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What should I do?
Sons birthday


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30 replies to this topic

#1 amanda1982

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:00 PM

Hi ladies,

Asking opinions on what to do as I am so worried about upsetting someone, and apologies I am sure this has been done before.

My sons 5th birthday is on Saturday, 5-7.30, a disco party hence the lateness of it. All the class are coming and therefore most parents, around 20 with stay.

Now I was the topic starter for you that remember, "parents drinking at school functions", and didn't see a problem with it. Are most people in the same boat that its ok to supply alcoholic drinks at a birthday party. Now I am talking about having a small esky, maybe half a carton and 2 to 3 bottles of champagne for anyone that does want a drink?

I figure its a Saturday evening, xmas season, parents will all be sitting around chatting in our backyard, and there is only a small amount of alcohol available.

We had our Christmas kindy party a few weeks ago on a Sunday afternoon at a park, from what I could see everyone except my husband who doesn't drink were drinking. I am just not sure if its taboo at a 5 year old party.

Thanks

#2 morgansacre

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:08 PM

Everyone has different views. Mine is I hate seeing alcohol at any event that is for children. So Birthday parties, etc. If its for an adult then that's fine. But it wouldn't hurt to be alcohol free for one day.

Lynn

#3 JRA

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:10 PM

I see no problem whatsoever

#4 HeartMyBoys

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:11 PM

I dont see a problem with it. Just say theres some alcaholic beverages for anyone who would like one. I wouldn't be offended at all.

#5 Funwith3

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:13 PM

My husband would be rapt!! I think that given its not really a daytime event, a glass of wine or champagne and a chat with other parents would be a lovely way to spend a few hours. You're not suggesting they get hammered so I don't see a problem.

#6 Funnington

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:22 PM

QUOTE
I am just not sure if its taboo at a 5 year old party.


I don't think it's taboo but, it certainly depends on the audience.  I wouldn't at my son't birthday with a handful of the two-bob snob parents.  I've heard them gossiping about other parents about a wide range of petty things from not being plastered head-to-toe in sunscreen, to someone catching nits to just generally criticising anything that moves (for the sake of it).

I personally wouldn't bat an eye lid at having a civilised glass of wine or beer.  I wouldn't be impressed if the hosts were throwing back a dozen Wild Turkey cans biggrin.gif and playing drinking games!

#7 aprilrainatxmas

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:23 PM

I'm not really keen on alcohol at childrens parties but I would not think badly of hosts if a glass of wine or a beer were offered. Under the legal driving limit sort of thing. I do think you have more control if the host serves it than if people can help themselves.

I have been to childrens parties where hosts have considered byo  large amounts of spirits acceptable.

#8 zande

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:50 PM

Again it appears EB is a parallel universe LOL, in my circles it would be unusual not to offer alcohol at a party like that. That said, I don't know anyone who has a problem with alcohol use, and a glass or 2 of wine or beer is hardly going to cause a problem.

#9 A.K.A

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:51 PM

I think it sounds like a good idea, and I wouldn't be offended to see it at all.



#10 librablonde

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:54 PM

QUOTE (morgansacre @ 11/12/2012, 05:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Everyone has different views. Mine is I hate seeing alcohol at any event that is for children. So Birthday parties, etc. If its for an adult then that's fine. But it wouldn't hurt to be alcohol free for one day.

I agree with this.


#11 Kwyjibo

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:57 PM

QUOTE (HeartMyBoys @ 11/12/2012, 02:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I dont see a problem with it. Just say theres some alcaholic beverages for anyone who would like one. I wouldn't be offended at all.


Agree with this.

#12 overthehill

Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:10 PM

Not a problem over here as long as its not too excess obviously. Sounds rather nice!

#13 PattiODoors

Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:13 PM

QUOTE (HeartMyBoys @ 11/12/2012, 05:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I dont see a problem with it. Just say theres some alcaholic beverages for anyone who would like one. I wouldn't be offended at all.


This is what happens at our children's parties and the parties of my friends kids.
It's pretty much the norm in our social circle.

#14 Frockme

Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:19 PM

Pretty normal and acceptable to cater to all your guests I think.

#15 Cath42

Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:20 PM

I think it's fine! Given that it's a kids' party, and the kids who are there will generally be about 5 years old, nobody's going to drink themselves stupid. People are going to want to be able to drive there and then drive home again. Given the time (5pm until 7:30pm), I'd go one step further and put on a barbecue or a sausage sizzle. That way, whole families can come, have a slap-up dinner, have a beer/glass of wine and then head home. I reckon it'll go down as the kids' party of the year!

#16 Fright bat

Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:21 PM

I'd be more surprised at their not being alcohol for the parents. I have yet to attend a kids birthday party where beer or wine is not offered along with snacks. No one ever has more than one or two so its not like it's a booze fest.

#17 HRH Countrymel

Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:26 PM

If I was at a party, between 5 and 7.30 in the month of December and it was not being held at a teetotal household, I would be shocked if I were not offered a drink and a festive snack!



#18 ~THE~MAGICIAN~

Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:32 PM

I'm not keen on alcohol at kids parties.



#19 TobiasFLK

Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:33 PM

Seeing it is in the evening I don't see a problem at all.

I don't particularly understand why people think it is so inappropriate. I drink caffeine in front of my children daily, if they see me have an occasional glass of wine I don't really see the difference. They are both adult drinks.


#20 ElizabethIAm

Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:35 PM

I don't see a problem with it.i remember my DD's I think 4 or 5th bay at home I offered. Champagne and some of the parents accepted. I don't see it as a it deal.

#21 Imaginary friend

Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:40 PM

I dont see a problem with it either - but having said that, I have been to many childrens' birthday parties where there is not alcohol - wouldnt seem odd if there was none.


I wouldnt be fussed or surprised or upset either way.

#22 ceeshell

Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:50 PM

I think it sounds lovely. I always offer at my children's birthday parties (as long as they are afternoon affairs). Just wine, beer and maybe champagne, hard liquor would be a bit excessive.
Actually, I like a moscato for this purpose, it's a bit sparkly and is a much lower alcohol content than normal wine or champagne. (So festive, but light.)

#23 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:59 PM

we had alcohol for the adults at both DD1 birthday party this year (5) and DD2 (3). Both parties started at 4:30pm, finished around 7pm (so covered dinner time for most people). Some adults drank wine or beer, some stuck to soft drink or water.  Some parents even brought their own bottle of wine to share!

Have been to kids parties where there was no alcohol (mostly mid morning or lunch parties, now that I think about it).  

No big deal either way.  I don't think there is an expectation that alcohol should be served.  Then again, I don't think it's missed if alcohol is not served.  Or maybe that's just my take on it .....  I don't mind either way.

#24 ~~HappyMummy~~

Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:07 PM

I think its perfectly fine to serve alcohol.  I would think it strange if it wasn't.  Enjoy the party.

#25 F.E.B.E

Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:08 PM

QUOTE
If I was at a party, between 5 and 7.30 in the month of December and it was not being held at a teetotal household, I would be shocked if I were not offered a drink and a festive snack!


Same! Can I come? Tounge1.gif




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