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Elective Caesarean


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#1 captain crunch

Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:06 PM

Hi,
This is my first post on EB, however I have been a member for a little while TTC, not posting however taking valuable insights from others.
I wanted to post this as I have been doing my research (for a while) and I really struggle to find others in my situation.
I want to have an elective caesarean for no medical reasons, just because I want to. I have my own reasons to do with things life sex after vb, episiotomies, pain etc...
I completely respect everyone's choices for how they want to give birth, I'm just curious to know if there are others out there who want to have an elective C to, just because they do.
I find that a lot of the posts on forums (in Oz) that speak about "elective C" are followed by, I'm having or had a elective C because....x y z reasons. It's rare to find someone having it purely because they want to.
FYI, this will be my 1st, I'm 27, have no medical problems (although TTc)
Is there anybody else out there?

#2 Boombox

Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:19 PM

You certainly aren't alone, but you need to speak to an OB to fully understand risks and benefits for you. The fact you had some trouble TTC would be a big red flag for me- a C/S has been shown to have implications on future fertility. It's also likely you'll need private health insurance (if you're in AUS) as the public health system doesn't generally cover unnecessary operations.

#3 Matthias' mum

Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:21 PM

Every person I know who went into pregnancy wanting an elective c section was talked out of it by their care providers. It has higher risks for both you and the baby, which is why it isn't encouraged.

Coming from the perspective of someone who has had a planned c section for medical reasons, I can say it is much more pleasant and civilised then an emergency one, and the recovery is better. That said, it was still REALLY, REALLY painful. For several weeks. It's has been nearly 6 months, and my tummy still gets sore if I exercise. The other thing to consider is that it will limit the amount of children/pregnancies you can safely have.

Most people who have a vaginal birth recover completely within a week or two. That's why people don't think elective C sections are a great idea. I know birth and the idea of all that pain is scary, but please don't underestimate how painful a c section can be.

#4 B.3

Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:22 PM

Not me but I do have a friend that did. I started having kids a few years before her and she always said she didn't want to know about anything 'birth' when her time came. When her time did come, she elected for C/S under general. She did that twice then elected for a hysterectomy!! Not the way I'd do it but each to their own. She was happy and got the exact births she wanted, no hang ups at all.  biggrin.gif

I've had one VB drug free and 2 emergency C/S. Both have pros and cons. I don't really have an opinion on how other people have their babies.

Good luck.  original.gif

#5 captain crunch

Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:24 PM

Sorry, I should add that although I have been a member since nov 11, we were going to start TTC last year but some changes in my Husbands employment delayed that. (for the best really)
I've only just gone off the pill after 10years, so as soon as my first period comes we'll be starting to TTC for the first time, soon hopefully.

#6 captain crunch

Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:27 PM

Thanks Bec+3, that's one of the first I've heard of someone having it just because they choose too.

#7 lisles

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:05 PM

Hi OP,

I have a friend who made that choice - she's a doctor, and her OB was happy to let her decide.  She was very happy with how it all went.

I didn't, but wish I had!  It was months before I could sit or walk properly after a "normal vaginal delivery", and quite frankly my sex life was completely ruined.  I still have a painful scar years later and have had to go through corrective surgery which didn't really make much difference.  I would have been better off with a Caesar, and I know I'm not the only woman in this situation.  Doctors and midwives are very happy to tell you the risks of having a Caesar, what they rarely tell you about is the long term damage to your body that vaginal birth can inflict. Regardless of which way you birth, there's no such thing as an easy way out for you or your baby!

Talk it over with your doctor and make your own mind up OP, your reasons are completely valid and you will have no trouble finding an OB to support you, as long as you have private cover.  If you don't you might like to consider taking it out before TTC as you won't be covered if you are already pregnant when you join.  As previous posters said, you may not have any choice in the public system.

Good luck with your journey in to parenthood OP!








#8 tibs

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:20 PM

I did, 3 times now.  No regrets just 3 gorgeous healthy children  original.gif

#9 raone

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:26 PM

biggrin.gif I was like this at the beginning of my pregnancy.

My advice is do a bit of research and let both ways sit with you a bit. I knew I wouldn't get a csection being public so I read everything I could and focused on positives. I was back and forth for months on what I could handle. In the end I developed pre eclampsia was induced and after 12 hrs of labour had a csection anyway. and I was actually more terrified being wheeled in for the c section. Its also not as painless as you would expect. They tell you you will only feel pressure but that pressure is really uncomfortable. Really either way you go there are risks .

Just try to be prepared for whatever eventuates.

#10 captain crunch

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:30 PM

Thanks lisles, I do have private health with cover.
And thank you Tibs! I'd love to hear more about what it was like for you having made that decision.
I'm happy with my choice and frankly don't care what others/friends/family etc... Think I should do when the time comes. It truley is a women's decision to do whatever they feel is best for them and there baby. I'm just a little surprised at the reaction I get when I mention it, and feel that this is why some women may say they are having an elective C, however follow it up with a "medical reason" so they don't have to deal with those reactions.
I know I'm getting ahead of myself, considering I'm not pregnant yet, but as a few friends/family are pregnant we of course discuss these things and it's just been really interesting.

Cheers for the thoughts.

#11 littlesticky

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:36 PM

I had an elective c/s because I wanted to. For me, best decision ever. Up and about as soon as they would let me take the catheter up. The most pain was removing the stitches.

#12 Great Dame

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:45 PM

There are a lot of myths about VB and I suggest you really do your research with qualified people, not google.  The things you are worried about - sex after VB, pain, epi - can all be managed.  And you do realize C/S is not without pain?  

Unless medically advised, it's better for the baby to come through the birth canal.  Recovery for most people is far easier and less painful than a C/S.  And sex after VB?  It's fine, sometimes even better.  Your sex life is more likely to be damaged by your post-birth hormones, sleep deprivation and new baby demands, than a VB.

#13 captain crunch

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:53 PM

Thanks littlestickey, good to know.
Madame Cattey, yes I realise there is still potential pain/complications etc.. With a C section. Also thanks for your view on a vaginal birth.

#14 bambiigrrl

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:14 PM

Sweety i really dont think your gonna get away from long term damage which ever way you go im afraid. Its just as likely to happen either way. I have attempted 2 vaginal births, with long labours ending in c sections, and for my next pregnancy (i am also ttc at the moment) I intend on attempting to birth naturally once again. 3rd time lucky right? Even though labour is very painful, I still loved giving birth, weird as that sounds. What I dont love is the fact that because of my c sections i now interstial cystitis, which is a fancy word for permanent bladder pain, like a uti you can never get rid of. I have flare up during ovulation every month and can not eat or drink anything acidic because it causes major pain that codiene doesnt really touch.

Also the recovery was not too bad the first time, but the second time was much much worse, i couldnt even walk without being in agony for over a week after, but i had to walk so i didnt get blood clots in my legs. And yes, when they pull the baby out, it hurts ALOT. I have heard so many wonderful stories about vaginal births, maybe consider giving it a try, you never know you might love it! Either way, if you wanna havea  baby, you are gonna have go through a lot of pain, whichever way you choose to birth, theres just no getting away from it. sorry!

#15 Hattie

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:23 PM

I chose to have an elective caesarean (although in the end baby was breech so would have been caesar anyway). I had my reasons, discussed with DH, informed myself (read a lot) and discussed in depth with both my GP and Ob. It went beautifully, and To this day 4.5 years later I think of DS' birth as a wonderful, peaceful, happy and calm day. Recovery was a breeze (honestly) and if I 'd been able to carry to full-term again I would have had an elective caesar again.

I have two friends who have also had elective caesars. Their stories are similar to mine.

Good luck.

Cheers,
Julie

#16 CocobeanLillylove

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:27 PM

QUOTE (bambiigrrl @ 30/11/2012, 05:14 PM)
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Also the recovery was not too bad the first time, but the second time was much much worse, i couldnt even walk without being in agony for over a week after, but i had to walk so i didnt get blood clots in my legs. And yes, when they pull the baby out, it hurts ALOT. I have heard so many wonderful stories about vaginal births, maybe consider giving it a try, you never know you might love it! Either way, if you wanna havea  baby, you are gonna have go through a lot of pain, whichever way you choose to birth, theres just no getting away from it. sorry!


Didn't hurt one little but when they pulled my babies out. Your doctors must not have checked that your epi or spinal block was working.

#17 Bluenomi

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:28 PM

I have a good friend who wanted an elective c section years before she ever got pregnant. In the end she had to have a c section for medical reasons so that made it much easier for her to get one. She did have to find a understanding OB and pay for the privilage but it was something she felt was right for her.

#18 MuminMtEliza

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:33 PM

Hi OP,

I have had an elective Caesar after previously having a vaginal birth (which admittedly wasn't too bad - no tears, stitches, quite quick labour etc). I had my reasons for wanting an elective and mentioned it at my first OB appt. Whilst he correctly told me about Caesar risks, he said he was happy to give me one if I still wanted one toward the end of my pregnancy. I was lucky I wanted a Caesar as I ended up with pre-eclampsia and pneumonia and was hospitalized. When they decided at 35 weeks, that it was time to get my DD out, I didn't have the strength or breath to labour naturally. That being said, I had a lot more pain recovering from my Caesar than my vaginal birth, but am still glad I had the Caesar. Good luck.

#19 Wahwah

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:41 PM

I had an elective c-section after an emergency one the first time. Not because I was advised to, not because of risks, not because of anything other than I didn't want to try for a VBAC and end up with an emergency c-section again.

I recovered quickly both times and have no regrets at all about not having a vaginal birth.

My best mate opted for a c-section for her only child. She had no interest at all in delivering any other way.

#20 FlamingoG

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:50 PM

I had one - always wanted one, never waivered despite plenty of negativity about my decision. My recovery was great - obviously it's different for everyone, but I found the whole experience really calm and positive and have no regrets. Feel free to PM me if you like - I had a friend do it before me, and found it reassuring to get her views.

#21 soontobegran

Posted 30 November 2012 - 05:05 PM

Honestly OP if this is what you want you are probably best not to ask for advice here because it will never make your decision any easier. There are many people who do not and never will understand the reason why you'd make this choice and fill you with horror stories that IRL have very little chance of happening.
There are risks with both types of delivery, there are just more risks with C/S but having said that the maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality rate following C/S are very low.

Good luck with whatever you choose and remember you do not have to explain your reasons to anyone other than your immediate caregiver.

If you have PHI and a private obstetrician it is something that only you, your partner and he need to discuss.
Your Obstetrician will probably lay out the reasons why a vaginal birth would be preferable but will most likely also say yes if he thinks you are well informed.

#22 Corella

Posted 30 November 2012 - 05:15 PM

Also keep in mind that there are benefits to you going into labour, even just one contraction, for your baby. They have chosen their due date so they are not what's known as a "late term premature" (perhaps add that to the list of things to Google in helping you make a decision?) and have breathing issues which will mean they need to go to the nursery. Just be wary of an ob who is keen to agree with you but insists on booking you weeks before your due date.

Focus on skin-to-skin in the theatre, breastfeeding support in the hospital (if that's what you are going to do) and so forth as well.  


#23 JAPN2

Posted 30 November 2012 - 05:15 PM

OP I've never had a C/S but i can tell you after 3 VBs I do have some long term damage that can only be solved by surgery.

Yes my recoveries post births were fast and not too painful.

Its hard to say  whether the damage would have been sustained and been as bad if I'd had a C/S. But you should talk to you OB.

#24 zingy

Posted 30 November 2012 - 05:28 PM

*SORRY IF THIS IS TMI BUT I WANTED TO SHARE*

Hi OP

My SIL chose to have a c-section for her first and for her it was all about the planning. She wanted to know exactly when she was going to be in hospital and it took the unknowns out of it for her, when will it happen, where will I be, how long will it take etc etc. When my nephew was delivered he was massive and she was told that there is no way he could have been delivered vaginally!

My first was a VG delivery at 32 weeks with a couple of stitches. I did recover very quickly however it was very sensitive down there for years after. It's OK now though. This is the preferred way for prems to be delivered where possible, it is far less traumatic for them to come out the birth canal (I only just found this out).

My twins were delivered by a planned c-section at 34 weeks. When I say planned, I knew that my OB was going to do a c-section. I chose a c-section because I had high anxiety about the birth due to previous losses and I needed to feel like we had a certain amount of control. I was worried about what would happen to the second bub while the first bub was being laboured etc. etc. I just wanted my OB to get in and get them out quick smart. I recovered just as quickly from the c-section but it's annoying not being able to lift things bla bla etc etc. Overall I was very happy that I chose the c-section. My ob is fabulous so no issues what so ever.

With my third pregnancy I had an emergency c-section at 29 weeks as bub was breech furling and had the cord wrapped around his ankles. This time I was in a different state and in the public system, not by choice but because I had gone into labour before 32 weeks, my ob couldn't deliver at the hospital with the NICU. This experience was a total disaster. My baby boy was delivered by trainee ob's who didn't know what they were doing. They had trouble getting him out and after 3 mins of trying, they should have done a vertical cut in my uterus but they didn't. They kept pulling harder and harder on my skin/muscles to make the opening as big as possible and trying to pull him out and eventually, after 20 minutes he was born but the ending wasn't good for my little man. This c-section has been a very hard recovery. It has been 3 months and my tummy muscles are still so sore, all the way up to my ribs. I had bladder issues for weeks after and now I'm prone to my bladder mucking up and not emptying properly.

I have just found out that I'm pregnant again. This time I don't have a choice, if I get past 34 weeks it will have to be a c-section but if I went into pre-term labour again, I would definitely try to deliver VBAC to minimise the trauma for the bub.

My point is that it's OK to have your heart set on one or the other but pregnancy and birth is an unpredictable thing and you need to be prepared for anything. Things can change very quickly.



#25 Loulla

Posted 30 November 2012 - 05:33 PM

Not really answering your question, but want to say that pregnancy, birth and carrying your baby around afterwards all put a strain on your body. It's a part of life and bearing a child. My VB was one of the most amazing experiences I've ever had, actually the most amazing. I got up and walked around afterwards and felt fine. I have recovered and even have sex shock horror! I had 2nd degree tearing which I had hardly any pain with when healing and is fine now. I think my body would feel like it has carried and born and child regardless of CS or VB. Obvously I don't care you want to have elective CS but just want you to know that I had a good experience.

Eta remember, you could have your CS booked in but bub suddenly decides to come by VB...

Edited by Loulla, 30 November 2012 - 05:36 PM.





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