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NSW Police officer fined for sexually assaulting Perth woman on danceflooor


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#1 Relish*

Posted 14 December 2012 - 10:31 AM

From the West Australian

http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/break...ex-assault-cop/

Do you think a $7500 fine is ample punishment for a crime like this?  Do you think the outcome would've been different were he not a police officer? Or if the incident had taken place at somewhere other than a nightclub?

I commend the victim for pressing charges in this case,  as I know many who've experienced similar things or worse and not pursued any charges because it seemed pointless.

Edited by Therese, 14 December 2012 - 10:42 AM.
to link the story


#2 Hayleymumof3

Posted 14 December 2012 - 10:48 AM

Do you think a $7500 fine is ample punishment for a crime like this?

No.  He is a POLICE OFFICER he damn well knew what he was doing was WRONG and did it anyway.  He KNEW the consequences of his action but thought he could get away with it.

Do you think the outcome would've been different were he not a police officer?
Yes, I think they are taking into consideration that he MAY be fired and feel sorry for him.  Why he hasn't been fired already is beyond me.

Or if the incident had taken place at somewhere other than a nightclub?

I actually think this is a mitigating factor they were in a nightclub she was in a dress she was asking for it right?(These are not my feelings at all but I am betting this is what people were thinking).

ETA cause I am even more cranky now after reading this bit

QUOTE
Judge Bruce Goetze ordered Sleigh to pay the $7500 fine to his victim, who is the daughter of a serving police officer, to help compensate her for her trauma.


Are the judges so stupid that they think money fixes fecking everything.  No amount of money helps fix the feeling of being violated.


Edited by hayleymumof3, 14 December 2012 - 10:52 AM.


#3 Prioritising Pooks

Posted 14 December 2012 - 11:01 AM

I think the sentencing is reasonable. I would be loathe to jail a cop for something like that, especially considering he has already suffered financially and career-wise and it's a first offense.

#4 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 14 December 2012 - 11:10 AM

I think the sentencing (the fine) is in line with what others get for similar offences. Working in the legal system, from the sentencing ive seen, he seems to have been fined a lot more than other offenders.

I don't think fining is an acceptable sentence for this sort of crime though, to me, it kind of suggests that  the woman is a prostitute who can be bought for the right price.

#5 archyandmehitabel

Posted 14 December 2012 - 11:22 AM

He's a decorated officer, but I'd question how good a cop he really is.  A decoration for whatever service doesn't necessarily mean that you understand what justice and law are really about.  

His being drunk was presented as a mitigating circumstance but I don't buy that.  I've heard of people being Jekyl and Hyde when they drink, but have never actually met anyone this applied to. Nasty drunks I've known were the same person with the inhibitions on socially unacceptable behaviour removed.

He's 45 and his victim was the 22 year old daughter of a fellow police officer.  He's not the policeman you would want to have to talk to about as a woman who had been raped, harassed, or in a case of domestic violence.

ETA probably best he isn't imprisoned, given he is a cop, but defintiely best if he no longer has a job as one.

Edited by archy's mehitabel, 14 December 2012 - 11:24 AM.


#6 CallMeFeral

Posted 14 December 2012 - 11:46 AM

QUOTE (Sunnycat @ 14/12/2012, 12:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't think fining is an acceptable sentence for this sort of crime though, to me, it kind of suggests that  the woman is a prostitute who can be bought for the right price.


I agree with this. I'm not sure what an appropriate sentence would be, but I'd rather see some community service (even better if it's somewhere he can learn about this stuff) or weekend detention etc, than a fine. The idea that money somehow compensates for what she suffered is just a bit gross.
I mean I don't know, from her perspective I suppose maybe she'd rather get money than nothing (if he'd got jail or community service). But I'm not sure she got given that choice. Just the money thing is very distasteful though.

There's a side of me that thinks she only got a conviction because she was a cop's daughter. I bet most of the people who get molested by cops, get intimidated out of pressing charges as the cops close rank around them sad.gif

#7 lynneyours

Posted 14 December 2012 - 11:51 AM

I think the sentencing might reflect this:
She said Sleigh grossly misperceived the situation with the victim. "This was a spontaneous, opportunistic, intoxicated act which ceased the minute it was rejected," she said.

I have been dancing with guys before and had similar happen - which also was them mis-interpreting the situation - and I moved away and avoided them.  I wouldn't have actually ever considered to press charges for being drunkenly groped in a nightclub.  huh.gif  
Which is actually quite a sad statement on how common these things are today.

#8 BetteBoop

Posted 14 December 2012 - 12:13 PM

I don't have an issue with punitive damages being paid to the victim. The same would happen if he punched her.

It's compensation for the suffering he caused. Quantifying emotional distress and assigning it a dollar value is a bizarre notion, but it's applied to many crimes.

I agree that if she wasn't a cop's daughter, it probably would have gone nowhere. But still, it's a reasonable outcome.

#9 Relish*

Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:22 PM

Also this week a woman was sentenced to 9 months in prison for assaulting a police officer - she hit him over the head when he refused to let her back inside a nightclub to fetch her handbag. Seems a much harsher punishment for a far lesser crime. A ridiculous double standard really considering police are the ones who are prepared and trained to deal with violence where most civilians are not.

The downgrading of charges from penetration without consent because of a guilty plea doesn't sit well with me either. Honesty should be expected, not rewarded, by altering the criminal charge - I know it happens all the time and there may well be a reason but I don't get it.

It just seems a more serious offence when the people you expect to protect you are the ones perpetrating, far more serious than a $7,500 fine suggests.

#10 Relish*

Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:24 PM

QUOTE (CallMeAliG @ 14/12/2012, 09:46 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I agree with this. I'm not sure what an appropriate sentence would be, but I'd rather see some community service (even better if it's somewhere he can learn about this stuff) or weekend detention etc, than a fine. The idea that money somehow compensates for what she suffered is just a bit gross.
I mean I don't know, from her perspective I suppose maybe she'd rather get money than nothing (if he'd got jail or community service). But I'm not sure she got given that choice. Just the money thing is very distasteful though.

There's a side of me that thinks she only got a conviction because she was a cop's daughter. I bet most of the people who get molested by cops, get intimidated out of pressing charges as the cops close rank around them sad.gif

I agree with you.




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