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#1 KnightsofNi

Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:19 PM

So I am planning for Christmas day lunch. I don't normally cook it, but this year I am. I am not a cook and am really quite hopeless.

Obviously, one must have gravy with ones Christmas lunch.  tongue.gif But should I make it from scratch? I don't have the foggiest notion of how to do that. Should I just buy one of the Gravox containers with ready made gravy that you just heat and pour out?

Oh, the difficulty that cooking brings!

#2 Cherish

Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:26 PM

I make my gravy using the pan juices and a whisk and
Some plain flour to make a roux, then I add a teaspoon of vegemite and whisk that and the water
From the steamed or boiled veggies until its a gravy consistency.

#3 imamumto3

Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:26 PM

I like gravy made from scratch. I use a Jamie Oliver recipe.

when roasting the  meat, put carrots, celery, parsnip, onions, garlic, rosemary and thyme under it.  when the meat is resting, drain most of the fat out of the pan and then mash up the veggies.  over low heat, add a tablespoon of flour and stir it around.  then add a glass of wine and let it simmer for a couple of minutes.  then add a litre of stock and simmer for 10 minutes.  strain the gravy through a sieve pushing it through the veggies.  I then reheat the gravy for serving.

#4 adl

Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:36 PM

As  above but a tip from Maggie Beer - 20mins simmering to remove the floury taste , gentle heat .....has worked every time

#5 KnightsofNi

Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:42 PM

That all seems so very complicated! How terrible is the ready made gravy do you think?

I tried to convince DH that we should just have a BBQ and salads (I can make salads!!). I can make a mediocre roast, but I fail with all the 'trimmings'.

#6 her mum

Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:42 PM

Do not buy the pre-made liquid sauce in a sachet - they taste really awful.

I would suggest if you do try to make the gravy from scratch that you have a back up. I try often and rarely get it right, and it's far less stressful if you have another option.

As a back up, I recommend the tins of instant gravy where you just need to add boiling water and whisk. Either 'roast meat' or 'chicken' would be lovely with a turkey!

#7 KnightsofNi

Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:54 PM

Can I premake it from scratch and then freeze it to defrost for Christmas Day? It would give me more room for error.

#8 *LucyE*

Posted 08 December 2012 - 11:08 PM

The current issue of Delicious magazine has a Jamie Oliver recipe where you premake the gravy and freeze until needed.  It takes the stress from the day when all you have to do is reheat the very tasty gravy.

#9 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 09 December 2012 - 05:39 AM

QUOTE (*LucyE* @ 09/12/2012, 12:08 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The current issue of Delicious magazine has a Jamie Oliver recipe where you premake the gravy and freeze until needed.  It takes the stress from the day when all you have to do is reheat the very tasty gravy.

Ooh thanks for this! To be able to reheat pre- homemade gravy on the day would be great!  I imagine you could then also add the pan juices from the roast for some extra oomph ...I'm not a fan of instant gravy mixes personally, I think they can taste a bit......chemical....?

#10 Shanski

Posted 09 December 2012 - 06:46 AM

If you do want a really nice tasting instant gravy try Greens Gravy Granules (either roast meat or roast chicken)
You can get it at Woolies and its is a really nice tasting instant gravy - just mix with boiling water and its ready to serve.

Otherwise my recipe for gravy from scratch is to
- take the pan drippings and add stock powder (chicken stock powder for chicken, pork or lamb and beef stock powder for beef)
- then add plain flour (no exact measurement as we LOVE gravy so I always make a huge amount)
- mix this together to form a paste, making sure to scrape all the sticky brown bits off the pan
- slowly add water to thin it out then transfer to saucepan and continue stirring until boiling and thick (keep adding water if it gets too thick)


#11 jemsoli

Posted 09 December 2012 - 06:51 AM

i also reccommend the greens gravy, but if you go to franklins you can buy it in a tin of POWDER and it is SO much nicer than the granules, for some reason coles or woolies only sell the granules. it is rich and really yummy, but then i havent had real gravy in a long long time.

#12 pinkelephant

Posted 09 December 2012 - 07:27 AM

If you are cooking a turkey I will pre-make some stock so basically cook some chicken necks/bones in water with an onion. Strain the soup into a container and freeze.

I remove the turkey from the cooking pan and place the pan on the stove. I pour the (defrosted) pre-made stock into the pan and heat and stir.  In a separate bowl whisk some plain flour with water and add gradually and watch the sauce thicken.  You wont know how much flour/water mix u need so just add a bit at a time and see if the sauce is thick enough. Generally 2-3 cups is plenty.

If you taste the gravy and it needs more flavour throw in a chicken stock cube and dont forget to add salt.  For a more creamy version you can put in a  teaspoon of sour cream.

For a beef gravy i put water in the pan juices, some beef stock, salt & tiny bit of vegemite if the flavour isnt strong enough. You could also use mushrooms,onion and red wine if you wanted to be fancy.

Maybe cook a small roast one night this week and give it a test run! If u are doing turkey then practice makin gravy with a roast chicken-- much cheaper

Oh and for chicken stock cubes/ powder I use the aldi one- much nicer than the ones at woollies. Makes a nicer flavour sauce

#13 Mamabear2010

Posted 09 December 2012 - 07:38 AM

We always use gravox powder for our gravy. Homemade is probably nicer, but gravox is simple and tasty.

Given you're not a cook, make it easy for yourself. Focus on getting the meat and veggies right and just use gravox with pan juices mixed in.

#14 Funnington

Posted 09 December 2012 - 01:35 PM

I make my own gravy depending on the type of meat.  Roast beef is the only meat I will make my own.  Basically I put the joint, salt & pepper it and pour in water (about 1/2 way up the roasting tray).  Then, I slow cook for about an hour - you may need to keep topping up the water as it evaporates.  Pour the liquid into a jug and save for the gravy.

I then just use gravox to thicken the liquid into our preferred consistency - not too thin, not to thick.

You can make gravy from lamb and pork, but you'd need to faff about separating the fat.  

I really like gravox.  If you're not confident (or can't be bothered) making gravy from meat juices, mixing the gravy with the water you have boiled or steamed your vegies in makes a great flavour too (especially cabbage and pea water).

Edited by Funnington, 09 December 2012 - 01:36 PM.


#15 JLC

Posted 09 December 2012 - 02:58 PM

I do make my own gravy most of the time, but always have the Greens Gravy Granules in my cupboard, its tastes good & is smooth everytime.

#16 Glr-r

Posted 09 December 2012 - 04:27 PM

I would use gravox but not the ready made stuff.

Just put the directed amount of gravox and water on the stove and whisk until bubbling them turn down and let simmer for a bit.

http://www.jamieoliver.com/magazine/recipe...get-ahead-gravy

#17 elliebear

Posted 09 December 2012 - 06:29 PM

Do you think yo could premake that Jamie Olive recipe then just heat it up without the turkey juices?

I'm planning on getting DH to cook the turkey in the Weber not sure if I will get the juices but sounds like it might be tasty enough as it is

#18 *LucyE*

Posted 09 December 2012 - 11:52 PM

QUOTE
Do you think yo could premake that Jamie Olive recipe then just heat it up without the turkey juices?

Sure.

#19 Airene

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:18 PM

If I want gravy but not something complicated here's what I do:

Heat 1 1/2 tbsp of fat drippings and 480 ml broth in a saucepan over medium heat until hot.

In a small bowl, mix together 1 1/2 tbsp cornstarch and 60 ml cold water and then add to the pan. Add thyme, rosemary, etc as desired. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wire whisk to avoid any lumps. Boil for a minute and then season with salt and pepper.

To make it creamy you can dissolve the cornstarch in milk, not water.




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