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Why don't people like donating to charity shops?


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#1 luke's mummu

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:07 PM

I've read a few posts on EB recently where posters have said they don't want to donate their old baby stuff to charity/op shops.

I was wondering why not? I regularly donate stuff and will browse and occasionally buy stuff there as well. Even though we are not "poor" by my standards. I also buy 2nd hand clothes from the school uniform pool because my son wears them out very quickly and/or draws on them with texta.


Interested to hear why/why not.

Thanks Lisa

#2 Jenflea

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:11 PM

I do because none of my friends have kids and I don't have the room to store stuff.
I don't shop in them much though, but might browse in case my 2yr old sees a toy she might like.

#3 Chocolate Addict

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:13 PM

I do but I will not donate to the Salvos ever again. I had a boot full of stuff in really good condition but they turned it down without even looking at it. They only wanted the latest release books and weren't interested in any toys or clothes without even looking at them.

I had the same problem with them when clearing out my Grandfathers house, if a mattress was not like brand new they wouldn't even look at it. We ended up throwing a lot of stuff away. sad.gif

I only donate to Diabetes Australia now as they take almost anything and seem grateful for it. They also collect from you without any hassle and when they say they will.

The Salvo's have left a sour taste in my mouth for many reasons.



#4 Chchgirl

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:14 PM

I did. I cleaned out my late dh's clothes etc out of the wardrobe, rang the Salvos and they came and picked the lot up for me. They were fantastic!

#5 luke's mummu

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:17 PM

Chocolate Addict - did they come to your house or car to collect stuff?

Wow that is a shame they didn't even look at all of your stuff.

Our Salvos have a drop off point (business hours only) and I just leave stuff there in bags/boxes - they don't look thru it in front of you.

#6 tickledpink72

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:22 PM

I personally wont donate to any charity with any religious affiliation.

#7 Jenflea

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:30 PM

I use the Salvos because I can park the car right next to the drop off point(and i don't need to get my toddler out) and they help me get the stuff out of the car.
I think as long as they help people in need I'm not that fussed on their religious affiliations.
Our local Vinnies is almost impossible to put bags of goods in as they little shoot things are TINY.
Re the mattress thing, it's pretty common to NOT take old mattresses as they can be a health risk and not many people want to sleep on old scungy mattresses. Would you?

The thing which DOES annoy me, is that pretty much no charity will take the old cathode ray TV;s, they only want flat screen ones. Perfectly good TV's going to landfill annoys me.

#8 casime

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:32 PM

I took a heap of stuff in the other day, including a baby swing in brand new condition (literally used it about six times, DS hated it) and the woman told me off because I didn't have batteries in it.   rolleyes.gif

#9 luke's mummu

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:36 PM

QUOTE (casime @ 31/12/2012, 10:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I took a heap of stuff in the other day, including a baby swing in brand new condition (literally used it about six times, DS hated it) and the woman told me off because I didn't have batteries in it.   rolleyes.gif


I was looking at the dandelion network website and it says to remove batteries from all products! You can't win can you????

#10 Daisy Goat

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:37 PM

i wont because it is resold at ridiculous prices. To the point that people can go to Big W and Best and Less etc and buy new stuff.

I much prefer to hand them to someone who needs them and appreciates them for something they would otherwise be unable to have at all

#11 Great Dame

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:37 PM

QUOTE (Jenflea @ 31/12/2012, 09:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The thing which DOES annoy me, is that pretty much no charity will take the old cathode ray TV;s, they only want flat screen ones. Perfectly good TV's going to landfill annoys me.


Check your local council.  Ours has a recycling centre that happily took our old tv.

I have no problem with donating to charity shops.  I only hesitate with expensive items because now days Ebayers scrounge the OP shops and re-sell.  I hate the idea of them buying from the Charity shops for 50c and re-selling on Ebay for $$$.  So more expensive items I try to pass on to friends/family.


#12 IsolaBella

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:38 PM

Our old CRT TVs went to a local nursing home.

I am passing my things down to my sister, but have said if there is anything not to her taste to donate to local women's refuge.



#13 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:40 PM

All our furniture is crap and second hand  and not worth donating to charity, so I've only ever donated clothes. Any good clothes I try to sell on eBay but otherwise I just whack them in the bins at the park. No idea what charity it is for though.

#14 katiebear26

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:40 PM

QUOTE (Chocolate Addict @ 31/12/2012, 10:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I do but I will not donate to the Salvos ever again. I had a boot full of stuff in really good condition but they turned it down without even looking at it. They only wanted the latest release books and weren't interested in any toys or clothes without even looking at them.

I had the same problem with them when clearing out my Grandfathers house, if a mattress was not like brand new they wouldn't even look at it.


i used to work for a charity (not salvos) with op shops and it is actually difficult to solve this dilemma. people want to give all sorts of stuff but they need to accept stuff for the shops that will actually SELL, therefore not stuff that looks threadbare or old stuff that will simply clog up their already full shelves.

think about it - every weekend there are a hundred garage sales in any area where you can buy older books for something like 20c each. why would you go to a salvos store and pay more, but what sort of profit would they make if they sold everything for 20c?

re the mattresses - even giving a struggling family (i.e. not selling) a previously used mattress is a health hazzard. they may not have the best health record so giving them an item that has already been used is dangerous and there have been problems with this in the past. even if your mattress is beautifully clean (which i'm sure it is original.gif ) they just can't be sure of everyone coming through the door with those items, so there is a blanket ban. a ban on blankets for the same reason too, if i'm not mistaken biggrin.gif

walk into your local op shop and take note of what is on the shelves - plates, glassware etc. walk in two months later and you will see a lot of the same stuff, or elsewise it would have been thrown away. any viable retail outlet that has stock on the shelves for that long would not be making enough money to operate. these days even the op shops have to try to be viable, as there's not enough money for charities to prop up poor earning stores.


BTW OP - i haven't had the opportunity yet as DD is only little, but when i do get around to clearing stuff out it will be in this order:

- loaning to friends / family for their DDs (what goes around comes around - multiple times!)
- (maybe) selling at the baby & kids market, especially if #2 is a boy and i don't need the girls stuff anymore
- donation to charity

although having said that a lot of it is so worn already that they probably would have to throw it away sad.gif

#15 epl0822

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:47 PM

In my experience, sometimes donating to charity organisations is simply not worth the effort.

Recently I attempted to donate excellent quality baby items, amongst many other things, but was rebuffed by the volunteer staff who said the things I wanted to donate were either not being accepted at the moment, or against their policy, and so on. If I still wanted to go ahead and donate, she told me I could come "tomorrow - but before midday." So basically I had to sort out through the donation boxes again and remove whatever items that weren't satisfactory to her, then drive over in the specified time. I was under the impression that when I got there she was going to look through my stuff and make me take back whatever she didn't want. She also gave me such mixed messages about whether she wanted them or not and I didn't want to give away great quality baby items for them to sit forgotten in a storage room.

It puts me off having to go through a grilling process over what I can and cannot give, then having to sort out and repack the various items.

Not all donation experiences have been like this. The best organisations are the ones who will make it easier for people who donate, by coming over and picking up bulk goods themselves. It's nice to have somebody who actually says thanks - it's not like I'm just passing off rubbish for somebody else to deal with. I've donated a lot of goods in the past and they are in great useable condition, potentially worth a lot of money on ebay.

#16 laridae

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:57 PM

I tend to Freecycle instead - goes straight to the people who need it, they normally pick up, and there is no hassle with certain items not being taken.

#17 TiredbutHappy

Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:07 PM

I donate to charity shops, I'm just picky about which ones.  The one in our area has been featured a few times on ACA & TT for throwing out brand new items with tags attached.  Then there was the time the old guy running the shop literally snatched an item out of mum's hand when she turned around and asked me if I was sure I wanted to donate it.  As a consequence I now drive 20 minutes away just to make sure it goes to a different charity.

#18 Glr-r

Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:11 PM

I donate to charity shops when I don't have emotional attachment to the items - like mine and dh clothes, unused presents etc but for stuff I'm attached to like my kids clothes I usually prefer to pass them onto someone I know, even if I barely know them. I don't know why, it's silly but I find it easy to part with when giving it to someone personally than dropping it in a bin.

#19 MAGS24

Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:11 PM

I don't mind donating but the last few times I have tried to donate clothing and baby items in really good condition, the Salvos wouldn't take them. Now I just try to sell them on Ebay/Gumtree or give to friends.

#20 CallMeProtart

Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:13 PM

Yeah I tend to go freecycle where possible. At least the people getting it actually want it. If I knew for sure the op shops wanted the stuff, I'd do that, as it's charity, but I hear so many stories about stuff they don't want.


#21 Klinkalink

Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:21 PM

I don't donate to charities after being told dismissively that some items weren't good enough (even one still with tags). I now donate all my baby gear to the refugees instead. They are so grateful for absolutely anything, and the families have nothing and no money to buy anything. The beaming smiles from the faces of the refugee mums is worlds apart from the sour looks given to some of our baby clothes by charity/op shop staff.

#22 Chocolate Addict

Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:26 PM

QUOTE
Chocolate Addict - did they come to your house or car to collect stuff?

They come to your house. You ring, organise a time  and they turn up. You just need to leave the stuff out the front by the front door or whatever with "DA' written on it so they know what to take. If it doesn't have "DA on it they will not take it.

Sorry Katiebear but that is BS. Other organisations take the stuff. I went from the Salvo's after they rejected my stuff to another charity and they happily took the stuff, no questions asked.

I will not bother with the Salvo's ever again and no longer give to their door knock appeal for this very reason.



#23 JuniPooks_

Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:40 PM

I have donated directly to people I come across in need. There is no shortage. I also donate cash to charities whose work I want to support.

But yes, I've gone completely off op shops.

#24 babychacha

Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:52 PM

I think these days that clothes are so cheap (kmart, best and less) that the charity shops can't move the slightly worn 2nd hand clothes anymore.

The last time I was in a 2nd hand clothes shop (Vinnies I think), I remember there was a worn plain black tshirt from target selling for $10. Really? And after looking around most of the items were in this category. Ridiculous when you can get the same item brand new in a sale.

Also, I know a lot of charities have problems at this time of year with people just dumping their junk on them and it costs them a lot of money to get rid of it all. I'm thinking particularly of charity bins and bags and bags of stuff being dumped all around it.

I would love to give to refugees.

Is this done via a particular charity/religious organisation?

Edited by babychacha, 31 December 2012 - 10:53 PM.


#25 Natbub0610

Posted 31 December 2012 - 11:19 PM

I think refuges are a great option but because of their purpose, they can't readily advertise there whereabouts.

At least then you know the people receiving the goods are in genuine need and would appreciate the donation.

Op Shops are hard, a lot of them run as 2nd business and as pp said, sometimes it's cheaper to go BigW or Kmart for same thing.




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