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Do geeks produce geeks?
Share your geek-kids!


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#1 Liv_DrSperm_sh

Posted 03 January 2013 - 10:30 AM

DH and I are the biggest scifi watching - fantasy loving geeks! For example both he and I read Lord of the Rings when we were 10 and recently had a 2 hour debate about who would win in a firefight - the Enterprize or an Imperial Star destroyer.

I have to admit to trying my absolute hardest to indoctrinate my kids into geekdom...they got a millenium falcon for christmas this year and their favourite show is clone wars - which we decided was a good gateway program into full sci-fi fantasy.

So last night I had three of my proudest geek-mum moments -

DD was looking at the Hobbit movie companion book she got for Christmas and could name ALL the dwarves!

A little while later DH was playing with a transformer with her and said - "DD, how fast can you transform this transformer"...DD replied "it's not a transformer it's an Autobot" and then proceeded to transform it in less time than it would take me to pull some things and get frustrated and go and find some wine!

DS - who has previously shown a penchant for scifi and loves starwars - sidled up to me, leaned in close, and in a throaty voice whispered..."My preeeccciiooouuussss"

Join me in a Geek-tacular!

#2 GamerMum

Posted 03 January 2013 - 10:38 AM

Oh I hope it rubs off on DD! DF and I are complete and utter nerds.

DD's too little to choose what she's into yet, but I did buy her a "Geek in Training" T-Shirt and two "Geelking" onsies for Christmas. Tounge1.gif

#3 HRH Countrymel

Posted 03 January 2013 - 10:52 AM

I hope so!

I have managed to subtly exert my influence on my nephews so far.... I had two moments of unabashed joy when I was staying with them last.

1) when my smallest nephew asked if I wanted him to read to me (as a reluctant reader this caused thinly veiled delight to his parents and I) out he toddled with his STAR WARS READERS!!  - my favourite was 'Han and Chewie - friends forever'!  "I KNEW you'd like them Auntie Countrymel!"

2) older nephew struggling with a rubix cube he had bought at the school fair. "Auntie Countrymel, how fast can Uncle DP do a cube in?"  my BIL looks up "Why did you ask that? Do you think Uncle DP the smartest person you know?" (slight tone of jealousy in his voice)
"Ummmmm..... " and sweet nephew quickly changes subject!


*for the record DP is a software architect/programmer - patterns are his 'thing' my nephew was right on the money, DP IS good at things like that - and kudos for noticing I thought!

#4 Isolabella

Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:02 AM

My boys took until 5 & 7 to be really Star Wars. The Lego Padawan menace and empire strikes out were good starters for them. They then happily watched all 6star wars films.

Jabba the Hutts palace and millennium Falcon were the best Christmas presents. dS1 still upset he did not get the big AT AT walker or Death Star.

Sorry, neither DH or I were Hobbits LOTR fans.

Countrymel love the nephews.

DS2 is showing a great thing for patterns and puzzles. I am very proud.

#5 MintyBiscuit

Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:07 AM

I'm assuming part of it is genetic. DH is already trying to get DS listening to Weird Al, and we've had discussions on when he can start watching Monty Python.

This is also very important

#6 poss71

Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:20 AM

I don't know, but I'm sure hoping nerds produce nerds. I'm a nerd, with a geek DH, who loves all sorts of boring geek things lol.

Mum was with the girls yesterday and DD2 (nearly 4) chatted to her about monotremes, having misheard a radio safety announcement about 'monitoring'.

They also love playing Dumb Ways to Die, Cab Calloway's Minnie the Moocher and the Muppets' Mahna Mahna song on YouTube. Eclectic.

DH has taught them the appropriate response to "One day, lad, all this will be yours."

All in all, a good start I think... original.gif

#7 Isolabella

Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:23 AM

HOO my kids were kept pure and their faces at "I am you father" were priceless.



#8 Sunny003

Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:28 AM

I'm so totally a non geek. DH is a geek. Two kids and counting are semi geeks. It's star wars, clone wars, superheroes everything here.

I've Learnt to nod & smile and pretend I know who Captain Rex is hahahahaa

#9 i-candi

Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:31 AM

DH is a geek, he builds his own computers and they are always being changed. Currently he has  water cooled with clear side panel and lights inside with whatever parts I'm not sure lol. He has three monitors with a special stand he bought to hold all three, it took him ages to line them up perfectly.

DS gets the 'hand me down parts', he also has a water cooled computer with clear side panel and his tower is like some sort of army colour/design. For Christmas DH put a Geforce GTX690 graphics card in DS computer !!! it was a kind of hand me down  huh.gif  

When we went to the USA we bought DS a t-shirt that says 'talk nerdy to me'. DS and DH read so much on the internet and come up with the strangest facts and weaves them into normal sentences.

DD has not inherited the geek/nerdyness - lol she just cracked her iPod screen while outside on her scooter, she is rarely on the computer. She however kick a*se on stage with whatever she does - oracy, poetry recital, singing and dancing lol



#10 Sif

Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:35 AM

Yeah, we're an entire family of geeks here - our brands are Doctor Who - first and foremost (my youngest can recite and reenacts entire episodes), Star Trek (old and new), Star Wars, LOTR (haven't had the finances to see The Hobbit, but DS13 took it upon himself to read the book last year). Minecraft (not Dh or youngest, but the other three and myself), and the list just goes on and on...

I got it from my parents. My mum carried a Star Trek passport in her purse for many years (and I lived in fear she would be hit by a bus and people would search her handbag for ID), and then the other day I found this book amongst the library of books she's currently storing at my house...



I definitely think it's an inheritable trait...

Edited by Sif, 03 January 2013 - 11:37 AM.


#11 CupOfCoffee

Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:52 AM

I am a dork, my husband in a geek...

We have produced a geek preschooler.  

This was her ood drawing when she had just turned three:







#12 findingada

Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:55 AM

We are a family of geeks with nerd tendencies. One of my boys told someone using an iphone that Android phones are better because "Mummy can write her own programs for it". Classic moment though was when we were visiting someone who was complaining they were having problems with their computer and one of my boys said "Have you tried turning it off and on again?" (sadly not said with reference to the official guidelines documented here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn2FB1P_Mn8). I am also in the process of indoctrinating them about the Linux Way and I look forward to the day when we can have a Vi versus any-other-text-editor debate. We check the NASA site regularly and the models my boys have built of Curiosity out of K'nex recently showed they picked up some interesting details of its design (Grandad to grandchild "What's that? Is it a gun?". Grandchild to grandad: "No Grandad! It's an antenna to transmit data back to Earth."). The youngest still turns the computer off at the power point though so I don't hold much hope for him.

Edited by motherwrites, 03 January 2013 - 12:09 PM.


#13 Sif

Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:02 PM

QUOTE
The youngest still turns the computer off at the power point though so I don't hold much hope for him.


Rofl!

There has been a bit of technology explosion in our house in the past 18 months, but before that we had no games consoles, no iPods and only very basic computers (they're still basic but now we have both PC and Mac), and yet, in the past 6 years of primary school, my older boys have always been the IT go-to kids at school, and score above average in IT on their report cards. That just because we talk about technology a lot and they hear it all the time and have picked up how things work by osmosis.

#14 BadCat

Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:10 PM

Of course geeks beget geeks.  It's in the bible right after "thou shalt not covet the precious".

#15 Tesseract

Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:13 PM

DH is a geek and I'm a nerd with geek tendencies. DH's favourite onesie of DD's was the one that said "Level 1 Human, -3 bank" or something to that effect.

We are hoping to raise geek kids, I'm not sure how we would cope if they were cool.

Just a question for other geek families out there, if you don't mind me hijacking. How do you all handle balancing screen time with your (and the kids) love of geek media? Let's face it, a lot of geekdom is to do with movies, tv, computer games, Internet. I love it all but don't think kids should be spending lots of screen time, particularly at a young age...For example DH wants to introduce DD (2 years) to Doctor Who ASAP but I'm worried it's too scary and she's too young for tv...Bit of a geek dilemma!

#16 Liv_DrSperm_sh

Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:17 PM

QUOTE (motherwrites @ 03/01/2013, 12:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
"Have you tried turning it off and on again?" (sadly not said with reference to the official guidelines documented here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn2FB1P_Mn8).


He he....I taught DS to say "have you turned it off and then on again...is it plugged in" complete with an irish accent!

I love the young mind, so easy to mould!

#17 Liv_DrSperm_sh

Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:23 PM

QUOTE (Tesseract @ 03/01/2013, 01:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
DH is a geek and I'm a nerd with geek tendencies. DH's favourite onesie of DD's was the one that said "Level 1 Human, -3 bank" or something to that effect.

We are hoping to raise geek kids, I'm not sure how we would cope if they were cool.

Just a question for other geek families out there, if you don't mind me hijacking. How do you all handle balancing screen time with your (and the kids) love of geek media? Let's face it, a lot of geekdom is to do with movies, tv, computer games, Internet. I love it all but don't think kids should be spending lots of screen time, particularly at a young age...For example DH wants to introduce DD (2 years) to Doctor Who ASAP but I'm worried it's too scary and she's too young for tv...Bit of a geek dilemma!


I'm probably the wrong person to ask this of...my family reacted in horror when they found out that the twins had watched all three LOTR movies. In my defence, they will be 4 in April, I watched it with them and they thought it was awesome....DS runs around pretending to fight orcs and DD thinks she is Sam.

We balance it by lots of outdoor play too. I am a geek, but I also like being in the sunshine - weird I know given that sun is an anathema to geekiness! I also really like sport, so hopefully I'll give them a balance of geek/sport/sun. I'm planning on getting them into surf nippers as soon as they can hold their heads out of water.

My DH is a gamer however and is not allowed, under any circumstance, to get them into RPGs....so many daylight hours are spent on his stupid computer!

#18 findingada

Posted 03 January 2013 - 01:36 PM

I do a mix of consequences and firm guidance on restricting screen time. I didn't start any screen time until the twins were 3 years old. When they started, I restricted time but started to build a foundation of why I restricting the time (whether or not they understood). It was particularly helpful if they were very grumpy after interfacing with a device because I would link their behaviour to watching/playing for too long in front of a screen. Generally, I remind them that our bodies like to move and to not stay inside for too long and suggest that that is why they might be feeling grumpy after extended screen time. If they regulate screen time to what I think is a reasonable balance, I talk about how their behaviour is different when they stop after they have had enough. I talk about how it is great that they now have time to do other things they enjoy (and list things they currently enjoy doing away from the screen).

In the background, I also draw a focus on activities that create. If it is an activity that creates something new, then I am less restrictive but if it does not, then I tend I assess based on what else has happened that day. If they have had a busy day (spent lots of time outside, have been interacting face-to-face with people, have been creating and/or learning something new), then I leave them to it for a bit longer to see if they will self-regulate. It's kind of like how we talk about food: we can't eat the same thing day and and day out and be healthy so how we use our bodies is similar and we should also do varied things to keep ourselves healthy physically and mentally.

We all also practice the approach that "screen time should not stop us progressing with the things we need to do".  I mainly talk out aloud about my self-regulation process with respect to this (because I need to be careful too). So I guess I have decided to help teach them to self-regulate based on how they feel but I have also talked to them about consequences down the track - DH has problems with his hands related to keyboard/mouse overuse and it shows them that the consequences may not be immediate.

They already have picked up on my vibes that I am not fond of TV because it is a passive activity.  I guess I am indoctrinating my children the same way my dad indoctrinated me with respect to TV but slightly differently. He once threw the TV out the window when I was young after I didn't say hello when he came home from work. He would always prioritise the maintenance of personal relationships and creating things/ideas over anything else and I try to teach my children the same thing (but not in such a memorable way). Whenever someone comes over, all screens are turned off - no ifs no buts. Creations are to be treasured and ideas talked about. All their creations are placed into my special keepsake box array or photos are taken.

They have not watched Doctor Who because I think with their over-active imaginations, they would be frightened. Real-life is tough enough for them deal with (possibly my fault for not insulating them enough) and so because we are still working through that, I will absolutely prohibit any screen time tuned to elicit big emotional roller coasters until I think they are better equipped to deal with it. Apologies for the ramble ... I could go on but I think that is a bit too much already and I suspect it's time for me to self-regulate ...

#19 Canberra Chick

Posted 03 January 2013 - 01:36 PM

All I will say is that when DS got a 'white boomer' Christmas decoration he immediately pointed out that it had a pouch, and boomers are male and don't have pouches...

Oh, and my kids loved the science Christmas party at the CSIRO discovery centre. Yup, geeky science nerds abound in this house.

#20 Liv_DrSperm_sh

Posted 03 January 2013 - 01:42 PM

QUOTE (Canberra chick @ 03/01/2013, 02:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
All I will say is that when DS got a 'white boomer' Christmas decoration he immediately pointed out that it had a pouch, and boomers are male and don't have pouches...

Oh, and my kids loved the science Christmas party at the CSIRO discovery centre. Yup, geeky science nerds abound in this house.


That is awesome! I taught the twins to respond to the "what noise to monkey's make" question with "what species of monkey"....I'm not sure whether they know what a species is, but the looks on people's faces are priceless.

#21 Liv_DrSperm_sh

Posted 03 January 2013 - 01:54 PM

You have just given me my next kids geekathon project Ferdinand!


#22 EBeditor

Posted 03 January 2013 - 02:02 PM

My son's favourite number is Googolplex so I think he is heading in the direction of his computer programmer father. DH has also been teaching DS coding 'for fun'.   unsure.gif  DS is 5.

ETA: Snap Ferdinand!

DD is like me. She likes sparkly shoes and handbags.

#23 i-candi

Posted 03 January 2013 - 02:06 PM

QUOTE (Ferdinand @ 03/01/2013, 02:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Um, my software developer DP is currently teaching my 5yo to count in binary. I fully expect to find them coding together in the next 12 months...

I am convinced there is a geek gene. Neither of us overly encouraged the inner geek to come out in the child, but it has anyway.



lol my DS was emailing me in binary code. He didn't know it but he did use google translate! lol

#24 Bunsen the feral

Posted 03 January 2013 - 02:27 PM

Are we geeks?

Well our eldest is named after Linus Torvalds...

I found out we are expecting a girl (after 2 boys) so immediately set out to find the perfect Disney princess outfit

I also bought her a Tardis onsie which will look lovely teamed with some pink leggings, DS1 is very proudly telling everyone that his sister loves Doctor Who just like him and points his sonic screw driver at my belly for her to "see"

I wrote out "To Daddy love from.... Etc" for DS1 to copy into his fathers day card, he cut it out and pasted it into the card instead.

If you ask the boys "Who ya gonna call?" the four year old shouts "Ghostbusters!", the two year old shouts "Mythbusters!"

Edited by Bunsen, 03 January 2013 - 02:29 PM.


#25 Llama in Pyjamas

Posted 03 January 2013 - 03:31 PM

I've been explaining the periodic table I'm wearing today to my 3.5 year old, after he asked about it.  
Maybe not so much geek, but more nerd or dork? I'm always confused at the distinctions between geek, nerd and dork.

Edited by hoppingllama, 03 January 2013 - 03:38 PM.





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