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#1 CupcakeSweety

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:31 AM

I know people are going to tell me to stop being a precious wrapping child in bubble-wrap parent or pay-up but I will ask anyway.
My 7 year old DD is about to start year 3 and is no longer eligible for free school transport. We only just miss out on being far enough away from school to qualify.
She now has to walk up to 2.3km to school or pay to go on the bus.
Do you think this is a reasonable distance for a child this age to be expected to walk alone?
I am not at all against children walking to school but this seems like a long way.

#2 twinboys

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:33 AM

Why not do some test walks with a backpack/school bag on her and see how long it takes and what roads have to be crossed and how/where they should be crossed?

Maybe she can walk to school and bus it home?

#3 *bibs*

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:34 AM

Way, way too far to walk at this age.....never.

Edited by *bibs*, 07 January 2013 - 12:40 PM.


#4 BadCat

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:36 AM

I wouldn't let a 7yo walk that far alone.  I know people who would be fine with it though.

#5 Beancat

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:40 AM

Can she ride a bike to school?  I used to ride about that far from grade 3.  i guess it depends what the roads are like where you live.  Also, it might be a bit far to walk/ride in summer and the middle of winter.  Can you not drive her?


#6 mum850

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:40 AM

I would try the walk to school and bus it home option to start with anyway.


#7 fillesetjumeaux

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:40 AM

My DD2 is about to go into year 3, and while she qualifies for free travel (school is exactly 3km away), she will be walking some mornings.  The route is reasonably suburban, only two main roads to cross, and they're only a lane each way with a crossing (one manned, one not).

DD1 (just finished year 4) and her friend started walking it in 2012, and they do it in half an hour.  We recently walked 2/3 of the route and back home again (so 4km instead of 3km) and DD2 did it without a problem.

Of course, she will be walking it with at least 2 other (older) girls, if not up to 9 or 10 children altogether.  I would not be happy for her to do it alone at this point.

#8 TillyTake2

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:49 AM

How far can you be away from school before you aren't eligible (in nsw?) How much does the bus cost?

#9 Autumnal

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:50 AM

Never! Their are way too many crazies out there.

#10 Frockme

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:50 AM

Can you drop her to school instead? Ride bikes?

Eta - I think it's too far to walk on her own. With you carrying a back pack, maybe ok, bus it in the rain and extreme heat.

Edited by Malaya, 07 January 2013 - 11:52 AM.


#11 bikingbubs

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:53 AM

I think it is too far to walk alone.  On a bike, maybe...

#12 Nasty Fr0g

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:54 AM

7 entering year 3, im guessing she would be nearly 8...? Would you walk with her, OP?

If not, it's further than I would be comfortable with.

#13 Elizabethandfriend

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:55 AM

Far too far on her own, in my view.

#14 baddmammajamma

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:55 AM

If at all possible, I'd be trying to find a way to cover the bus fare. That sounds like a long distance for a young child.

If you are unable to drop her at school yourself or cover the bus fares, could you arrange a carpool with some other families?

#15 fillesetjumeaux

Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:02 PM

There are not as many crazies out there as the mass media would like us to think wink.gif

You must be at least 2.6km from the school to qualify for subsidised travel after Year 2 in NSW.

ETA: I was wrong - see post #30 for correct info wink.gif

Edited by fillesetjumeaux, 07 January 2013 - 12:41 PM.


#16 SMforshort

Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:06 PM

QUOTE (fillesetjumeaux @ 07/01/2013, 01:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
There are not as many crazies out there as the mass media would like us to think wink.gif

You must be at least 2.6km from the school to qualify for subsidised travel after Year 2 in NSW.



Do you know what the distance to qualify for travel in year 7 in NSW is?  And whether that distance is via the shortest possible route or as the crow flies?

#17 Therese

Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:08 PM

For me, I think it is a little too far while she is still so young.



#18 liveworkplay

Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:11 PM

How much is the bus? It costs our kids $1.04 (Greencard) per trip regardless of the distance travelled. 3Km is a long way for a kid. We lived 3 km from the nearest bus stop growing up and my parents always drove us as, even as teens it was a long trek with a school bag.

#19 HRH Countrymel

Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:12 PM

On your own it is a bit far.  With others to walk with it isn't.



#20 FeralLIfeHacker

Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:14 PM

I wouldn't let my 7 yr old walk that far.

#21 wilson99

Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:15 PM

Why not let her ride her bike?

#22 ~sydblue~

Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:21 PM

We(DD8yrs & I) walk about 25mt to the bus stop to go to school and she walks the 25mt home while I watch from the mail box.
DD13 walks about 15-20mins to school depending on her mood and whether or not her father is running late and willing to drop her off. For some reason she has the boys at school thinking she is helpless, so a couple usually meet her at the corner of our street and walk with her.

Edited by ~sydblue~, 07 January 2013 - 12:21 PM.


#23 mrsmuffintop

Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:22 PM

A kid that age could easily do it on a bike. My 10 year old rides 5km each way to her primary school at the moment. She goes with a friend, they really enjoy the ride and it has built her confidence, as well as getting exercise. DH did it with her a few times before she set off on her own, so we could feel confident that she could ride safely. We also gave her a cheap mobile phone so she could call us in an emergency.

#24 Walkers

Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:26 PM

At 7 I wouldn't let any of my kids ride a bike or walk to school alone. I'd be worried about road safety at that age more than anything else. Walking with a group would be different, although there & back each day is quite a distance for a little person.

#25 CupcakeSweety

Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:32 PM

I am able to either drive her or afford to pay for the bus. I would imagine many people may not be in this position though e.g. don't drive/no car or large family=lots of fares to pay. Its more of a "Do you think the system is fair" question.
My DD will not be walking as I do not consider the route safe. There are busy roads with poor visibility of oncoming cars due to bends and hills with no crossings, a number of places where there is no clear footpath e.g. trees/undergrowth extending to the road but mostly I think it is just to far.
I think school travel should be covered for primary school or perhaps the distance from school reduced.




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