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How to wean off bottle
Very demanding, heavy wetting 2yo


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#1 Le-a

Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:56 PM

Ds is almost two.

Since finishing breast feeding at 18mo, he has a bottle at sleep times. In the past month, he has become gradually more and more "attached" to his "moot" as he calls it. Lately, to get to sleep at night he will have one or two 300ml bottles of half milk/water. He more often than not will wake in the night and start hollering, "MORE MOOT MAMA!!!" until I get him another bottle. Then he demands another in the morning when he comes into our bed for a cuddle.

I don't know how to stop this, It seems to me that his waking in the night is due to his reliance on the bottle to get back to sleep, so it's actually made his sleeping worse.

Also, because he's drinking so much, he's leaking though his nappy by the morning. His cot is soaked and our bed often sports a wet spot as well (ewwww). I'm washing bed sheets like there's no tomorrow. Not that I would bother washing bed sheets if the world was ending tomorrow, but you know what I mean...

We double nappied him last night and he still burst through the barrier. Maybe I'm not doing it right...

Anywho, any advice on how to cut back the bottles would be greatly appreciated. I can only guess that cold turkey is the best option, but im dreading that.

Thanks!

#2 Feral*Spikey*

Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:31 PM

First, you need to find out if there is another cause for the excessive drinking.

Can I suggest that you visit your GP and rule out any underlying causes? I don't want to alarm you, but drinking that much (and of course the resulting 'flow through') is often a sign of diabetes.

Second, brolly sheets are your new best friend. I'd also put a towel or two on top to catch additional flow.

#3 Le-a

Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:41 PM

Thanks spikey, I'll check out brolly sheets.

Perhaps I'm being a bit naive, but I wasn't really worried about the drinking because he's not demanding bottles outside of sleep times, IYKWIM? he doesn't drink much during the day, just sips of water. I will mention it next time we are at the Dr, thanks for the heads up.

#4 ubermum

Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:49 PM

I don't do the weaning thing. I just cut out night bottles and gave a cup. They drink less from a cup. Yes, their was initial protest, but I shrugged, showed the empty cupboard where the bottles went and said "Oh no, bottles all gone".

#5 Le-a

Posted 27 December 2012 - 09:34 PM

Thanks ├╝bermum I hadn't even considered offering a cup.

#6 NotRocketScience

Posted 27 December 2012 - 10:10 PM

DS was addicted to his bottle. I started giving milk in a sippy cup. He soon gave it up. He seemed to get comfort from the bottle but didn't get it from the sippy cup.

#7 tamietamara

Posted 27 December 2012 - 10:17 PM

We did the transition to the sippy cup and then normal cup with both of ours too. Worked a treat. Still got their milk but the sucking bit no longer was there an it lost its novelty very quickly. My two went from bottles to sippy or cups to no milk at all in a few months.

#8 MrsW87

Posted 27 December 2012 - 10:22 PM

DS1 is 2 and still has a bottle at night for bed. If he asks for another one, I usually say "Lay down and rest your eyes and mummy will go and make it for you".

Nine out of ten, he goes back to sleep and sleeps through. LOL

#9 ~ppp~

Posted 27 December 2012 - 10:23 PM

-

Edited by knowsnotmuch, 01 March 2013 - 04:28 PM.


#10 Jenferal

Posted 27 December 2012 - 10:26 PM

By 2 or so, I'd be just saying no and cutting the bottles as well.
It took a few nights(this was night weaning from breast milk though, not bottles) but it improved my DD's sleep and she drinks more during the day.
I put a sippy cup of water in he cot(take and toss, don't seem to leak) and if she woke at night the first week or so, i offered water. It worked pretty well.


I read somewhere recently that drinking more during the day CAN help with night TT as well. Something to do with expanding the bladder during the day so it holds on...not sure how accurate it is, but more during the day can't hurt.

#11 Le-a

Posted 27 December 2012 - 10:51 PM

Thank you so much for all your replies, the sippy cup is a really good suggestion. Quick question, when you've been transitioning from bottle to sippy cup, and baby is hollering for milk, do you give them the cup and walk out, or stay with them while they drink it? Assuming they were the sealable, non drip variety...

#12 Feralishous

Posted 27 December 2012 - 11:00 PM

we nightweaned at 18 months (from boob, cosleeping) by just offering water and saying "(boo)bees are sleeping, have some water'
took a few nights, no tears.
Though she was only having a feed overnight maybe twice a week

#13 ~ky~

Posted 28 December 2012 - 01:43 AM

M eldest DD was addicted to her cup of milk and would call out for refills a couple of times a night. SHe also used to wet right through and would often need a change in the night.

I watered the milk down until there was far more water than milk and she would just throw it away in disgust. It took a couple of nights, but she eventually stopped asking and her sleep improved out of sight as did her demeanour during the day.

She was around 15mo when we did this.

#14 JECJEC

Posted 28 December 2012 - 07:30 AM

QUOTE (ubermum @ 27/12/2012, 05:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't do the weaning thing. I just cut out night bottles and gave a cup. They drink less from a cup. Yes, their was initial protest, but I shrugged, showed the empty cupboard where the bottles went and said "Oh no, bottles all gone".

This is exactly what I did.

#15 Bubblicious

Posted 28 December 2012 - 07:36 AM

I swapped the milk for water, so she still had the sucking comfort, but it was not milk.

She stopped waking for a drink unless she was actually thirsty, and her sleep improved in general.

Now to stop her hopping in with me every single night lol

#16 Jenferal

Posted 28 December 2012 - 07:49 AM

I wouldn't walk out right away. I'd lean over the cot and offer the cup, then once they';d finished drinking put it back up near the end of the cot so they don't knock it over while sleeping.
Also in the early days they might need comfort if they aren't getting it from the bottle.

#17 .Jerry.

Posted 28 December 2012 - 07:56 AM

At two, Molly used to wake two or three times a night for a bottle.  ohmy.gif   It was a habit, added to the fact that she hardly ate any solids.
We just threw her bottles out one day and let her see us throwing them in the bin.  (secretly I later fetched them out of the bin and hid them, just in case...).
She woke a few times for a few nights, but we reminded her the bottles were gone and offered her water in a straw cup instead.  She went back to sleep pretty easily.
It was quite simple for us to go cold turkey.


#18 Ice Queen

Posted 28 December 2012 - 08:06 AM

I 'lost' the bottles.  Silly mummy.  Terrible mummy.  So sorry but the shop doesnt have anymore.  I know, mum is terrible!  tongue.gif

Problem solved.

#19 toc76

Posted 28 December 2012 - 08:10 AM

Santa took our youngest sons bottle.  My son is just over 2.  we told him for a week or so before that Santa was going to take them and then leave him a special present.  We put them out together on christmas eve and the next morning there was a new scooter and a letter from Santa about taking the bottles.  no problems so far, when he has asked for a bottle we have just reminded him that Santa took them.  He then choose what cup he wants to use.  Did the same with our eldest for dummies when he was 3.

#20 Expelliarmus

Posted 28 December 2012 - 09:01 AM

Don't use a sippy cup that doesn't leak. It will be the same as the bottle

Ask me how I know ... *sigh*

Stop it ASAP because it's a huge dental risk. DD2 had this difficulty and yes it made her sleeping worse and she ended up under a General for dental work @ 2yo.

#21 elizabethany

Posted 28 December 2012 - 09:19 AM

We changed over from bottles to a sippy cup at about 19 months, but it didn't reduce the problem.  He was waking up to 6 times a night asking for a drink.  At 20 months we did the big sleep changes, no dummies, no milk in bed, and moved from a cot to a full single bed.  We changed everything in one go, so there was only one shock.  The first few nights were hard, but it improved surprisingly quickly.

He takes longer to go to sleep now, and talks in bed, but he has started to sleep though the night and goes to bed without milk/water or a dummy.




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