Jump to content

Career Change - Primary School teacher


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 KerryL

Posted 06 December 2012 - 02:56 PM

Hi All

Looking for some help and guidance here. Since having my little one 7 months ago the thought of going back to my current profession in Human Resources is no longer attractive to me and I am seriously giving some thought to going back to uni to complete my diploma in education to be a primary school teacher. I was wondering if there are any teachers out there who could provide me with guidance on what it is like working in your profession, what do you find most rewarding and frustrating, what are the propects like for someone entering the profession who would be 35 year + would it be frowned upon?

Thanking you in advance

Kerry

#2 boatiebabe

Posted 06 December 2012 - 03:00 PM

Depending on which state you are in you could contact the Education Department.

There are quite a few programs (and scholarships etc) for people in other industries who want to retrain to become teachers. They could give you some information. Certainly they do not frown upon it!

#3 hiddensecrets

Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:06 PM

QUOTE (KerryL @ 06/12/2012, 12:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi All

Looking for some help and guidance here. Since having my little one 7 months ago the thought of going back to my current profession in Human Resources is no longer attractive to me and I am seriously giving some thought to going back to uni to complete my diploma in education to be a primary school teacher. I was wondering if there are any teachers out there who could provide me with guidance on what it is like working in your profession, what do you find most rewarding and frustrating, what are the propects like for someone entering the profession who would be 35 year + would it be frowned upon?

Thanking you in advance

Kerry


Kerry if you do an EB search a lot of teacher threads are already around.  However, my ex was a teacher so I can answer some of your questions (I also did one year of teaching degree before giving up):

You would not be frowned upon being 35+....many people in my ex's grad dip class were late thirties to early forties.  This is not uncommon!!

The ex said the hardest part about teaching was planning for 28 odd children that all had different needs (curriculum differentiation).  You had to always modify your plans because little Johnny and Suzie needed something different to Harry.  You have to make sure that all special needs (gifted and disabilities) are catered for.

With the old curriculum framework it was testing to ensure that what you wanted to teach matched with the overarching outcomes, and then ensured that they match learning area outcomes and then progress map indicators. In saying that I am not sure what the new curriculum would be like, but this is time consuming.  I know many EB posters say that you could reuse lesson plans once they are set in stone, but with curriculum differentiation this is not always the case.....plus not all lessons "reach" your kids.

Reporting is very time consuming and has to be individualised and done to a set standard for DETWA.  While ex was reporting I think we saw him from about 4pm until 5pm when he got home and had a quick bite to eat and then he went back to reporting until about 11pm.  This went on for about 2-3 weeks.  

The parents.....being called because Johnny didnt get the best marks, or because you told Minnie off or something she most certainly could not have done, or why are you not teaching Harry how to multiply even though he is only in kindergarten and its the first day.....some of the calls ex had was a doozy!!! (kind of amusing really). So you really have to be able to deal with a diversity of people.

The other thing I was told (Even by the universities) that if you do not want to go ANYWHERE, it is hard to get a contract.  Some of the new graduates that ex and I knew also found it hard getting into relief work because many schools had their preferred people.

In saying that if you feel called towards it then you would be fine original.gif this is just going off my ex's experience....



#4 hiddensecrets

Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:06 PM

DP

Edited by hiddensecrets, 06 December 2012 - 07:13 PM.


#5 Expelliarmus

Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:08 PM

I was 36 when I started teaching.

#6 mmuc83

Posted 07 December 2012 - 04:45 PM

QUOTE (howdo @ 06/12/2012, 08:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I was 36 when I started teaching.


And how have you found it?  Primary Teaching? Do you still enjoy it?

Sorry to hijack OP, but i am interested in this also..

#7 Kalota

Posted 07 December 2012 - 05:18 PM

Hi OP, I am a primary school teacher and it was not my first degree (I went back to study it after completing a journalism degree previously!)

I absolutely love teaching, it is very rewarding and keeps you on your toes! Having said that though, I do not have kids yet and I don't think I could do this job with a family - it's way too intense. Generally, I get to school at about 7:45am and usually don't get to leave until a about 5 or 6pm. There is lots of take-home work as well - I spend a good portion of the weekend and weekday evenings doing schoolwork. The past few years I've been in the Prep year level which is also exhausting, especially at the beginning of the year when the students can be quite needy/demanding throughout the day.

Of course, this is my own personal experience from my particular school that I work at (which IS a difficult school due to the SES of the area). But, even though I absolutely LOVE my job, when I have a family I think I'm either going to have the leave the profession, find a part-time teaching position, or find a school that is less demanding! My current hours and workload is NOT family friendly at all.

I do love it though, it is so rewarding building relationships with children and seeing them grow and learn. They always brighten your day as well! The holidays are also good - if I'm not catching up on work or attending professional development!

ETA: When I went back to complete a teaching qualification I was still in my twenties, BUT there were loads of people aged 35 to 50 in the course! I don't think it would be frowned upon at all.

Edited by Kalota, 07 December 2012 - 05:19 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

How dare anyone accuse a mum of 'milking' a miscarriage

A heartless comment from a stranger shocked the already devastated radio host Em Rusciano.

How breast milk can help relieve your baby's teething pain

Try one mum's simple parenting hack to ease your baby's discomfort.

Top 10 common health myths busted

To help combat the misinformation and spread good health, here are the most common health myths compared to fact.

How to make flying with a toddler more bearable

After almost three years of living in Canada, it was time to pack our bags, bundle up our three children (including our two and a half year old Toddler) and pray to the heavens above, before flying to Aussie Land to see our family and friends.

Breastfeeding may help with caesarean pain, says new study

Breastfeeding after a caesarean section may help manage persistent pain, finds new research on the post-birth experience of new mothers.

Recall notice: fourth cot recalled in less than one month

A recall notice has been issued for yet another cot sold in Australia -the White New Zealand Pine 3-in-1 Baby Sleigh Cot Bed with Drawers.

A baby girl, a baffling disease - and the only way to help her is to hurt her

Every morning, Kevin Federici pulls on a head lamp, sterilises a sewing needle and prepares to prick his baby girl all over her tiny body.

If you make your own baby food you'll love this Instagram account

Tired of making carrot purée? Take a look at this mum's homemade baby food creations.

The unique baby names literally no one is choosing

After a unique baby name for your little one? Here are the monikers no one chose in 2016.

'It's such a boost': mum receives 'thanks for breastfeeding in public' card

It was the boost one mum needed at just the right time.

The volunteers who cuddle sick babies when parents can't

Kerry Abbott is a "cuddler" at the hospital - one a a group of volunteers who take turns holding hospitalised babies in neonatal intensive care.

'I refused to be ashamed for putting a leash on my child'

To leash or not to leash, that is the question. And it's certainly a divisive one at that.

Chewing gum could help with caesarean section recovery

Packing your hospital bag to have a baby? Then you must add one more item to the list – chewing gum.

Sharing makes young children happy - just don't force them

There are many emotional benefits to sharing, but only if it's voluntary.

We were making plans for our empty nest, then we got pregnant

Just days before our oldest child turned 17, I started feeling ill. I thought it was the flu, but there was something vaguely familiar about this illness.

5 ways to a healthy pregnancy

An easy pregnancy that results in a healthy baby: that's the dream.

Backlash for Woolworths after store locks up pregnancy tests

When Victorian resident Ellie Blackwood saw how her local Woolworths' was selling pregnancy tests, she turned to their Facebook page to lodge a complaint.

 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Articles

Advertisement
 
 
 

From our network

Mum tips to keep your pre-baby budget in check

Money might be funny in a rich man's world (or so ABBA told us), but for the rest of us it's a major consideration – particularly before having a baby.

5 easy ways to make your maternity leave last longer

Maternity leave is a special time for you, your partner and your new little bundle. The last thing you want is for financial worries to stand in the way of that joy.

10 ways to keep your 'buying for baby' costs down

Becoming a parent is full of surprises – not least of all finding out that, for such small beings, babies cause a lot of chaos and expense.

5 ways to prepare to go from two incomes to one

Here are some ideas for getting that budget in shape, ready for being a one income family.

 

Baby Names

Need some ideas?

See what names are trending this year.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.