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Is in it pointless?
Being told to send kids to school if a strike is an inconvenience.


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39 replies to this topic

#1 Oriental lily

Posted 28 November 2012 - 03:03 PM

Is in that the point?

To inconvenience the school community so that irate parents put pressure on the state goverment?

Just go a letter today and a half day strike is on Friday. About a third of the teachers in the school is striking and have asked the students of these teachers to come in at 12.45.
Then in bold letters say if it's to much an inconvenience to send students at normal time and they will be looked after.

Dd teacher is striking but she has swimming in the morning so has been told to start at normal time to not miss out.

Honestly JUST INCONVENIENCE US!

Teachers need to get what they are promised and deserve.
Don't stuff around.



#2 peking homunculus

Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:02 PM

There is an argument that the "scabs" who continue to teach and receive a pay check for the day but who take all the benefits that may be gained from strike action should not be given a free ride and should have to do exta work ie look after more kids on a strike day

#3 Expelliarmus

Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:07 PM

That's to fulfil duty of care. I daresay in some schools the child's need to be safe outranks the legitimate grievance of the teaching and support staff.

#4 kadoodle

Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:10 PM

Which state, OP?


#5 JuniPooks_

Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:12 PM

My school had a lot of self employed parents and casual workers in sh*tty jobs and carers of disabled, sick and elderly people, so strikes caused a lot more grief than the word "inconvenience" can really sum up. I remember in highschool we were able to come in, usually I didn't as my parents supported the strikes (Jeff Kennet days, for any Victorians...). One time I did go in because mum had a commitment, and all we did was sit in a class room mucking up while a teacher sat there reading a book to herself. It was soooooo boring.

#6 kadoodle

Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:30 PM

You mean you didn't go march in solidarity with all the teachers getting Jeffed, Pooks?

#7 Nine.years

Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:37 PM

It's only pointless if you don't care whether they recieve an education or not!

On strike days they supervise the kids that turn up, they don't teach them.

#8 JuniPooks_

Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:40 PM



QUOTE (kadoodle @ 28/11/2012, 05:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You mean you didn't go march in solidarity with all the teachers getting Jeffed, Pooks?


Oh I did, once or twice wink.gif

#9 Oriental lily

Posted 28 November 2012 - 05:21 PM

It's Vic.

In my school there is 8 1/2 composites classes.

Only one of those teachers (DDs teacher) is striking. And the grade 2 s are expected to go due to swimming.
Any of the grade 1 s that turn up will be split in to the rest of the classes and I doubt they will be isolated so that they are not being taught.
I imagine they will be doing whatever the other students are being taught.

I am just sad that the strike action seems like a watered down 'gesture'.

I have three teachers in the family(all in the union) and I would be happy for this actio to make a impact.

They deserve it.

Edited by Oriental lily, 28 November 2012 - 05:22 PM.


#10 peking homunculus

Posted 29 November 2012 - 10:54 AM

QUOTE (Oriental lily @ 28/11/2012, 06:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It's Vic.

In my school there is 8 1/2 composites classes.

Only one of those teachers (DDs teacher) is striking. And the grade 2 s are expected to go due to swimming.
Any of the grade 1 s that turn up will be split in to the rest of the classes and I doubt they will be isolated so that they are not being taught.
I imagine they will be doing whatever the other students are being taught.

I am just sad that the strike action seems like a watered down 'gesture'.

I have three teachers in the family(all in the union) and I would be happy for this actio to make a impact.

They deserve it.


It is pretty bad that all those teachers are NOT striking! I can't imagine why they are choosing to not strike. I guess some people just like to leave the heavy lifting to others

#11 Oriental lily

Posted 29 November 2012 - 11:03 AM

They are not in the union.

My mil and BIL are both teachers who are in the union. There seems to be a 'culture' in some schools of not being in the union. Only about 10 teachers in our school are.

I think the cost is about 600 a year.

I guess for some that cost is to high.

But yeah I can imagine why some teachers would be annoyed and frustrated with none union teachers getting a piggy back ride on others.

#12 MrsLexiK

Posted 29 November 2012 - 11:03 AM

QUOTE (peking homunculus @ 29/11/2012, 11:54 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It is pretty bad that all those teachers are NOT striking! I can't imagine why they are choosing to not strike. I guess some people just like to leave the heavy lifting to others


This mentality is the reason I was turned away from teaching.  sad.gif I think I would have made a good teacher too (although I am sure DH would have gotten sick and tired of having to spell check all of my notes I sent home original.gif ), but the pressure to be part of a union and to strike or be called a scab wasn't what I wanted.

Having said that, I only remember one strike when I was a student (I wasn't in public school education for very long and they don't strike in the private sector) and I remember even then thinking it was odd that the students would still be supervised thus actually not inconveniencing the parents because especially at this time of the year I don't think too many parents would be up in arms about a quiet day of no learning.

#13 peking homunculus

Posted 29 November 2012 - 11:17 AM

QUOTE (MrsLexiK @ 29/11/2012, 12:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This mentality is the reason I was turned away from teaching.  sad.gif I think I would have made a good teacher too (although I am sure DH would have gotten sick and tired of having to spell check all of my notes I sent home original.gif ), but the pressure to be part of a union and to strike or be called a scab wasn't what I wanted.


My M&D were heavily involved in the union. They gave a lot of time and effort in trying to improve schools for kids and for teachers.

They were very frustrated at teachers who didn't do anything but were happy to take the benefits that the union negotiated and fought for. Those teachers made no effort and no sacrifice; they never lost a day's pay.

no wonder the unionised teachers pressure the others! You can imagine how frustrating it would be

#14 archy grousesheila

Posted 29 November 2012 - 11:28 AM

Family member who is a secondary teacher says there is a lot less union membership among primary school teachers (this in in Vic, and yes this family member did march about being Jeffed).  Dunno if that is true, but certainly in times when this family member and other unionist at her school were on strike, and her secondary school was virtually non-functional for the day, there seemed to be 100% teacher presence at my kids' primary school.

#15 StinkerSlinker

Posted 29 November 2012 - 12:28 PM

Deleted

Edited by Willoughby Chase, 30 December 2012 - 10:22 PM.


#16 BobTony

Posted 29 November 2012 - 12:40 PM

No tess, it's accurate. The only benefits we as workers have ever managed to gain has been because we organised into trade unions. We didn't get the 8 hour day, sick leave, health and safety, social security, a pension, and end to child labour, because someone decided it'd be a nice thing to do. We got it beause ordinary people in unions fought and died for it.

And I think it stinks that people are more than happy to take all these things that have been fought for, but won't join the organisations that helped it happen.

#17 StinkerSlinker

Posted 29 November 2012 - 12:51 PM

Deleted

Edited by Willoughby Chase, 30 December 2012 - 10:23 PM.


#18 MrsLexiK

Posted 29 November 2012 - 12:56 PM

QUOTE (peking homunculus @ 29/11/2012, 12:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My M&D were heavily involved in the union. They gave a lot of time and effort in trying to improve schools for kids and for teachers.

They were very frustrated at teachers who didn't do anything but were happy to take the benefits that the union negotiated and fought for. Those teachers made no effort and no sacrifice; they never lost a day's pay.

no wonder the unionised teachers pressure the others! You can imagine how frustrating it would be

I think Tess soums it up for me best and my feelings and about not wanting to be labelled a scab so rather I choose to not be in a profession where unions where big and almost everyone was part of one.

QUOTE (tess @ 29/11/2012, 01:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I imagine there is also some ongoing frustration on the part of non-unionized teachers, too.  Imagine how frustrating it must be to have to accept what a union is able to bargain on your behalf, when, if it were possible to negotiate your own salary, you would have a good chnace of being able to negotiate something higher.

I would find it frustrating anyway. Perhaps some teachers feel that the union is doing them no favours. I think it's a bit rude to label them a scab.



#19 jojonbeanie

Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:15 PM

The families of children in my son's special school have been told children at school on the morning of the strike will not be fed morning tea as there will not be sufficient staff to supervise this task. The children are unable to feed themselves and many will have left home not long after 7:00am for their up to two hour bus ride to school. If they get lunch at 12:30  - 1:00 it will be 6-7 hours since most of them ate.


#20 JRA

Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:21 PM

jjb: that is terrible.


Edited by JRA, 29 November 2012 - 01:21 PM.


#21 peking homunculus

Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:54 PM

QUOTE (jojonbeanie @ 29/11/2012, 02:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The families of children in my son's special school have been told children at school on the morning of the strike will not be fed morning tea as there will not be sufficient staff to supervise this task. The children are unable to feed themselves and many will have left home not long after 7:00am for their up to two hour bus ride to school. If they get lunch at 12:30  - 1:00 it will be 6-7 hours since most of them ate.



I'm not sure about the situation in Victoria, but in NSW the gvt has targeted the funding for special needs students. I imagine the staff are working to ensure that kids like your child are well served by the public schooling system

#22 MrsLexiK

Posted 29 November 2012 - 02:04 PM

QUOTE (jojonbeanie @ 29/11/2012, 02:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The families of children in my son's special school have been told children at school on the morning of the strike will not be fed morning tea as there will not be sufficient staff to supervise this task. The children are unable to feed themselves and many will have left home not long after 7:00am for their up to two hour bus ride to school. If they get lunch at 12:30  - 1:00 it will be 6-7 hours since most of them ate.


jjb that is terrible, I get that funding has been cut from special need schools (which is crap to have happened) but doing that to students is horrible.

#23 peking homunculus

Posted 29 November 2012 - 02:04 PM

QUOTE (tess @ 29/11/2012, 01:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yes, I do appreciate the actions of unions in the past.

But as a member of a profession where people would no more join a union than fly to the moon, and as someone who has always negotiated her own salary, I do have some sympathy for those teachers who perhaps are NOT all that "happy" to accept a bargain made by someone else.

But they have no choice, have they? I think that's unfair, personally. So, I guess we will have to disagree.


I have worked as a professional and negotiated my salary in the past. It very often leads to massive inequity in the workplace and the loss of benefits. RDO's were lost with no change to working hours or increase in pay. I was able to negotiate a reasonable solution, but the workers with less education and less hutzpah were left out in the cold.

In this situation I saw people who were good negotiators able to wrangle great salaries, while other workers who were a lot more productive but less pushy were left to rot.

Unions look after everyone- collective bargaining is powerful and it works.

#24 peking homunculus

Posted 29 November 2012 - 02:06 PM

QUOTE (MrsLexiK @ 29/11/2012, 03:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
jjb that is terrible, I get that funding has been cut from special need schools (which is crap to have happened) but doing that to students is horrible.


It's a strike- that's what happens. Parents are given plenty of warning and are able to organise alternative options to schooling on the day.

It does suck, but it's part of what needs to be done to get a result

#25 StinkerSlinker

Posted 29 November 2012 - 02:15 PM

Deleted

Edited by Willoughby Chase, 30 December 2012 - 10:24 PM.





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