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School? Mediocrity?


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#1 pencil

Posted 05 December 2012 - 09:38 PM

I think our older children's high school sucks. I think the electives are largely stupid, the required classes not particularly great, and the teachers fairly useless.

That is what I think. But the school itself thinks they are great. They talk about parent/teacher communication, notifying parents if there are any concerns, stopping bullying in it's tracks, a personalised education, blah, blah, blah.

My SD gets back a paper with a Well Done! on it. It's a end of year revision in which she has hardly answered many of the questions, spelled almost every single word wrong, got a final score of 51/100, and it's a big scrawly mess. Pretty much all her work is of this standard. I have asked the school time, and time again, for extra help for her, told them of her frustration at 'not getting' the work, etc. All met with platitudes, assurances, garbage.

Am I wrong here? Is a Well Done! appropriate for a paper of this standard? Are Great Work!s acceptable on incorrect, misspelled English papers? Is sitting in front of me and my child at an interview and saying "She is going great, no problems, great work all round" okay, when obviously the child has really low quality work, and very basic skills considering her age?

Am I expecting miracles when the school is satisfied thrilled with mediocrity?

I can't even be bothered typing about the dramas we have had with my older child. Let's just say that I am considering switching schools for her. Is it worth my time and money? She hates school. I can't imagine any other school close enough will be much better then her current one, and due to freaking Facebook she won't even be having a 'clean slate' because she has ties to kids in pretty much every neighbouring suburb.

I'm just so, so disappointed. I can't get these guys into any better schools because they simply don't have any extra skills to get in. My next two due for high school will definitely be going to better schools, they are academically minded, and are cultivating extra skills as well. So long as they stay motivated while the kids around them are praised for mediocrity.

#2 kadoodle

Posted 05 December 2012 - 10:06 PM

Is she old enough for TAFE?  How about a apprenticeship or gap year? What does she want to do?  School isn't the be all and end all.  If she's wasting her own and everyone else's time by being there, maybe it's time for a change of direction?

#3 leisamd

Posted 06 December 2012 - 05:01 AM

That sounds incredibly frustrating pencil!

I agree with kadoodle, if it IS broke(n)...

You could also look into homeschooling.

#4 Melidia

Posted 06 December 2012 - 05:12 AM

QUOTE
I have asked the school time, and time again, for extra help for her, told them of her frustration at 'not getting' the work, etc.


Have you considered the possibility that like many schools in Australia, they are already stretched to the limit resource-wise?   Perhaps they cannot offer any extra help for her as there are too many other students there whose needs are much greater and their support staff are already over-extended.

Perhaps you could try supporting her education by helping her yourself where you can, or hiring a tutor.

#5 Crinkle cut

Posted 06 December 2012 - 05:55 AM

pencil - NO, it is not acceptable, and you shouldn't have to pull her out or accept a sub standard education.  Nor should you have to pay for private tutoring. But in reality you may have to.  The quality free education ideal seems to be a thing of the past.  :-(


#6 Crinkle cut

Posted 06 December 2012 - 06:06 AM

Actually Pencil, I just wanted to add something.  Is it possible the school is telling her it's great work and you are told she's doing well because she is improving and working to the best of her ability?  I just ask because my son recieved glowing praise by his class teacher and learning enhancement teacher for just scraping in a sound and low achievements in reading and writing.  However, I know this is in light of his Low and very low acheivements last year. He has always had excellent behaviour and attention span, so he is always praised for that, but the fact he covered so much ground this year was worth praising, even if he is not quite 'up to standard'.  

I guess I am saying it may depend on the context.

#7 Crinkle cut

Posted 06 December 2012 - 06:17 AM

QUOTE (Mo2k @ 06/12/2012, 06:13 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A a family gathering my nephew came in and showed granny his report card. It was all 'C's and when granny nicely queried what happened to all of his 'B's from last time. He said "Oh I didn't get any this time but my teacher told me this is exactly where I should be".  What the?! That's not the response I would have got!



Actually, the teacher is correct with the new way of grading students.  It is exactly where he is supposed to be (I'm not sure our school has started this yet).  That does not mean he can not achieve higher though if he is very smart and can apply his knowledge in unfamiliar situations.

I don't think it's too much different from when we were kids an an A meant you were exceptional in that area of study, only a few kids got them and the majority were c, or 'average'.  Something had to be done about whole classes al receiving all A's and B's.  They can't all be exceptional??

Edited by ~maryanne~, 06 December 2012 - 06:22 AM.


#8 Niamh23

Posted 06 December 2012 - 06:27 AM

Exactly. A C grade means that they are meeting the achievement standards for their year level. Anything higher means that they are going beyond the requirements.

#9 librablonde

Posted 06 December 2012 - 06:37 AM

QUOTE (Grey @ 06/12/2012, 06:12 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Have you considered the possibility that like many schools in Australia, they are already stretched to the limit resource-wise?   Perhaps they cannot offer any extra help for her as there are too many other students there whose needs are much greater and their support staff are already over-extended.
Perhaps you could try supporting her education by helping her yourself where you can, or hiring a tutor.

OP, I totally understand your frustration b/c that's how I'm feeling right now with my DD's school and their idea of what is acceptable education-wise. I don't like the new grading system at all and the aim to have most kids achieving a C ( I know there's been a ton of EB debate about this so I won't continue it again). I agree with Grey and her comments, though. As I know my school currently provides a very mediocre level of education, I think it's now up to parents to provide even more additional education at home via learning websites and tutors. It's crappy but probably going to become a reality for those parents like me who can't change schools (due to travel distances).

#10 Dowager fancie

Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:08 AM

QUOTE (Mo2k @ 06/12/2012, 07:53 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I know what you mean, it's more the fact that his grades have consistently been slipping. I understand that not all can achieve A's & B's but when this is what you're used to doing surely the fact that grades are slipping should be looked at? I don't mean in a nasty way, but just at least have a look at why this could happen?


But are his grades really slipping or is it just a case of gradings being re-named i.e. the standard that would have once resulted in a B grade is now called C grade - standard is the same just the name is different.

#11 eachschoolholidays

Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:27 AM

QUOTE (pencil @ 05/12/2012, 10:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I think our older children's high school sucks. I think the electives are largely stupid, the required classes not particularly great, and the teachers fairly useless.

That is what I think. But the school itself thinks they are great. They talk about parent/teacher communication, notifying parents if there are any concerns, stopping bullying in it's tracks, a personalised education, blah, blah, blah.

My SD gets back a paper with a Well Done! on it. It's a end of year revision in which she has hardly answered many of the questions, spelled almost every single word wrong, got a final score of 51/100, and it's a big scrawly mess. Pretty much all her work is of this standard. I have asked the school time, and time again, for extra help for her, told them of her frustration at 'not getting' the work, etc. All met with platitudes, assurances, garbage.

Am I wrong here? Is a Well Done! appropriate for a paper of this standard? Are Great Work!s acceptable on incorrect, misspelled English papers? Is sitting in front of me and my child at an interview and saying "She is going great, no problems, great work all round" okay, when obviously the child has really low quality work, and very basic skills considering her age?

Am I expecting miracles when the school is satisfied thrilled with mediocrity?

I can't even be bothered typing about the dramas we have had with my older child. Let's just say that I am considering switching schools for her. Is it worth my time and money? She hates school. I can't imagine any other school close enough will be much better then her current one, and due to freaking Facebook she won't even be having a 'clean slate' because she has ties to kids in pretty much every neighbouring suburb.

I'm just so, so disappointed. I can't get these guys into any better schools because they simply don't have any extra skills to get in. My next two due for high school will definitely be going to better schools, they are academically minded, and are cultivating extra skills as well. So long as they stay motivated while the kids around them are praised for mediocrity.


I have a couple of reactions to your post:

1.  The electives are 'stupid'.  Core electives don't normally change a lot. Some schools will have some specialist teachers that will enable them to offer above and beyond, but generally electives remain the same.

2.  The are lots of reasons why a teacher would only right well done on a paper.  Perhaps they did peer marking afterwards and your child didn't/ would participate?  Perhaps this is better than you child has been doing?  

3. How is it news to you that your child can't spell??  Is this the first piece of worn you have seen in the last 5 years?  

4.  What is your role in your child's education?  None of your post suggests you are really engaged with with your child is doing, otherwise none of this would be a shock to you.

5. Extra help- what kind of extra help are you envisaging?  Children with diagnosed disabilities struggle to get sufficient aid in the classroom, unless you have a formal diagnosis, you are not likely to get any extra help.

6.  If the issue is the inadequacies of the teaching, and I'm not actually convinced it is, why is a 'clean slate' necessary?

#12 Crinkle cut

Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:38 AM

I have to say, I am constantly frustrated by the idea it is up to parents to educate their kids on the basics - spelling, reading, maths.  What is the school for if not to provide basic education?  Why is it acceptable for schools to put a child in the 'too hard basket'?  

Teachers study for years to learn how to teach, but parents get a half hour how to seminar and are expected to do the job themselves?

ETA:  This is not a dig at teachers, but at an underfunded system that is failing so many kids.

Edited by ~maryanne~, 06 December 2012 - 07:42 AM.


#13 archythepeasant

Posted 06 December 2012 - 09:36 AM

QUOTE (Mo2k @ 06/12/2012, 07:53 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I know what you mean, it's more the fact that his grades have consistently been slipping. I understand that not all can achieve A's & B's but when this is what you're used to doing surely the fact that grades are slipping should be looked at? I don't mean in a nasty way, but just at least have a look at why this could happen?


'C' doesn't mean his grades are slipping.  'C' is the standard given unless the student is outstanding.  'C' now means within a wide range of normal, not within a narrow band of marking, so kids who get 85% will still get a 'C', meaning 'at the standard expected at this time of year'', as will kids who get 65% .  The difference is the detail given in the child's report.  That should tell you whether the child is working to potential or not.  I dislike this wide range marking system, but that's a whole other argument.

QUOTE (nlman @ 06/12/2012, 08:27 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have a couple of reactions to your post:

3. How is it news to you that your child can't spell??  Is this the first piece of worn you have seen in the last 5 years?  

4.  What is your role in your child's education?  None of your post suggests you are really engaged with with your child is doing, otherwise none of this would be a shock to you.

5. Extra help- what kind of extra help are you envisaging?  Children with diagnosed disabilities struggle to get sufficient aid in the classroom, unless you have a formal diagnosis, you are not likely to get any extra help.

6.  If the issue is the inadequacies of the teaching, and I'm not actually convinced it is, why is a 'clean slate' necessary?


I think it's unfair to argue that the OP has suddenly discovered that her SD is having trouble, or suddenly decided the school is no good.  She says that she has spoken to the school 'time and time again' and also that she has had previous trouble about an older child.

It is fair to ask what help at home the child is getting, and not expecting the school to do it all.  Just last night the news had a story about kids doing better when their parents are actively involved.

OTOH, it's fair as a parent to expect that the school and teachers will support you and listen to your concerns.  DS2 struggled in year 7 in some subjects and when we brought it up at parent-teacher interviews his teacher, who taught all 3 of these subjects, assured us he was doing fine, right in the middle and not to worry.  We worked with him regularly at his homework and knew that he was worrying about it and feeling frustrated.  His understanding of the topics and concepts was far from solid, insufficient to build on and he was starting to fall behind, though his marks did not yet reflect this.  Because he wasn't obviously failing she brushed our concern aside.  We were really frustrated and angry that she refused to take what we said seriously.  Asking a teacher to keep an eye on how you child is going in class, or a student asking a teacher to explain something after class on occasion isn't demanding an aide or special treatment, or extensive private lessons.  It's part of the job and teachers who are any good are happy to help if they can.

#14 pencil

Posted 06 December 2012 - 09:37 AM

QUOTE
1.  The electives are 'stupid'.  Core electives don't normally change a  lot. Some schools will have some specialist teachers that will enable  them to offer above and beyond, but generally electives remain the same.

2.   The are lots of reasons why a teacher would only right well done on a  paper.  Perhaps they did peer marking afterwards and your child didn't/  would participate?  Perhaps this is better than you child has been  doing?  

3. How is it news to you that your child can't spell??  Is this the first piece of worn you have seen in the last 5 years?  

4.   What is your role in your child's education?  None of your post  suggests you are really engaged with with your child is doing, otherwise  none of this would be a shock to you.

5. Extra help- what kind  of extra help are you envisaging?  Children with diagnosed disabilities  struggle to get sufficient aid in the classroom, unless you have a  formal diagnosis, you are not likely to get any extra help.

6.  If the issue is the inadequacies of the teaching, and I'm not actually convinced it is, why is a 'clean slate' necessary?


No, the electives are ridiculous things, like party food, sewing gifts. I cant' even recall half the others. One looked good, I am making both kids take that.

Definitely not better, child is capable but has not put in the effort. Usually due to attention level in my opinion.

Not new, been trying to tell the school/s for years now. Constantly met with 'Doing fine!'s

I had a program set up at home, spent an hour or so a day with child, saw no improvement, received no support form other parents (this is my SD) and child started to say "But the teachers say I'm doing fine"

Admittance into the groups apparently available for the kids who are behind, such as quicksmart.

The last part of my post was about my older child, who has struggled with bullying, and little support from the school, been told it's her fault, etc.

#15 Melidia

Posted 06 December 2012 - 09:47 AM

QUOTE
Exactly. A C grade means that they are meeting the achievement standards for their year level. Anything higher means that they are going beyond the requirements.


That is correct.  The 'achievement standards' are actually the outcomes that are listed in the syllabus for each subject.

If a child is achieving B's and A's one year, then C's the next, chances are they have moved up to the next stage or set of outcomes, and are achieving at the required level for that particular point in time.  If they are high achievers, then by the end of their time in that stage they should be up at the B/A level again.


QUOTE
I have to say, I am constantly frustrated by the idea it is up to parents to educate their kids on the basics - spelling, reading, maths. What is the school for if not to provide basic education? Why is it acceptable for schools to put a child in the 'too hard basket'?

Teachers study for years to learn how to teach, but parents get a half hour how to seminar and are expected to do the job themselves?


No one expects parents to educate their kids on the basics, but we do expect you to support what the teacher is doing.  The reality is that so much has been stuffed into the curriculum in schools that it is virtually impossible to spend enough time covering the basics thoroughly any more.  Don't like it?  Then let your MP's know.  The teachers do not get to pick and choose what to teach - they are mandated to teach the curriculum as provided to them by the government or educational body that is responsible for curriculum in each state.  

Personally, I would much rather leave things like bike education, road safety, drug education, sex education, sport etc etc etc up to the parents to teach their children, which is what you should be doing.  In reality though, there are too many parents not doing their job properly, which is why this stuff ends up in schools.  

Every time there is a problem with kids, the first thing that is said in the media is "Why don't they teach kids about this in schools?"  There aren't enough hours in the day to cover everything that everyone thinks teachers should be teaching.

QUOTE
Definitely not better, child is capable but has not put in the effort. Usually due to attention level in my opinion.


How is that the school's fault?  OP, instead of complaining about the fact that the teachers aren't doing enough to help your child, try looking at the bigger picture and finding some solutions that involve you actually doing something to help.  It would make the world of difference to your child.

Edited by Grey, 06 December 2012 - 09:48 AM.


#16 Crinkle cut

Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:01 AM

QUOTE (Grey @ 06/12/2012, 09:47 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That is correct.  The 'achievement standards' are actually the outcomes that are listed in the syllabus for each subject.

If a child is achieving B's and A's one year, then C's the next, chances are they have moved up to the next stage or set of outcomes, and are achieving at the required level for that particular point in time.  If they are high achievers, then by the end of their time in that stage they should be up at the B/A level again.




No one expects parents to educate their kids on the basics, but we do expect you to support what the teacher is doing.  The reality is that so much has been stuffed into the curriculum in schools that it is virtually impossible to spend enough time covering the basics thoroughly any more.  Don't like it?  Then let your MP's know.  The teachers do not get to pick and choose what to teach - they are mandated to teach the curriculum as provided to them by the government or educational body that is responsible for curriculum in each state.  

Personally, I would much rather leave things like bike education, road safety, drug education, sex education, sport etc etc etc up to the parents to teach their children, which is what you should be doing.  In reality though, there are too many parents not doing their job properly, which is why this stuff ends up in schools.  

Every time there is a problem with kids, the first thing that is said in the media is "Why don't they teach kids about this in schools?"  There aren't enough hours in the day to cover everything that everyone thinks teachers should be teaching.



How is that the school's fault?  OP, instead of complaining about the fact that the teachers aren't doing enough to help your child, try looking at the bigger picture and finding some solutions that involve you actually doing something to help.  It would make the world of difference to your child.



Oh, so we are actually agreeing that enough time is not spent on the basics but it is not the teachers fault?  I have pointed out in my post that it is to do with the system not the teachers.  You cut that out of the quote though :-).

And you may not think that parents are left to cover the basics, but when spelling, reading and sight words are all mostly done at home I consider that a huge chunk of the basics.  IMO it should be the other way round - learnt at school and practised at home, not learnt and practised at home and practised at school if and when time allows.

It is all well and good to say parents need to do this that and the other thing, but it's the child who misses out on the education that state education is theoretically supposed to provide to every child, not just the ones who's parents are actively engaged with the school or who can afford private schools and tutors.

Ideally it'd be great if all parents had the skills and patience to advocate for and teach their kids.  Reality is, many don't (myself included) - which is why we have schools in the first place rather than having everyone home school.

Edited by ~maryanne~, 06 December 2012 - 10:07 AM.


#17 Froger

Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:09 AM

Sounds like they are ordinary kids, at an ordinary school, doing ordinary work. Just like most kids. Not every child is a genius. Sometimes as parents we have to face the facts that our children actually are just mediocre, at least in some areas.

You said yourself that your kids can't get into better schools as they don't have any extra skills. I'm not really sure what you expect the school to do? Schools can't work magic and create a genius out of a mediocre child when the funds and the support are just not there.

Edited by SarahM72, 06 December 2012 - 10:09 AM.


#18 Floral Arrangement

Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:16 AM

I have none of your complaints about my older children's highschool. I had teacher's contact me and come in to school over the last holidays to get my daughter over the line with year 12 (she is a little too laid back). I have teachers call me or ask me to come in if there is the smallest concern, they let nothing get out of hand. I am seeing DD1 get her year 12 and eligibility for University and DD2 in the top 1% of the school due to her effort and supportive teachers. They are both smart but not geniuses.

I would look at TAFE or a school that specialises in the last couple of years of school. Like this school in Adelaide.

Senior college

We discuss our children's work and guide them and always have done. We are strict on not doing the work for them at all but assisting them in getting the required result.


Edited by FloralArrangement, 06 December 2012 - 10:29 AM.


#19 Crinkle cut

Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:17 AM

QUOTE (*magenta* @ 06/12/2012, 10:00 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This annoys me so much.

Teachers are PAID a decent salary to teach.

If parents are supposed to pick up the slack, what happens to the kids whose parents are illiterate, whose parents are dealing with addiction issues/domestic violence/housing instability/mental health problems/chronic health issues?

Those kids just slip further and further behind.

It is totally inequitable to expect parents to fill in the gaps that teachers miss.

Look outside your middle class world.



Exactly what I was trying to say - thanks Magenta!

Edited by ~maryanne~, 06 December 2012 - 10:19 AM.


#20 pencil

Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:28 AM

QUOTE
How is that the school's fault?  OP, instead of complaining about the  fact that the teachers aren't doing enough to help your child, try  looking at the bigger picture and finding some solutions that involve  you actually doing something to help.  It would make the world of  difference to your child.
  How many times am I going to bash my head into a brick wall? I have spent a lot of time helping this child. But the school says she's doing fine, sometimes they even say doing great. Then the child says why should she try harder? The school says she's great. Then the other parents won't commit to help. Legally I can't go the diagnoses route, so my hands are tied. I express all this to the school and quite frankly they don't care.

QUOTE
Sounds like they are ordinary kids, at an  ordinary school, doing ordinary work. Just like most kids. Not every  child is a genius. Sometimes as parents we have to face the facts that  our children actually are just mediocre, at least in some areas.
I'm happy to accept that, obviously with six kids I can see the natural difference in each child's ability. BUT I am well aware of their abilities and they are not achieving those. My oldest child hands in her math homework, half completed and the teacher says "That's fine"? The younger one can't spell words like want, and the teacher says her literacy levels are fine. What more can I do? I'm fighting a battle that I'm the only witness to. Besides, average would be fine, but my SD in particular has skills below those of my 7 yr old. That's not average, that's crap. And for the school to say it's good makes me think the school has pretty low expectations. No way am I sending my overachievers to a school that thinks crap work is good.

To clear up confusion, I cannot switch my SDs school, while I could probably make it happen, I simply don't have the fight in me at this point in time, so I am only looking at swapping my older DD.

Lastly, the child I am considering switching has had bullying issues. That's the main reason why I want to switch her. She's never going to be an academic, probably won't go to Uni. or any further education and I'm cool with that, but I need her to at least have some happiness and self esteem. I'm just worried we will swap her and the next school will have the same lines - Bullying is not tolerated - Personalised education - blah blah blah. - but not actually do anything to achieve these ideals.

Finally, lol, this is a fairly small school. In fact I chose it deliberately because it is a small school who emphasised the individual attention factor. We have less than 150 students. Perhaps a larger school is actually better? She can 'hide out' as well as perhaps have access to better programs due to greater funding? I don't know.

#21 pencil

Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:32 AM

QUOTE
I have none of your complaints about my older children's highschool. I  had teacher's contact me and come in to school over the last holidays to  get my daughter over the line with year 12 (she is a little too laid  back). I have teachers call me or ask me to come in if there is the  smallest concern, they let nothing get out of hand. I am seeing DD1 get  her year 12 and eligibility for University and DD2 in the top 1% of the  school due to her effort and supportive teachers. They are both smart  but not geniuses.

I would look at TAFE or a school that specialises in the last couple of years of school. Like this school in Adelaide.
Thank you, that was what I was hoping to hear. That there are schools out there that actually do deliver on their promises. I have only ever been contacted when a child is unwell and needs to come home, and once when oldest child had a behaviour drama due to build up of frustration over bullying. NEVER about their work.

TAFE is out for now. Not quite at the age level. It is my plan for the future however.

#22 Floral Arrangement

Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:35 AM

QUOTE
Perhaps a larger school is actually better? She can 'hide out' as well as perhaps have access to better programs due to greater funding? I don't know.


Our dd's high school has 1000 students due to go up to 1200+ due to residential growth in the area. They do get good funding and have good programs in place. A lot of the private schools send their students to this school to attend VET programs. My 2 daughters both found their niche's easily. I would look at TAFE or the College (of course similar close to you) I linked if your child is not academically inclined finding a course that interests them may help.

In Adelaide their are some school's that do 10, 11 and 12 maybe look and see if similar is around you.

Edited by FloralArrangement, 06 December 2012 - 10:37 AM.


#23 steppy

Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:52 AM

I have had similar experiences and have no faith in the current school system methodology and curriculum at all. Like you, I was continuously amazed by the schools being thrilled with a barely passing mark and their complete lack of interest in imparting decent math or English skills to their students. It wasn't just the school though, it's everyone. It's pretty much at the point where you say "Well, he/she just scraped through by the skin of their teeth - I'm a bit disappointed" and the school and every single other person says something flippant like "Oh well at least he/she is not on drugs". Huh?  Has about the same effect as when your kid is doing really well but you keep saying "Yes, it's great that you got an A but it's not an A plus is it?" Useless unhelpful comments.

My teen just did a year of school (Year 11), didn't hand in a single piece of satisfactory work and was told they would fail the year, and then the teacher did a pity run and allowed teen to submit all their work after term ended at a very low quality. Pass! Same result as all the other kids who worked all year. I know which kid was the smartest - the one who did nothing and got away with no visible consequences yet again. We can talk until we are blue in the face but when you are rewarded for doing nothing much at all, you just tune out all that 'blah blah wait until you are in the real world'. Good system! At least it explains why all the new young workers we get are so useless we have to spend 12 months tiptoeing around how unskilled they are and teaching them things like how to find the help icon or use a dictionary.



#24 eachschoolholidays

Posted 06 December 2012 - 11:24 AM

QUOTE (steppy @ 06/12/2012, 11:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My teen just did a year of school (Year 11), didn't hand in a single piece of satisfactory work and was told they would fail the year, and then the teacher did a pity run and allowed teen to submit all their work after term ended at a very low quality. Pass! Same result as all the other kids who worked all year. I know which kid was the smartest - the one who did nothing and got away with no visible consequences yet again.


This is neither the school nor the teacher's fault. The Board of Studies rules state that students must be given warning that they have not met the outcomes of the course and be given opportunity to remedy it.  It's certainly not a "pity run".  It is seriously frustrating as a teacher!  

What I consider to be satisfactory, and what the Board considers to be satisfactory also vary considerably.

Perhaps people could take their complaints to the Board of Studies?

#25 FeralRebelWClaws

Posted 06 December 2012 - 11:25 AM

I think that there is varying levels of what is "sound". At the school I am currently at, I'm grading far more generously than I normally would. (Edit: I don't think there should be varying levels, but currently there is... hopefully the AC and standards will help, though when different states have different grades meaning the same thing, it's not going to happen in a hurry!)

We have large numbers of students with significant home issues, and a large amount of resources, time and energy goes into supporting those students and I believe that sometimes some students with academic needs who are not at risk slip through the cracks.

While in an ideal world teachers should be able to support every single student, there may be 30 students in the class and those with more immediate needs are being tended to first. The teacher doesn't have the same understanding of a child as their parent does. The teacher hasn't been on their school journey right through, unlike the parents.

I do think it's concerning if they are being told well done when they have had limited achievement. I can't understand why that would occur, unless they are trying to build confidence in the child, as they believe that confidence is a barrier to success for the child.

Edited by PussyDids, 06 December 2012 - 11:29 AM.





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Funny Father's Day cards

A little fun never goes astray when celebrating special occasions and Father's Day is no different. We've rounded up some funny Father's day cards for your husbands, fathers and other important men in your lives.

Electronic tags may keep newborns safe

The possibility of using electronic bracelets for mothers and their newborn babies is being investigated by Adelaide's Women's and Children's Hospital. 

Baby steps: when your little one starts walking

As a parent there are so many milestones to look forward to. That first smile, first word - and, of course, that first step.

Julia Watson's new book 'Breakfast, School Run, Chemo'

Tomorrow my friend Julia launches her first book. And while we're all overjoyed, the success is tinged with sadness. You see, Julia has stage 4 bowel cancer.

How not to name twins

Call me boring, but I don't think that when it comes to choosing my twins' names is the right time to use a good pun.

Fun Sunny Life pool inflatables just for babies

The babies of 2015 will thus be thrilled to paddle their happy baby legs in these brand new flamingo and swan baby inflatables.

Baby and bulldog born on the same day are best friends

When Chicago mum Ivette Ivens saw a French bulldog puppy who had the same birthdate as her son Dilan, she "just knew it?s meant to be" and took him home. Five months later, puppy Farley and Dilan are the best of friends - as Ivens says, "I?m pretty sure Dilan thinks they?re both the same species, as they walk at the same level and are both going through the stage of chewing on everything.?

Breastfeeding basics for beginners

Here are 10 tips to help make breastfeeding successful and stress free for both you and your baby as quickly as possible.

Girl smothers baby brother with peanut butter

This mum had a big clean up job on her hands.

How to hide those under eye shadows

Pandas are the only ones who benefit from under-eye shadows. If you're not fluffy and cute, you'll just look tired.

Young mum dies after being denied pap smear

A mother has died after she was denied a pap smear because she was deemed "too young" to need it.

Birthday cakes banned at childcare centre

A childcare centre in Sydney has banned birthday cakes after parent complaints about excessive sugar and children with allergies being left out.

Triplet surprise for newlyweds

As the radiographer moved the wand over her abdomen, Shelley King got the surprise of her life.

3 yummy Thermomix baby and toddler recipes

Louise Fulton Keats shares her recipes for babies and toddlers, including corn and sweet pikelets, pumpkin and pea risotto, and cheesy bunny biscuits.

Man arrested over toddler Nikki's death

A 31-year-old man has been arrested over the death of two-year-old Nikki Francis-Coslovich in Mildura.

Adoption ban on pregnant women to be lifted

Pregnant women will no longer be barred from adoption waiting lists in NSW, after the Baird Government decided the practice was discriminatory.

Are you getting enough magnesium?

Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body, but we don't talk enough about it and the vital role it plays in great health and energy, as well as disease prevention.

5 workplace lessons for new parents

Take heart in these principles that will transfer seamlessly from the workplace into your new life as a parent.

Mums to follow on Instagram

A creative outlet for many, there are some savvy women complementing their blogs and businesses with riveting Instagrams feeds. We've chosen a few which have bucketloads of appeal; there are some big time players and some smaller local ones, and they each bring their special brand of magic to the Instagram experience.

Review: The Volvo 2015 XC90 SUV has all the safety features your family needs

The new Volvo XC90 SUV's focus on keeping you safe does not come at the expense of comfort in the XC90.

Kim Kardashian reveals she may have hysterectomy

Kim Kardashian has revealed complications during pregnancy means she might have to have a hysterectomy after the birth of her second child.

Why late night snacks wreak havoc on weight loss

 Loath as you may be to admit it, chances are that at some point you have found yourself in the kitchen late at night, devouring food.

Toddler twins pretend to be asleep to fool mum

They say twins have a unique connection. If this cute clip is anything to go by, these toddler sisters like to use their special bond to try to fool their mother.

Dad bags: 10 picks for out and about

Getting out of the house is a big priority in the early years of parenthood and you need to take a well-stocked kit with you. We've chosen 10 of the best nappy bags sure to appeal to dads in style and function.

Win a Mountain Buggy Swift

To celebrate Essential Baby reaching half a million Facebook fans, we have a Mountain Buggy Swift to giveaway to a lucky fan.

Get your FREE Baby & Toddler Show ticket!

Get your free ticket to the Sydney Essential Baby & Toddler Show for September 25-27 - register online now.

 
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Dads who do their share have more sex: study

For women trying to encourage their partners to take more interest in fatherhood, it could be the ultimate incentive.

Think you might have IBS, coeliac disease or Crohn's?

Conditions affecting the gastrointestinal tract are common in modern humans, and many are on the rise - including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and coeliac disease.

Couple poses for newborn shoot with adorable puppy

Tired of being asked about their baby-making plans, Australian couple Matt and Abby decided to give a creative answer.

The exercises you know you should be doing (but probably aren't)

I bet your to-do list today is long. But somewhere on that massive list, are you making time for your pelvic floor?

This baby really loves the family cat

Some babies get excited when mum or dad come to get them from their cot after a nap.

Designer kids clothing good enough to eat by Oeuf

Even if you aren't heading to the Northern hemisphere in the next six months, you can't help but love the amazing food-themed knits for babies and kids by cult kids brand Oeuf.

Early exposure to peanuts recommended for allergy prevention

A paediatricians' group is recommending that infants at high risk of peanut allergies be given foods containing peanuts before they turn one.

Home brand foods contain less salt than pricier rivals

Supermarket home brand foods, long derided as cheap and inferior, contain far lower levels of salt than pricier, branded rivals, new research shows.

Nannies for hire, wherever you're flying

Ever dreaded the prospect of a long flight, dreaming about how wonderful it would be for a nanny to entertain the kids?

Couple poses for newborn shoot with adorable puppy

Tired of being asked about their baby-making plans, Australian couple Matt and Abby decided to give a creative answer: with an unusual photo shoot with their 'baby', a groodle (poodle/golden retriever cross) named Humphrey. The talented Elisha from Elisha Minnette Photography caught all the precious shots.

Is it okay to name your baby with a sense of humour?

My husband was sure that Danger was a good option for a boy. And as the pregnancy progressed, it actually started to sound really good.

Woman gives birth after having her own mother's uterus transplanted

In a world first, a healthy baby has been born from the same womb that nurtured his own mother.

So hot right now: double-barrelled baby names on the rise

It's one way to make your baby stand out from the pack – giving them not one, but two first names.

Second time around: is it really better the devil you know?

When I fell pregnant with my second child I was, naturally, very excited. Then it all started to come back to me - and I freaked.

Shopping with kids: breaking the pester-power cycle

You're out shopping with your little one and they're incessantly whining that they want a treat. It's easy to say no ... the first time, at least.

How did we have babies before apps came along?

Three months ago, my wife, Chrysta, and I were driving along Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles when she let out a harrowing cry.

When your toddler disagrees

There comes a time when your child starts having different views to you. I didn't realise that time would come so soon.

Win a Pacapod this Father's Day

To celebrate dads and families, we are giving away a Picos Pack from Pacapod Australia filled with a few extra goodies ENTER NOW

 

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Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.