large flights with birds.....I would get more if I could.

However these are more for me than the kids, I enjoy looking after them and cleaning them, walking the dogs etc.

We had a very old active dog when we had kids, sadly he has since passed away but we got small, less active, lower coat maintenance dogs when we felt the time was right. I can't imagine my life without a dog, but we chose extremely carefully to ensure the dogs we got would fit with our lifestyle (and fit in the car with all our kids!).

#24 Guest_~Karla~_*

Posted 11 January 2013 - 02:13 PM

4 kids (1 with aspergers and anxiety, 2 with autism and loads of medical issues). Oldest is 6.
2 cats that we have had since before kids (we had 3, but one died 4 years ago).
A tropical fish tank (down to 2 fish).
And a new Labrador puppy. original.gif

I do obedience training with the puppy in the backyard while the kids are bouncing on the tramp, riding their bikes etc. It's great because she's learning to listen to me rather than chase them, she gets attention and training and the kids get to play too. ETA - I also do training with her inside when the kids are calm and watching TV or something. She's too young to go walking on the streets or go to dog parks just yet, but once she's fully vaccinated I will be taking her for a walk/swim every day after school/kindy drop off and DH and DS1 will take her for another walk in the evenings while I put the other boys to bed.

Edited by ~Karla~, 11 January 2013 - 02:17 PM.


#25 Mum2TwoDSs

Posted 11 January 2013 - 02:26 PM

We have a golden retriever and 6 goldfish. We had our dog first and intend to take good care of him for the rest of his life. after that we wont be having a dog for a long time. DS1 is asking for a cat or a bunny for his next birthday, no he's not getting any. DS1 is 7 and we have a newborn. It's a lot of work.

Puppies are a lot of work...they are full of energy just like kids. When ours was puppy stage all hell broke loose when we went out. He's was always in house cos we used to live in an apartment. When we came home, paper (my work on the shelf) was everywhere, cotton from ripped pillow we gave him was all over the place and our day curtains got ripped down. We learnt many lessons from a little puppy. Training is extremely important.

Now that he is almost 10, we still get messes from him on a thundery day...he would rip floor mats and shred up his bedding but he definitely has mellowed over the years. He is still indoors cos I just can't bear leaving this furry baby outside on his own. I feel miserable on his behalf.

I clean the floor every day as he sheds a lot. Feeding is done by either DH or DS1. We walk him 2-3 times a week but he gets to play in the garden twice or thrice each day.

You know what? Sometimes the thought of getting a treadmill hangs in my head. It will be good to get rid of some of that energy. Tounge1.gif

Edited by Mum2TwoDSs, 11 January 2013 - 02:33 PM.





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