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childcare v nanny
dont know what to do


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#1 crazyforkids

Posted 30 November 2012 - 01:11 PM

I have just hired a nanny that will start at the end of jan 3 days a week but is going to do some days here and there until then. she will be looking after 2 kids through the day and all 5 mornings and afternoons.
I have just received the paper work for dd to start child care at the end of jan. i didnt think she would get in but she has been accepted for all 3 days.

I know that the nanny will cost me more but she has so much flexibilty that i need with me starting uni and having 5 kids. but between now and end of jan she could change her mind and if i say no the the child care i could be left iwthout anything.

The child care is cheaper but im not a huge fan of them. also i would then have to pay school hoildays when my kids are away and i would have to figure out what to do with my other kids.

Im really not sure what to do. go for a cheaper option or go with flexibility?

Please help me

#2 Ice Queen

Posted 30 November 2012 - 01:16 PM

I would choose a nanny no questions asked if money was not an issue.  

I had a nanny 1 day per week with DD when I owned my own business.  No packing lunches, bags with spare clothes, rush to get out in the morning etc.  she would arrive while DD was in the highchair having breaky.  Off I would go leaving her to dress her, clean up after breaky.  I arrived home to a tidy house, dishes done and sometimes dinner cooking.  It was sheer heaven.  She very rarely did extra housework but on the odd occasion I would leave a load of washing for her hangout.

#3 Feral-as-Meggs

Posted 30 November 2012 - 01:23 PM

Gosh nanny for sure if you have the money.  Plus she can still come if your child is sick.

#4 Mpjp is feral

Posted 30 November 2012 - 01:26 PM

I've done both, and my kids were FAR happier w the nanny. Also once you factor in school holiday program and ohsh $ if you use it, then the costs may be same-ish?

#5 au*lit

Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:03 PM

We've recently hired a nanny for our 18 month old DS. I returned to work 3 days a week.

Although childcare would be cheaper and we'd get the CCR, we are very happy with the decision. DS is also very happy with her - I'm not sure he'd be as happy to be left at day care.

To minimise the hours we have to pay the nanny (and maximise DS's time with us) in the mornings DH leaves early and DS & have breakfast and get ready for the day. The nanny is here by 8.30 and I leave shortly after. DH is home by 5pm to take over.

If we had to do day care drop offs I think our mornings would be much more stressful and less enjoyable.

Plus we are avoiding the constant illness that seems to affect most kids in day care, and if DS has a cold the nanny can still take care of him.

And as the PP said, we don't have to pay her when we take holidays.

#6 IVL

Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:06 PM

We have done both also and nanny wins by far. By the time you add in all the other tasks they can help with, I think you will actually be in front if there is more than 1 child to look after.

#7 a letter to Elise.

Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:11 PM

Definitely the nanny. No morning rush, much calmer, and she can come if they're sick. We have a nanny and she has a really special relationship with the children. I feel better knowing that DS will be comforted by someone he cares about if he is sick or bumps himself.

#8 SeaPrincess

Posted 30 November 2012 - 07:50 PM

We've done both and I'm going to buck the trend and say that daycare worked out better for us when the children were younger.   That said, I am looking at increasing my working hours next year and we are considering trying a nanny again. I will take whichever nanny I want because we won't get any CCR for her.  I'm prepared to give it another shot because I don't want the children to miss out on their out of school activities - I want someone who can take them to swimming/dancing/karate or whatever so I don't have to cram it all in on the weekend.

OP, in your position, I would give the nanny a shot through the hols (maybe even with extra days than you had originally planned) and see what you think. How much notice do you need to give if you don't take the daycare spot? It's usually only 2 weeks, so you've got some time.

#9 dancesthroughlife

Posted 30 November 2012 - 10:23 PM

Just curious as I've been considering taking DS out of daycare an getting a nanny to suit my odd work hours more, people who have a nanny how did you go about hiring them? Is there a reputable company you go through or do you put an add out? I've never know anyone with a nanny so it's all new to me!

#10 Fright bat

Posted 30 November 2012 - 10:28 PM

QUOTE (au*lit @ 30/11/2012, 03:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
And as the PP said, we don't have to pay her when we take holidays.


Really? Most nannies are paid a wage + super + annual leave + sick leave. Same as any other employee. As if YOU take holidays - tough titties. You still pay the nanny.

That is, if you're paying your nanny in a legal and appropriate fashion.

#11 SeaPrincess

Posted 30 November 2012 - 11:56 PM

QUOTE (MsN @ 30/11/2012, 08:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Really? Most nannies are paid a wage + super + annual leave + sick leave. Same as any other employee. As if YOU take holidays - tough titties. You still pay the nanny.

That is, if you're paying your nanny in a legal and appropriate fashion.

It's my understanding that you don't have to pay super unless they are working over 30 hours a week (although I couldn't tell you where I got that from). However, I do know for sure that even when we were using a nanny through a local govt agency and getting CCR, we only paid for absences if we cancelled care for some reason, not for her sick days or leave.

#12 eachschoolholidays

Posted 01 December 2012 - 07:42 AM

We use a mixture of both.  Days when the kids are with the nanny are much easier - not getting out of the house, no packing bags etc etc  

If money is not the issue, I would be going the nanny.

#13 MrsShine

Posted 01 December 2012 - 08:23 AM

I have been a nanny - many times, in 2-3 day positions, full time and casual and I was one of the only ones I knew of that committed to time frames agreed upon with the parents  before starting the job and also gave proper notice when I was leaving a position. (In fact in my last 2 day a week position I gave 6 weeks notice as I knew it would be difficult for the family to find a new nanny).

But that said, through the agency I was with, the families past experiences and the grapevine MANY other nannies just leave with zero notice, don't show up, and are very unreliable.

So you'd have to be careful choosing one as if they did this to you work and uni would be difficult to juggle. That's just in my experience though, and plenty of nannies are amazing but they can also be as rare as hens teeth even if they do seem wonderful in the beginning.

Oh and, I know zero nannies who are paid legally PP, most have become nannies BECAUSE of the cash pay and leave child care positions which are lowly paid.

I have always insisted that families pay me even when they are on holidays or they don't need me if they expect me to show up when they get back! (Which I think is fair enough - what's the nanny mention to live on in the meantime?)

When I have kids I don't think I'd use a nanny - I see too many of them hanging out with BF's through the day, ignoring kids and sitting on their phones for hrs on end!

I'd pick a good child are centre any day.

#14 crazyforkids

Posted 01 December 2012 - 02:06 PM

Thanks everyone.

I found my nanny through find a babysitter. She has a second job. so in the school holidays she will increase her work load there. if she didnt have this job i would pay her for holidays because i would feel bad. My hubby is a teacher and im at uni so we have a lot of holidays between us.

I think i will stick with the nanny for now. she is coming on tuesday for a day. she is starting at 7:30am and she is going to see how our crazy day goes. im going to leave her with the kids for a couple of hours. she is also going to do some babysitting for us between now and the end of jan. she hopefully she will get a good idea how our family is.

this is the first time we have done this so it will be a bit of a trial and error thing. hopefully not to many errors.




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