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Delayed introduction of solids is now bad.


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#1 Excentrique Feral

Posted 15 December 2012 - 10:16 AM

Just read this article: http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/parenting...v-1226537159388

They are saying that delayed introduction of solids is not helping to prevent anaphylaxis, so they are about to change the recommendation for introduction of solids.

'But many now suspect that delayed weaning, a lack of vitamin D from sunlight and hyper-cleanliness could be to blame, through overstimulating children's allergic reaction to certain foods.
The National Health and Medical Research Council will soon release new guidelines for infant feeding, which will relax its current recommendation that babies be exclusively breastfed for six months.'

'Dr Mullins said the longstanding advice to avoid risky foods like peanut and egg until children are older had not prevented allergies.'

'The NHMRC's existing limit of six months mirrors that of the World Health Organisation, but clashes with advice from Australia's top allergy specialists.'


Thoughts?

Edited by Excentrique, 15 December 2012 - 12:45 PM.


#2 GamerMum

Posted 15 December 2012 - 10:22 AM

It's all so confusing I'm surprised that anyone knows what to do any more. I've had three different doctors tell me three different things when it comes to DD. I have allergies to some very common foods, and one said start her on them from 4 months, one said 6 months, and one said 12 months! So I really have no idea.

And by the looks of it, the people who write these recommendations have no idea either!

#3 qak

Posted 15 December 2012 - 10:42 AM

It sounds more and more like there is no one single link.

Certainly the number of kids with allergies is frightening these days. When I went to school allergies were pretty rare, there was a bit of asthma around. There was certainly not ever any rules about bringing any type of food to school.

#4 Excentrique Feral

Posted 15 December 2012 - 10:59 AM

Personally I do wonder if it has something to do with sterile living. The body doesn't have so many pathogens to fight, so it attacks the food instead.

#5 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 15 December 2012 - 11:06 AM

QUOTE (Excentrique @ 15/12/2012, 11:59 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Personally I do wonder if it has something to do with sterile living. The body doesn't have so many pathogens to fight, so it attacks the food instead.

Of all the theories floating around this is the one that interests me the most, and seems to have the most merit (from my completely unscientific background of course!)

#6 blackbird

Posted 15 December 2012 - 11:12 AM

Maybe our food is just crappier than it has ever been before.

#7 caitiri

Posted 15 December 2012 - 11:24 AM

I have heard one theory (of unknown scientific validity) that its more about the way food is produced then anything else for example the varieties of food that are the easiest to grow are also more allergen producing.

Could be utter nonsense I have no idea

#8 Betty_D

Posted 15 December 2012 - 11:30 AM

It is so confusing. With our DS, we couldn't decide whether to go for 4 or 6 months, so we went bang in the middle and started at 5. The decision was easier to make as by that point he had started to show an interest in what we were eating.

Parents are just trying to do what's best for their children and these conflicting reports make it just that much harder. I also dislike the insinuation that these allergies are either caused or prevented by a parent's decision as to when to introduce solids.

#9 Smoo

Posted 15 December 2012 - 11:38 AM

They ignored the follow up to that report after they found the correlation they actually found- kids with asthma and allergies wean later BECAUSE of the asthma/allergies not the other way around... I can't find that study now, will keep looking - of course that part of the study got no publicity at all

It's all contradictory anyway I started solids before 6 month because DS was interested in them, I am a big believer in go with what works for the child on this since I really don't think the doctors have a clue on this one

#10 Angelot

Posted 15 December 2012 - 11:58 AM

I have an immunology major in my original degree.

My understanding - perhaps a bit rusty now, without going back to the papers to check - is that if you introduce potential allergens earlier, the body is less likely later to react to them as "foreign" (what causes an allergic reaction).  I introduced solids to DD at 4 months and made a point of introducing eggs, peanut butter, almond meal - those sorts of common allergy foods - very quickly.  

That is, to my understanding, probably the best way to go with regard to introducing foods.  I also suspect the over-cleanliness thing plays a part in allergy development, but that's a separate issue.

However, Madame Catty is right.  Introducing solids isn't the same as stopping breastfeeding altogether.  The factors playing in to the decision as to when to wean are complex and personal and I wouldn't dream of weighing in with an opinion as to when anyone should do so, except to say that I don't believe that extended breastfeeding offers any additional protection against the development of allergies.

#11 Feralishous

Posted 15 December 2012 - 12:06 PM

QUOTE (Madame Catty @ 15/12/2012, 09:41 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What an outrageously irresponsible and confusing report.

There is NO WAY NHMRC would recommend weaning (as in stopping breast milk) at 6 months which is how the article is worded.

From my readings, the NHMRC are NOT changing their guidelines.  They recently reviewed the research and the guidelines will remain "around 6 mths" for the introduction of solids.  That does not translate to four or five months as stated in the article.

Let's not forget The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy have sponsors from Baby food companies.  Call me a cynic.  http://www.allergy.org.au/about-ascia/sponsors


I agree.
the draft says '22-26 weeks' for introduction of solids. And there haven't been any studies done with exclusively bf babies and allergies. As formula is a homogenous product, I'd personally think that as bf babies are exposed to allergens through mums milk, there would be 2 sets of guidelines for allergy prevention.


#12 Procrastinator5000

Posted 15 December 2012 - 12:16 PM

I don't understand the over-cleanliness thing.

What aspects of our lives are cleaner than they were when we were all growing up? Isn't the cliche that today's women don't clean their houses nearly as well as our 'housewife' mothers?

I know it's anecdata but my mother wasn't a brilliant cleaner, but I'm even worse. The same goes for almost everyone I know, though their mothers were much better housekeepers than mine.

#13 Mmmcheese

Posted 15 December 2012 - 12:24 PM

Procrastinator, the way the specialist briefly explained it to us is that people get less sick now (I think due to vaccinations, antibiotics for eg) so kids are less exposed that way. I'm pretty sure I've read that children that grow up on farms and with pets are less likely to get allergies because of their exposure to animal poo! So it's not really about how often you mop your floors.

#14 Feral_Pooks

Posted 15 December 2012 - 12:30 PM

Meh.

I have friends in a few cultures where babies at often fed soups, stews, eggs and overripe fruit and such pretty much whenever the food is available and baby starts to look interested, or when they think the baby seems "hungry" and the milk isn't "enough". Mums who have problems feeding or with supply often give babies (particularly older babies, sort of 3, 4 months) goat's or cow's milk and/or other mums will feed the baby too. They hadn't even heard of egg or nut allergies until coming to Australia and I am pretty sure the stats bear out the fact they just don't have the issues with allergies we do.

I have always been cynical of the existing guidelines and I hate the way that mums are told to ignore their instincts and personal expertise in their children to follow some silly guideline that isn't even evidence based.

#15 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 15 December 2012 - 12:36 PM

QUOTE (Procrastinator5000 @ 15/12/2012, 12:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't understand the over-cleanliness thing.

What aspects of our lives are cleaner than they were when we were all growing up? Isn't the cliche that today's women don't clean their houses nearly as well as our 'housewife' mothers?

I know it's anecdata but my mother wasn't a brilliant cleaner, but I'm even worse. The same goes for almost everyone I know, though their mothers were much better housekeepers than mine.

I think it's because the products we use are probably stronger than what was available when we were kids.  Think hospital-grade cleaners, anti-bacterial washes and wipes, etc.  A lot of mum carry baby wipes and anti-bacterial gels in their bags nowadays, for their babies & kids, etc.

#16 HurryUpAlready

Posted 15 December 2012 - 12:44 PM

QUOTE (Procrastinator5000 @ 15/12/2012, 10:16 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't understand the over-cleanliness thing.

What aspects of our lives are cleaner than they were when we were all growing up? Isn't the cliche that today's women don't clean their houses nearly as well as our 'housewife' mothers?

I know it's anecdata but my mother wasn't a brilliant cleaner, but I'm even worse. The same goes for almost everyone I know, though their mothers were much better housekeepers than mine.


I know plenty of people who are obsessive about using hand sanitizer gel and/or wipes, frequently throughout the day on themselves & their children. This is one aspect that would be very different from our mother's generation.



#17 lucky 2

Posted 15 December 2012 - 12:45 PM

QUOTE (Madame Catty @ 15/12/2012, 12:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What an outrageously irresponsible and confusing report.

There is NO WAY NHMRC would recommend weaning (as in stopping breast milk) at 6 months which is how the article is worded.

From my readings, the NHMRC are NOT changing their guidelines.  They recently reviewed the research and the guidelines will remain "around 6 mths" for the introduction of solids.  That does not translate to four or five months as stated in the article.

Let's not forget The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy have sponsors from Baby food companies.  Call me a cynic.  http://www.allergy.org.au/about-ascia/sponsors

This+++
The NHMRC spokesperson did not comment and the guidelines have always been around 6 months and this doesn't give leeway to commence at 4 months  wacko.gif .

Wait a few weeks till the Infant Feeding Guidelines are released, only then will we know what they are.

#18 Excentrique Feral

Posted 15 December 2012 - 12:45 PM

QUOTE (Madame Catty @ 15/12/2012, 11:41 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What an outrageously irresponsible and confusing report.

There is NO WAY NHMRC would recommend weaning (as in stopping breast milk) at 6 months which is how the article is worded.

From my readings, the NHMRC are NOT changing their guidelines.  They recently reviewed the research and the guidelines will remain "around 6 mths" for the introduction of solids.  That does not translate to four or five months as stated in the article.

Let's not forget The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy have sponsors from Baby food companies.  Call me a cynic.  http://www.allergy.org.au/about-ascia/sponsors


When they say weaning, I think it refers to the introduction of solids, not to completely stopping b/feeding. After all the introduction of solids is the beginning of a very long process of weaning and you introduce more and more food to replace the milk. I might change the title so that it makes more sense.

QUOTE (Procrastinator5000 @ 15/12/2012, 12:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't understand the over-cleanliness thing.

What aspects of our lives are cleaner than they were when we were all growing up? Isn't the cliche that today's women don't clean their houses nearly as well as our 'housewife' mothers?

I know it's anecdata but my mother wasn't a brilliant cleaner, but I'm even worse. The same goes for almost everyone I know, though their mothers were much better housekeepers than mine.


Even your toilet cleaner will kill all the germs. I don't know anyone who wants to lick the toilet bowl personally, but they put antibacterials in EVERYTHING now. I think our food is more sterile than it used to be as well.


#19 raone

Posted 15 December 2012 - 12:47 PM

I also know alot of women who don't allow their children to play in the dirt. And if they do get a little dirty they must immediately wash it off. I wonder if this plays a factor since my whole childhood was spent covered in some sort of muck biggrin.gif

So not so much exposure to unclean households but just exposure to the world in general.

#20 EBeditor

Posted 15 December 2012 - 12:54 PM

QUOTE
I also dislike the insinuation that these allergies are either caused or prevented by a parent's decision as to when to introduce solids.


I don't think anyone is blaming parents, it's just research. Of course people follow the advice at the time, and they weren't to know. Even now, researchers don't sound 100% sure of the new theories.

I introduced solids when my babies indicated they were ready, which was around 5 months. Especially the 2nd time around, we did baby led weaning, so hardly any 'mush' and in to a variety of family food pretty quickly. It just made sense to me.


#21 vanessa71

Posted 15 December 2012 - 12:59 PM

When my two were babies, the guidelines were exclusively breastfeed until 6 months, then introduce solids, that is exactly what I did. We have no history of allergies in my family and I did not avoid any foods like eggs or nuts while I was feeding. Neither of them have any allergies to food. I am also anti hand sanitiser which i think is causing more problems than people give it credit for.

I think there are always going to be people with allergies, no matter what you do, reason for the rise?, I am not sure, but I don't think it just comes down to when solids were introduced.



#22 Holidayromp

Posted 15 December 2012 - 01:05 PM

another childless 'expert' opinion  rolleyes.gif ?

#23 Azadel

Posted 15 December 2012 - 01:23 PM

QUOTE (Holidayromp @ 15/12/2012, 02:05 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
another childless 'expert' opinion  rolleyes.gif ?


I wasn't aware giving birth made you an expert on matters of immunology and allergens? I must put my hitherto unknown knowledge to good use.

#24 Ice Queen

Posted 15 December 2012 - 01:26 PM

QUOTE (Holidayromp @ 15/12/2012, 11:05 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
another childless 'expert' opinion  rolleyes.gif ?


Congratulations, you win today's prize for the stupidest EB comment for the day.

I have no idea how being a parent has relevance to having a science or medical degree and studying immunology.

#25 ScarfaceClaw

Posted 15 December 2012 - 01:31 PM

I did a BLW approach and introduced everything all at once. My Dhs family has a strong allergy history, so I did things like nuts and egg during the week, but all around 6 months. No issues with anything.
I feel as tho the cleanliness has a contribution to things like hayfever, as my mil is a vacuum once a day girl and dh has horrific hayfever, where as I was raised in a slightly dustier house, and outside a lot and never once had a sniffle.... It's all totally anecdotal, but I do feel like the rise of the sanitizer has had an impact in some way.




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