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Wanting presents that are not age appropriate


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#1 The 7 Dwarfs

Posted 20 December 2012 - 04:32 PM

Excluding presents that are not age appropriate because there is a safety issue, if your child really wanted something for Christmas that wasn't really for their age, would you have an issue buying it for them? Would it make a difference if the toy in question was for a much older age group or a much younger age group?

#2 Sentient Puddle

Posted 20 December 2012 - 04:36 PM

DD wants an item that we know she wont really be that "into" so we are getting her the item (DS) and something else that we know she will like as well.  We are getting it for her as her Brother is getting one and I am sure at some point in the future she will play with it.  We are suckers and want an easy life!   xmas_cool.gif
Edited to add - she will look after it - that is not the problem - she is just not that into computer type games - but because her Brother wants one - she does too!

Edited by ILBB, 20 December 2012 - 04:37 PM.


#3 CupOfCoffee

Posted 20 December 2012 - 04:42 PM

It would really depend.

If my 3 year old wanted hitman absolution for the PS3, I would say no...

If my 3 year old wanted a lego set for 6 year olds, I would buy it.

If my 14 year old wanted beer, I would say no.

If my 14 year old wanted a teddy, I would say yes.

If my 14 year old wanted hitman absolution (MA15+) I would say yes


#4 namie

Posted 20 December 2012 - 04:43 PM

If it was something for a younger age group than the child requesting I wouldn't have a problem with it, but I don't like to go too many years older.

DS1 (3yrs) is desperate for Lego but he's just not quite ready and with DS2 (21 months) following him everywhere, I'm not prepared to get any yet.

I've shown him the age ranges on the boxes and pointed out that he's only 3 but the boxes say 5 - 7 (or whatever) and he's fine with that for now. Actually, he's noticing age ranges on everything now, even to the extent of saying 'Mum, when I'm 12 I can have that enormous Lego!' and 'Maybe when I'm 26 I can  drive a car' (that was a bit random, no idea where that came from, lol!).

He knows that Duplo is for his age and we make sure we get lots of play time out of that.

#5 JustBeige

Posted 20 December 2012 - 04:48 PM

QUOTE (The 7 Dwarfs @ 20/12/2012, 05:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Excluding presents that are not age appropriate because there is a safety issue, if your child really wanted something for Christmas that wasn't really for their age, would you have an issue buying it for them? Would it make a difference if the toy in question was for a much older age group or a much younger age group?

Depending on the object they wouldnt get it and I would just either say no (now that they are older) or tell them that Santa wont bring it because Santa knows that mummy has already said no (when they were younger).   In both instances I would tell them that its not appropriate for them because they were not adults or older.  If if was a couple of years out, I would promise at a certain age that we would talk about it again.   ie: DS desperately wants a TV in his room.  We dont like TVs in kids rooms but have told him when he is 13 we will have another conversation about it.    He stopped nagging me when I told him that if he keeps mentioning it, it wont happen at all.



If you are talking about getting a teen a pillow pet (for example) then I wouldnt care and would probably roll my eyes at them, but I would get it for them.

It really does depend on the object of their desire.

#6 HRH Countrymel

Posted 20 December 2012 - 04:51 PM

My Grandmother gave me a proper hand held electric mixer for my 6th Birthday because I liked cooking.

We were a safety conscious home but I was allowed to use that mixer whenever I wanted to - because it was mine! I never hurt myself, and I took it with me when I left home.

I really appreciated my interest being taken 'seriously' by her.  A little kiddy mixing bowl set would have been patronising!

#7 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 20 December 2012 - 04:54 PM

For something like Lego the ages are a guide only.

My 5yo happily builds the 12+ aged Lego stuff by himself.



#8 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 20 December 2012 - 04:54 PM

DP.

Edited by lsolaBella, 20 December 2012 - 05:02 PM.


#9 LookMumNoHands

Posted 20 December 2012 - 04:57 PM

6 yo DS is getting a Lego set for Christmas that is recommended for 16yo +. I have no problem with that, and he'll probably have it completed in time for plum pudding  happy.gif . He's also getting a PS3 game that is rated 8+, but not because of violence, because of the difficulty level. He'll also be fine with that present.

5yo DS I wouldn't, because he's totally different, and would struggle with presents not age appropriate.

#10 BadCat

Posted 20 December 2012 - 05:00 PM

As long as the content is age appropriate, so not too sexualised or violent, then I don't worry about age reccommendations.  I go by whether I think my child will get use and enjoyment out of it.  That tends to rule out things that are well below their age group as well because they really aren't likely to enjoy them as more than a passing novelty.

#11 Jembo

Posted 20 December 2012 - 05:10 PM

It would depend what it is, I tend to use the age appropriate as a guide.  For instance both lego and playdough are something both my kids had well before the age appropriate age.

If we are talking a game or DVD rated M for my 10 yr old, no.

#12 Charri36

Posted 20 December 2012 - 05:15 PM

I bought something far to young for my DS15 (16 on boxing day) He picked it out, it's a blow up....











turtle for our pool. You sit on it, has a picture of a 3yo on it, he desperately wanted it. If he want's to be silly and request a blow up turtle so be it. ps - I bought him a beach towel with green turtles on it too (adult not kiddle), he will laugh so much when he gets it.

#13 Feral timtam

Posted 20 December 2012 - 05:34 PM

QUOTE (Charri36 @ 20/12/2012, 05:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I bought something far to young for my DS15 (16 on boxing day) He picked it out, it's a blow up....


Am I juvenile for thinking it was one of those blow up squeaky hammers?
Those are so much fun and banned from our house because I can't trust DH with them.

As to my kids wanting age inappropriate presents, if it's for a younger age group I'll get it, if it's for an older group the answer is usually heck no.
DS1 has asked for "a blanket like 'Anna's", one of those plush baby blankets with satin trim from Best and Less. Unfortunately he asked after all the Christmas shopping had been finished, so whether he gets one for Christmas or not is dependant on how up to tackling the shops I am on Monday.

#14 RainyDays

Posted 20 December 2012 - 05:44 PM

I'm a stickler for following age restrictions on things with small pieces.  Both my kids are/were obsessed with putting everything in their mouth.

DD is now 4 and that isn't such an issue, but she's only allowed to play with smaller items when the 1 year old is in a different room.

As far as movies go, I don't have a problem with a bit of mild crude humor that goes over their heads, but I don't like anything violent.  

DD loves board games, and is pretty good at them, so she will be getting some 6+ ones.



#15 Buggylicious

Posted 20 December 2012 - 06:06 PM

Depends on the child and the gift DS (4) wanted some lego sets that were for age ranges 7+. I told him Santa won't get them but he would get him ones that say 5 because he knows he will be 5 before next Christmas. I told him that because the bigger ones were way out of his ability range, honestly he isn't even up to the stage of lego and should still be using duplo. DP builds everything for him and he just plays with them.

DD gets things that are for older age ranges but being the younger sibling she seems to be growing up much faster trying to keep up with her brother.

#16 mez70

Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:21 PM

I guess it depends on what the gift is and more importantly who and why it is wanted.

DS2 this year has a thing for Garbage trucks and has wanted the lego City Garbage truck for AGES so Santa is bringing it knowing that DH will have to assemble it, yet DS plays with his brother and sisters Lego often so I am not worried as such.. He would love an Ipod as well mind you he is NOT getting one lol... Mind you he has access to mine which is loaded with stuff for him anyway..


#17 F.E.B.E

Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:26 PM

Slightly off topic, but this is a wonderful toy garbage truck for 2+:
http://www.amazon.com/WOW-Flip-Tip-Fred-Se...e/dp/B000F44PGQ

Both my children have played with it for years and it's still very sturdy.


#18 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:36 PM

QUOTE (SlinkyMalinki @ 20/12/2012, 06:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm a stickler for following age restrictions on things with small pieces.  Both my kids are/were obsessed with putting everything in their mouth.

DD is now 4 and that isn't such an issue, but she's only allowed to play with smaller items when the 1 year old is in a different room.

As far as movies go, I don't have a problem with a bit of mild crude humor that goes over their heads, but I don't like anything violent.  

DD loves board games, and is pretty good at them, so she will be getting some 6+ ones.



My DS2 at 5 yrs I still have to tell him Lego does not go in the mouth. DD at three is also an oral fixator. She still comes into e crying that her dummy is gone... It went over a year ago.

#19 NotBitzerMaloney

Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:42 PM

DS (5) wants - and will be getting - Skylanders, which I think is rated for ages 10+ for the game and 6+ for the toys, so the answer is a partial yes. He also shows interest in toys that are for much younger children sometimes, and I will buy them.
Basically it would be on a case by case basis.

#20 kabailz13

Posted 20 December 2012 - 11:05 PM

My kids share in toys, movies and everything I suppose that covers a wide range of ages.

My 4 and 6 year olds love Jurassic Park and my 11 year old still loves little petshop!

Within reason, we oblige. I wouldn't get my 6 or 11 year olds baby toys simply because they would be a very short lived fad but other than that, most things are up for discussion.

James often gets Lego sets aimed at 12+ simply because he is into Lego. Ellie shows very little interest in that sort of thing so she doesn't get those sorts of toys.

#21 notorico

Posted 21 December 2012 - 06:25 AM

It depends on the present and the kid. My DS is getting the Lego Monster Fighters Haunted House for Christmas which is recommended for 14+ and he is 7. He is very good at lego though and I think he will be able to manage it on his own or with only a little help. He also wants an ipad, which I would prefer to wait until his older his teenage brothers are getting one each and he will probably be put out but his time will come for that.

#22 The 7 Dwarfs

Posted 21 December 2012 - 06:29 AM

My DD almost 8 wants a Dora toy that looks more suited for me 2 year old DS. I did get it for her as she is getting 3 other presents and it wasn't the main one, but I  kept looking at it as I was wrapping thinking I should take it back, but I guess if she doesn't enjoy it for too long, then she has younger brothers who will get use out of it.




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