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Tummy time


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#1 Wacky Wobbler

Posted 30 December 2012 - 08:25 AM

How much tummy time should I be giving my 2 month old everyday?

Thanks

#2 WithSprinkles

Posted 30 December 2012 - 08:40 AM

I always did a few minutes of tummy time with my DD each awake cycle at that age. I would just get down on the floor with her and usually she would start complaining after 5 mins or so, then I'd pick her up. Probably added up to around 20 mins a day overall I guess. She has very strong neck muscles plus rolled and crawled quite early so I'm guessing that the amount we did was plenty!

#3 lucky 2

Posted 30 December 2012 - 09:55 AM

As much as you can or as often as you think about it, incorporate it into your daily care like the pp and it will really help.



#4 Wacky Wobbler

Posted 31 December 2012 - 03:30 AM

Thanks for your replies. I will admit I often forget, but when I do remember he doesn't like to do it for too long do I do it a couple of times a day, but wasn't sure if it was beneficial spacing it over the whole day.

#5 iwanttosleepin

Posted 31 December 2012 - 03:59 AM

I agree that it is very important and to make a habit of it.

Every wake time when you're home put them down and let them be for a few minutes.  And get down on their level and play while they're on their tummy.

I've seen the outcome when a baby 'who hated tummy time' was just picked up all.  Needless to say that at 3 years of age their gross motor skills are still way behind where they should be.  In particular climbing and navigation.

#6 Sunny003

Posted 31 December 2012 - 04:23 AM

My babies hated tummy time, we did it very rarely. None of them have had issues with gross motor skills.

My 2wk old holds her head up & has started to try to roll (& yes others have seen it, I'm not dreaming lol)

A few mins on the changetable while moisturizing their back? (don't leave obviously though)

#7 José

Posted 31 December 2012 - 07:21 AM

My health nurse said I should be doing a total of 1.5 hours per day for my little one. That sounds like a lot to me and I don't do that much.

#8 ubermum

Posted 31 December 2012 - 07:24 AM

I didn't do it with any of my three. I couldn't take the screaming. We would have tummy to tummy cuddles and chat like that, usually adding up to an hour or two per day. Now that my third is 6 months, she will spend a couple of hours per day on her play mat, in any position she chooses.

#9 Jenflea

Posted 31 December 2012 - 07:50 AM

My daughter hated it. I used to sit on the couch with my legs up(feet flat on the couch recliner, knees up) with her on my legs sort of upright. She liked that more.
She's never had a problem with gross motor skills!


#10 Wacky Wobbler

Posted 31 December 2012 - 03:43 PM

We do a lot of tummy to tummy cuddles so I guess that might count too. 1.5 hours seems like a lot to me though.

#11 Jenflea

Posted 31 December 2012 - 04:17 PM

I also don't believe in doing something to a tiny baby if it makes them scream. To me, that's not good parenting.

#12 Wacky Wobbler

Posted 31 December 2012 - 04:21 PM

I don't make him do it. If he starts crying I pick him up. He will usually do it for a couple of minutes before he starts crying. Today he has screamed as soon as I put him down so he hasn't had any tummy time, yesterday he was happy to do it for 10 minutes.

#13 mumma_ox

Posted 31 December 2012 - 04:24 PM

My DD would have spent most of her day on her tummy if we let her at two months - she would even roll herself onto her tummy to sleep...I wasn't quite ready for that!  I found she only cried when she couldn't see me/someone.  If you have a toddler or another little one who can lie on the floor, great.  If not, just try to give it as much time as you can.

#14 Stoked

Posted 31 December 2012 - 07:00 PM

The guidelines I was given by a paediatric physiotherapist were at least one hour of tummy tiime at 3 months of age and at least 2 hours of tummy time by 6 months of age. Doing twice as much is considered very good. She also classified my then three-month-old as having 'reduced stamina' because he could only last 3-4 minutes at a time before getting upset. 10 minutes at a time is great for a 3 mth old.

Obviously a younger baby will be doing less but it can actually build up quite quickly if you get a bit obsessed with tummy time (like I did, heh original.gif). Singing, tummy to tummy time, roly-poly toys, musical toys like rainmakers and bells - anything goes to keep them happy on their tummy.

#15 Stoked

Posted 31 December 2012 - 07:02 PM

QUOTE (Jenflea @ 31/12/2012, 05:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I also don't believe in doing something to a tiny baby if it makes them scream. To me, that's not good parenting.

Here's an interesting blog post that somewhat echoes your point of view: http://www.alignedandwell.com/katysays/nat...ly-strong-baby/

ETA: not so much 'echoes' as 'your words reminded me of this blog post...'

Edited by Stoked, 31 December 2012 - 07:06 PM.


#16 ~Supernova~

Posted 31 December 2012 - 07:03 PM

I did it for as long as they were ok with it. DD hated it, and ended up with torticollis and STILL has a flat spot, so I perservered a bit more with DS.

#17 Jenflea

Posted 31 December 2012 - 08:43 PM

Stoked, that was a really interesting blog post.
i do admit that I have my doubts about tummy time and it's 'vital' importance because as humans we pretty much all managed to grow up and learn to walk at talk and stand upright pretty well without it.
I'm not saying NEVER do tummy time, but I think it's importance is a bit over stressed especially for babies who (like mine) cant' stand it and get really upset. Plus not all parents are physically able to get down on the floor at eye level of a baby lying on it's front. I also wonder how often babies in caveman times and indigenous cultures spent/spend time on their fronts, or if it's purely a Western thing.

#18 katiebear26

Posted 31 December 2012 - 08:59 PM

my community nurse said 15-20min a day. DD absolutely HATED it but from about 6-7 weeks old i just did it for a little bit each time she got up from a nap until she started to cry (so she didnt have a full tummy). first few times it was about 5 seconds, but it gradually got longer and now she can stay there for a few minutes and she's got great head control.

not sure if your bub likes it but it can help to start them off doing tummy time on you while you recline back, like on a bed. and use a toy to attract their attention if possible, it draws it out by a few seconds, and every second counts :-)

i figure once they start to (eta) whinge their neck is sore, so i didn't go longer than that.

ETA - until 6-7 weeks i didn't do much at all, that haze i was in made me forget to do it!

Edited by katiebear26, 31 December 2012 - 09:19 PM.


#19 tibs

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:28 PM

My first born had quite a bit but I'm now up to #3 and really I just don't have the time to supervise tummy time, and with a 2 year old running around I just can't leave baby on the mat.  The poor thing spends half her life in the car/capsule when not in bed so there is no way she is getting those 'recommended' amounts.

#20 WinterIsComing

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:29 PM

I read in a book (I think it was "Baby Love" ) that some researches looked at native American Indians who swaddled their babies and laid them in cribs for many months. Still, their babies developed their gross motor skills to the same timeframe as others. So the tummy time and its necessity is arguable, based on those findings.

I'll give my own anecdote, though...I did tummy time with DS, which he did willingly, for a short period most days. I'd like to stress that he did it quite willingly and was lifting his head with what could be described as happy, excited sounds almost straight from birth. He rolled at 3 months, crawled at 7 and walked at 9. My theory is that he was born well developed and the tummy time was just an opportunity to see that.







#21 lucky 2

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:33 PM

QUOTE
I also wonder how often babies in caveman times and indigenous cultures spent/spend time on their fronts, or if it's purely a Western thing.

Tummy time wasn't as big a thing until we adopted the SIDs guideline to sleep baby on his/her back.
An unintended health consequence of this was an increase in misshapen heads in babies (ie flat head syndrome/plagiocephaly/brachiocephaly) and a delay in babies achieve some of the developmental milestones because babies were spending less time on their tummies (ie not being put on tummy for sleep) and spending more time on their backs (parents fearing putting baby on tummy even when awake).
http://www.sidsandkids.org/wp-content/uplo...0_Cit-sugg1.pdf
If you haven't had any contact with babies that have had a problem such as above (the majority of babies) I could understand thinking that there seems to be too much focus on tummy time.
Unless we reverse the SIDS guideline for back sleeping (which wont happen because of its success in reducing the rate number of sudden deaths) this will continue to be a problem if babies are not given the opportunity to be off their backs.
The article above states that some more recent research is indicating that it is ? not the back lying position but other infant care practices that are predisposing babies to have flattened heads.
Babies were probably not put down in earlier civilisations, perhaps carried in upright positions?

#22 tibs

Posted 31 December 2012 - 09:35 PM

QUOTE (WinterIsComing @ 31/12/2012, 10:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'll give my own anecdote, though...I did tummy time with DS, which he did willingly, for a short period most days. I'd like to stress that he did it quite willingly and was lifting his head with what could be described as happy, excited sounds almost straight from birth. He rolled at 3 months, crawled at 7 and walked at 9. My theory is that he was born well developed and the tummy time was just an opportunity to see that.


My second was the same and I would say I did less tummy time with her than my first who was slower in all of the above (e.g. didn't walk until after he was 1).  My second was practically born with head control so your theory rings true to me.

#23 Stoked

Posted 07 January 2013 - 09:10 PM

QUOTE (Jenflea @ 31/12/2012, 09:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I also wonder how often babies in caveman times and indigenous cultures spent/spend time on their fronts, or if it's purely a Western thing.

Apparently they are just carried around in the arms of adults - mostly the mother but of course tribal living means the baby is passed around to aunties etc. Small children also carry babies around.

In Bali, apparently, babies never touch the ground until they turn six months old - until then they are considered heavenly things not ready for this world. They have a setting on the ground ceremony at 6 mo and once put on the ground the baby starts crawling. As in the blog post I linked to above, it looks like all the muscles needed for neck control/crawling can be developed by just holding on to the adult and balancing on their body as the baby is carried in arms.

There's an interesting book on the subject of carrying babies - The Continuum Concept. Here are some photos from the tribe the author lived with: http://www.continuum-concept.org/YequanaPhotos.html




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