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Homemade snacks for school
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#1 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 10 January 2013 - 12:44 PM

So, DD1 starts school soon and I was planning on making a few homemade snacks to help fill the lunch box.  But apart from basic biscuits (plain, jam drops, freckles), I have no idea.

Her lunchbox will always have some fruit as well as a salad/sandwich, but I also thought a non-fruit snack might be nice occasionally.

Do you make homemade snacks for your school-aged kids to include in their lunch box?  If so, what?



#2 AntiBourgeoisie

Posted 10 January 2013 - 12:48 PM

You should find out if your school has a healthy eating policy. Biscuits (unless savoury) are not allowed at many schools.

#3 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:03 PM

QUOTE (AntiBourgeoisie @ 10/01/2013, 12:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You should find out if your school has a healthy eating policy. Biscuits (unless savoury) are not allowed at many schools.

didn't know this.  Will check with school.  Do they call the police or something?

Edited by YodaTheWrinkledOne, 10 January 2013 - 01:03 PM.


#4 BetteBoop

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:08 PM

QUOTE (YodaTheWrinkledOne @ 10/01/2013, 01:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
didn't know this.  Will check with school.  Do they call the police or something?


Yes, but only if the unhealthy food isn't purchased from their tuckshop. Because then it's fine  wink.gif

My favourites are banana cake, apple muffins and anzac biscuits. I make them all healthier than the traditional recipes though.

I substitute white flour for wholemeal flour. I also substitute every 60gm of butter for 1 egg.

#5 Holidayromp

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:09 PM

QUOTE (YodaTheWrinkledOne @ 10/01/2013, 02:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
didn't know this.  Will check with school.  Do they call the police or something?


Apparently they do  tongue.gif .  
Also if the school tried to tell me what I could or couldn't pack in my child's lunchbox I would tell them what for.  Treats in moderation is good....
But don't get me started on what an over zealous teacher did with the kids's lunchboxes in her classroom and then what DH and I did to her  rant.gif


#6 CountryFeral

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:13 PM

Mini muffins!


My nephews love sushi in theirs too.

#7 polka dotty

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:13 PM

Muffins - blueberry, banana, apple, choc chip, etc
Banana bread
Pikelets
Biscuits
Pizza Scrolls (puff pastry, pizza sauce, mozarella cheese)

I usually stick to these kinds of things, make in bulk & freeze (I have 3 kids to feed).

I can't send anything sweet to kindy because I get in trouble...I once queried what was wrong with my homemade blueberry muffins and they told me the staff don't have time to check what's homemade or from the shops, so there's a blanket ban on cakes, muffins, sweet biscuits, etc

#8 Guest_CaptainOblivious_*

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:14 PM

QUOTE (BetteBoop @ 10/01/2013, 02:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yes, but only if the unhealthy food isn't purchased from their tuckshop. Because then it's fine  wink.gif

rofl... that is so true for our school. We have things in the newsletter each week banning lollies, specifically those sold at the shop across the road, but then the canteen pricelist attached with... LOLLIES!

I normally make muffins, cupcakes, zucchini slice and pizza scrolls (using a bread dough). I just freeze big batches then put one in the lunchbox at a time. DD1 doesn't eat sandwiches so I also make salads, sometimes with tuna, veggie sticks and dip, chopped up fruit etc.

#9 FeralBob!

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:17 PM

Berry and white chocolate muffins are a hit with DD. She gets them on average once a week, with cheese and crackers on the other days.

#10 Feral timtam

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:20 PM

QUOTE (YodaTheWrinkledOne @ 10/01/2013, 01:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
didn't know this.  Will check with school.  Do they call the police or something?


No, some schools confiscate the lunch instead sad.gif
The school my younger brother did grade 7 was one of these, they didn't offer a healthy alternative to make sure the child had food in their tummy either.
I'd personally rather see a child with a stomach full of junk food than a child with an empty stomach personally, but there are people who think starving the child will force them to eat 'healthy'. Some of these people have really crazy ideas of what healthy food is too.

The latest Coles magazine has some tasty looking lunch box stuffers, it might be worth picking one of those up when you do your shop. It's a free mag so it doesn't hurt to have a look.

#11 AntiBourgeoisie

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:21 PM

QUOTE (YodaTheWrinkledOne @ 10/01/2013, 02:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
didn't know this.  Will check with school.  Do they call the police or something?

LOL, honestly I have no idea. SIL was complaining recently as my eldest niece is starting prep in a few weeks and her school has sent out quite detailed info.

QUOTE (Holidayromp @ 10/01/2013, 02:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Treats in moderation is good....


I agree. But your kids are in school for such a short part of the day. Why not save the treats for when they are at home? Personally, I don't see a huge issue with not having a treat for 7.5 hours?

I think it's much easier to enforce a blanket 'ban' than 'the odd lolly is ok'. And unfortunately, for some parents, a 'treat' is a single home made cookie, for another it's a jumbo mars bar. And I DO think the school is allowed to say they don't want kids consuming jumbo mars bars before returning to sit in a classroom...



#12 Feral Borgia

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:21 PM

QUOTE (CaptainOblivious @ 10/01/2013, 02:14 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
rofl... that is so true for our school. We have things in the newsletter each week banning lollies, specifically those sold at the shop across the road, but then the canteen pricelist attached with... LOLLIES!

I normally make muffins, cupcakes, zucchini slice and pizza scrolls (using a bread dough). I just freeze big batches then put one in the lunchbox at a time. DD1 doesn't eat sandwiches so I also make salads, sometimes with tuna, veggie sticks and dip, chopped up fruit etc.

Same! We get constant reminders about the healthy food policy....DS kept pestering me for a "pineapple cup" from the canteen....I (stupidly) thought it would be a little plastic cup of freshly cut up pineapple, so I thought, well ok why not.....but noooooo.....I saw a kid with one and suffice to say I don't think there's anything in it remotely resembling a pineapple!

#13 Leggy

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:22 PM

QUOTE
But don't get me started on what an over zealous teacher did with the kids's lunchboxes in her classroom and then what DH and I did to her


Oh come on, you can't leave us hanging like that!

DN starts prep this year so I am scouting for ideas too. She decided a while ago that anything fritatta-y was "horrible! yuck! blergh!" (we may have made the mistake of reading some Calvin and Hobbes cartoons to her) but I'll have to try those on her again. Maybe made in patty cake cases.

Other than that:
little savory muffins
veg sticks or kebabs with a little container of dip
biscuits or slices

Pizza scrolls - I'll have to try that. Perhaps herb scrolls too (same deal, but chop up a bunch of herbs finely and either incorporate into the dough or mix with some oil or tomato paste to spread on top.)

#14 DreamFeralisations

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:26 PM

Hommous and carrot sticks were favourites here, as was "trail mix" - sultanas, apple, sunflower seeds and dry popcorn.

Our tuckshops up here have far more stringent guidelines, obviously.  Any cake made in our tuckshop had to have very limited fats and sugars in them.

#15 Guest_CaptainOblivious_*

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:28 PM

QUOTE (Lucretia Borgia @ 10/01/2013, 02:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Same! We get constant reminders about the healthy food policy....DS kept pestering me for a "pineapple cup" from the canteen....I (stupidly) thought it would be a little plastic cup of freshly cut up pineapple, so I thought, well ok why not.....but noooooo.....I saw a kid with one and suffice to say I don't think there's anything in it remotely resembling a pineapple!

yeah, ours has ice creams, slushies, lollies, pies, pizzas, dino nuggets but the REAL problem is clearly the parents who are sending a homemade muffin with their kids. *facepalm*  It really does do my head in.


#16 Rosie R

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:32 PM

Gee's I wish our local Primary school had some kind of restrictions for what kids could bring to school other than the obvious (e.g. for kids in their class that are anaphylactic) because kids share what they bring to school and although my SD and SS don't have anaphylaxis they don't cope well after eating products with artificial preservatives, colours and additives....anyway to answer your question,
I've started making mini muffins as a bit of a treat, I made banana and chocolate ones last time. The kids love them. Also around christmas I made lemon balls (substituted lemon for the usual chocolate) and the kids seemed to think they were ok too.  I guess it's a bit like making a lemon slice but
it's got sweetened condensed milk in it instead of butter.

#17 *LucyE*

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:47 PM

I agree. But your kids are in school for such a short part of the day. Why not save the treats for when they are at home? Personally, I don't see a huge issue with not having a treat for 7.5 hours?
Because the hours my kids are at school are also the hours they are awake and active, therefore better able to expend all the energy they are consuming. It makes more sense to me, to let them have a sweet muffin at morning or afternoon tea rather than at breakfast or just before dinner.

OP I do bulk baking in the holidays and freeze in individual portions. Then it is easy to mix and choose different lunch box fillers with minimal fuss during the week.

#18 RogerRabbit

Posted 10 January 2013 - 02:00 PM

Banana or apple muffins
Cheese and Vegimite scrolls
A saltana slice
piklets


I have made muslie bars but DS1 found them too chewy or cruncy

#19 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 10 January 2013 - 02:44 PM

QUOTE (AntiBourgeoisie @ 10/01/2013, 01:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I agree. But your kids are in school for such a short part of the day. Why not save the treats for when they are at home? Personally, I don't see a huge issue with not having a treat for 7.5 hours?

DD1 will be at before-school care around 8am and will be picked up around 5:30-6:00pm from after-school care.  I'd rather she have her snack a while before she tucks into her dinner when she gets home.  Some days, the snacks will be "treat food" but not all of the time.

Thank you for the suggestions everyone.  Loving them - am making my list to put on the fridge.

And thanks tamjk - I'll pick up the  latest Coles magazine tomorrow when I'm out and about.




#20 muggins_00

Posted 10 January 2013 - 03:22 PM

I do mini cupcakes (no icing)
Muffins - fruit or savoury
In winter pumpkin, bacon and cheese scones are popular
Zucchini slice
Cheese and vegemite scrolls
Pizza scrolls
Mini cookies
Apple pikelets (just grated apple mixed into the batter)
Veggie pikelets (grated veggies mixed into the batter)


I make a few different options, freeze in individual portions and get DS1 to pick what he wants out of the box, then I just have to add the fresh bits and pieces.

At the start of last year the kinder teachers vetoed my homebaked goodies. But then I did kinder duty and saw kids with packets of chips, TimTams etc and then I didn't give a damn. Plus they recommend the kiddy yoghurts, I can guarantee there would be more sugar in one of those than there would be in one of my homemade fruit muffins.

Edited by muggins_00, 10 January 2013 - 03:26 PM.


#21 monkeys mum

Posted 10 January 2013 - 03:39 PM

I had a go at our kindy one day as ds came home from after school care in tears as the kindy had taken his lunch. I politely informed them that if they did it again i would take my complaint much higher. Ds then thought he wasnt allowed to eat at kindy, it took a lil while for their one act of stupidity to be fixed for ds. Now they dont bother trying to send lunch back home or sending a note home, my kids dont have junk food they have homemade goodies that are healthy.

I make pizza or cheesy mite scrollsvwith a home made dough. Egg baskets, savoury muffins like pizza, vegetable combo, cheese and chives.

Dd is picky so i need to find some other recipes for snacks that she will like.

The youngest loves pasta either bake or his pasta cheesy salad for kindy lunch.

#22 tkenhrb

Posted 10 January 2013 - 03:53 PM



rice paper rolls
baby cucumbers and cherry tomatos with cheese
mini quiches
cold hone chicken wings
2 min noodles with peas corn and carrot

#23 i-candi

Posted 10 January 2013 - 04:05 PM

quiche
DS would take dips with bread sticks and veggies rather than sandwiches
DD would eat cold chicken and salad


In winter get a thermos and they can have left over dinner like pasta and soup. DD did find it hard to open due to the vacuum and a lot teachers refuse to help a child open their lunch. I worked at the school so she would come find me, in the end I got huffy at staff not helping her so I took her lunch and heat it in the microwave and we met at the back of the staff room. I'm transferring school so can't do that anymore sad.gif




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