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Stressing about money!


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#1 RellBell

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:05 AM

I am starting to REALLY stress about money. My DP and I both work crappy paid retail jobs, and with two of those it's enough to get by comfortably enough... but once bub comes i'm going to be completely out of commission for a little while. How on earth are we going to live on $1200 a fortnight?

To make matters worse, my DP has inheritance money in term deposits (yep, this actually makes things worse) - that he doesn't want to part with. He's willing to spend about $20 000 for a house deposit to get us set up, but refuses to use more as a mortgage is "forced saving"... he said if we can't find a house that his income can support, we may even have to rent for the next few years (how is that forced saving?). ARGH, it drives me mad... when I first met him, he owned a house outright, but recently sold it as he prefers to have the money in a term deposit. I can't even talk to him about it because he says "I don't like to speak about money, and that money is untouchable at this stage". He wants to save it for retirement.

My parents are still young and work full-time, so there's no-one who can babysit... and DP works 6 days a week... So at most I might be able to do some casual work on sunday and saturday night, which will only be another $150 or so. But I don't know how old bub will have to be before I can leave her with her dad. Looks like I won't be affording shampoo, conditioner or toilet paper for a long time.

I bet centrelink is going to refuse us parenting payments, discounted child support and any financial assistance at all because of that bloody money. If he's not intending on ever using it I wish he would just give it away to charity or something, so that we don't have to suffer because of it!  sad.gif

Signed,
   A very distressed pregnant woman  mad.gif

#2 missjoads1234

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:12 AM

He actually sounds quite sensible about the money if you ask me. It seems he wants for you all to be set up for the future and doesnt want to throw the money away willy nilly.

QUOTE
he said if we can't find a house that his income can support, we may even have to rent for the next few years (how is that forced saving?)


How is this a bad idea? Do you want a morgage you both cant afford? By the sounds of your income i doubt the bank would loan you much anyway. Whats wrong with renting? Until the baby is a bit older and you can go back to work for as bit, and have more income whats so bad about renting?

I dont know you're living siutation now but $1200 is EASILY doable. DH, DS and I were living on almost half that when he was a 1st yr apprentice.

#3 Holidayromp

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:16 AM

What you should do it contact Centrelink and find out if it does affect any payments and that is a big if you are entitled to them.

Also with income of $1200.00 a f/n I doubt whether you are going to be eligible for any sort of support which is another reason you need to get onto Centrelink.

Unfortunately you are going to have to learn how to tighten your belts - there are plenty of families out there that try to survive on not much more than that.

I cannot believe the spendthrift ways of DH and I pre-kids but now we live by a very strict budget.  I think you should start saving your wage and learning to live on your DP's wage and stop worrying about spending his inheritance.

#4 item

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:18 AM

He sounds like a tool.

Actually he sounds like a bloke who is doing his best to keep that money seperate from your relationship so you will not ever have a claim on it. Made toolish by refusing to discuss it and the fact you are about to have a child together.

Wether or not you think he's doing that, its time for some couples financial counselling.  You need to think about how YOU are prepared to approach those funds (ie would you be happy to sign a relationship pre-nup  type thing acknowledging he has brought these funds to the relationship) and then you/he need to get some good financial advice (I prefer experienced accountants to financial planners but that's my own thing) about how to make the best of both your financial situations.

#5 lozoodle

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:18 AM

QUOTE (Holidayromp @ 28/11/2012, 08:16 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Also with income of $1200.00 a f/n I doubt whether you are going to be eligible for any sort of support which is another reason you need to get onto Centrelink.


Surely $1200 a f/n they'd be eligible for FTB or something? $1200 a f/n is minimum wage ($606 p/w).


#6 Guest_Dinah_Harris_*

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:20 AM

The term deposits must be generating income?  Can you suggest that you use the interest to help with expenses while not touching the principle?  It may not be much, but it'll all help.


#7 item

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:22 AM

Dinah_Harris I thought there were asset tests though?  Usually your primary place of residence is exempt, but any cash in bank will count toward the asset threshold.

#8 Future-self

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:25 AM

QUOTE (item @ 28/11/2012, 07:18 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Wether or not you think he's doing that, its time for some couples financial counselling.  You need to think about how YOU are prepared to approach those funds (ie would you be happy to sign a relationship pre-nup  type thing acknowledging he has brought these funds to the relationship) and then you/he need to get some good financial advice (I prefer experienced accountants to financial planners but that's my own thing) about how to make the best of both your financial situations.

Absolutely agree. You are his partner and you are having a  child together, of course you need to talk about money!
He is also wrong about the term deposit - the tax you pay on interest earned is darn high, why he thought that was preferable to using the house he owned as an investment property is beyond me - I doubt he sought financial advice on that decision either!

You need to get to Centrelink and get a clear idea of where you will stand in regards to FTA and B and child care benefit etc. Those can be in your name but yes, he will need to disclose exactly how much money he has squirreled away.

#9 missjoads1234

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:27 AM

QUOTE
Surely $1200 a f/n they'd be eligible for FTB or something? $1200 a f/n is minimum wage ($606 p/w).


Not if you have huge amount of assests, including assets generating income. The OP didnt state how much he has in a term deposit however Centrelink really dont allow a great deal of assets before cutting off payments. The OP may however be eligable for the BB. It pays for 6 months OP in installments so it can be quite a but of money fortnightly.

#10 cj82

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:29 AM

Without being nosey, roughly how much money is in there?

You need somewhere to live, living mortgage free or with a low mortgage is a smart way to live, then you can put extra into super or term deposits over the years.

Rent money and bank interest is only dead money if you have an alternative, and you do!

Definitely go to a financial advisor together.

#11 lozoodle

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:29 AM

QUOTE (missjoads1234 @ 28/11/2012, 08:27 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Not if you have huge amount of assests, including assets generating income. The OP didnt state how much he has in a term deposit however Centrelink really dont allow a great deal of assets before cutting off payments. The OP may however be eligable for the BB. It pays for 6 months OP in installments so it can be quite a but of money fortnightly.

Ah ok thanks, I wasn't sure how it worked original.gif

The OP works currently doesn't she? She would be eligible for PPL as that is based on individual income only, and also it works out a bit more than baby bonus too.

#12 Natttmumm

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:30 AM

You should get parental leave payments of around 500 a week for 18 weeks which would help.
If you work retail can you do some part time work once bub is 6 months old when DH is home e.g. Woolworths at night. Even if you only get. A few hundred.
At the end of the day he needs to step up and support his family. Once the bub arrives he will probably change his mind.


#13 RellBell

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:32 AM

*sigh*

I don't want to spend all his money, it is clear that he's not going to use it, I just wish he didn't bloody have it.

Seriously, I don't know how people would manage to live on less than that.. I mean, it is a family on one minimum wage. A house where i'm living is $300 a week minimum, (you can get a small unit for about $250). So that's half your pay (before tax), on rent. Then there's electricity, car insurance and rego, phone and internet bill, food, fuel. I'm sure on minimum wage, we would normally be eligable to some help from centrelink.

I'm saving to pay for my car insurance and rego for the next year, so at least I don't have to lose my car. And i'm on a contract with my phone, so I guess I can  I'm saving everything I make at the moment to try to at least have a little bit of money for myself when I need a new bra, or a trip to the dentist.

And as far as approaching HIS funds, I would be happy to never touch the stupid stuff, he can bury it in the back yard for all I care, I just don't want to be disadvantaged when it comes to government assistance because of it.

#14 RellBell

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:39 AM

QUOTE (Natttmumm @ 28/11/2012, 07:30 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You should get parental leave payments of around 500 a week for 18 weeks which would help.
If you work retail can you do some part time work once bub is 6 months old when DH is home e.g. Woolworths at night. Even if you only get. A few hundred.
At the end of the day he needs to step up and support his family. Once the bub arrives he will probably change his mind.


Oh? So everyone is entitled to the paid parental leave?

I had forgotten about that, that will make things easier. DP never works sundays, so I could probably beg my now boss to let me do split shifts on sundays (8 hours) and do saturday nights (and every second saturday that he has off) - and night fill is an idea too. I'm doing some tafe at the moment, but because my prac is very physical (massage therapy), I still have to contact them to see if I will be able to do my prac while pregnant.

Thanks for the helpful suggestions original.gif

#15 lozoodle

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:42 AM

Here is a link with info about the paid parental leave

http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/s...ental-leave-pay

Its 18 weeks at minimum wage, which is currently $606 per week, but you are of course taxed on that payment.

Hope that helps take some of the stress away original.gif

#16 mummame

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:42 AM

What PP said about there being no support on $1200 a FN is not right. How do I get family tax benefit then and my DP is on more than that a WEEK? They would be on a fair amount of FTB providing the term deposits don't come into it.

#17 item

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:44 AM

With the information you've given I reckon the best way to proceed would be to have him get an accountant to set up a trust with his inheritance.  Then the trust (or the trust and both of you, so three of you as separate entities) could use the funds to purchase a home for you to live in.  His capital is protected from any relationship breakdown but you A) get the benefit of living in a stable environment and a share in any capital gains and B) get to maximise your government entitlements.
I'm not an expert but these would the sorts of enquiries I would be making.  Show him this post, be very clear you're all for him protecting his funds, but let him know that his current behaviour is damaging to your relationship, not to mention detrimental to your child.

#18 Caseymay

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:46 AM

QUOTE (Relly23 @ 28/11/2012, 07:32 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
*sigh*

I don't want to spend all his money, it is clear that he's not going to use it, I just wish he didn't bloody have it.

Seriously, I don't know how people would manage to live on less than that.. I mean, it is a family on one minimum wage. A house where i'm living is $300 a week minimum, (you can get a small unit for about $250). So that's half your pay (before tax), on rent. Then there's electricity, car insurance and rego, phone and internet bill, food, fuel. I'm sure on minimum wage, we would normally be eligable to some help from centrelink.

I'm saving to pay for my car insurance and rego for the next year, so at least I don't have to lose my car. And i'm on a contract with my phone, so I guess I can  I'm saving everything I make at the moment to try to at least have a little bit of money for myself when I need a new bra, or a trip to the dentist.

And as far as approaching HIS funds, I would be happy to never touch the stupid stuff, he can bury it in the back yard for all I care, I just don't want to be disadvantaged when it comes to government assistance because of it.


Yes but is it fair that you (and he) receive government help when he obviously has the means of supporting himself and his family? I don't understand his unwillingness to use the money. I've looked in to it recently and on the current interest rate, if you don't make any extra repayments on your mortgage then you end up paying the same again in interest. So on a $260 000 mortgage you pay (roughly) $260 000 in interest. Why would he want to do that? Doesn't make sense to me?

If my husband refused to discuss money with me I would be mightily peeved and feel like we were not equal partners. I'm sorry you are in this postion OP. Money worries are no fun at all sad.gif

#19 beccajayne

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:51 AM

Until you have bub, Centerlink won't offer much help. We are on a little bit more than your $1200 a f/t and the only help we get from Centerlink is ftb, so a bit of extra money due to having 2 kids.

After you have bub you do have the bb or ppl, which will help a lot.


#20 Team Awesome

Posted 28 November 2012 - 08:02 AM

Gather all your bills and go through them with your partner and make up a sensible budget. Toiletries are necessary but find ways to cut back on these ie spending $50 on shampoo and conditioner is not necessary. you don't need the most expensive brand toilet paper and other things.

Mobile phones don't need to be on expensive plans or even on plans so you can upgrade look at alternatives. check out your other bills to make sure currently getting the best deal on electricity etc.

If you haven't already start including things for baby in your weekly shop like nappies and wipes. I've used cheap nappies and wipes from soon after birth for the last 8.5 years and four children kids don't need huggies and bonds stuff they don't know the difference.

Other ways you can cut back you could try making your own laundry liquid, I do this have done for almost a year but we all had gastro last month and ran out whilst Iw as sick so but will go back to it when we run out (DH bought a huge container of biozet knowing it's what I prefer) You can use vinegar for the fabric softener (I add a few drops of essential oil in it)

I've been doing no shampoo for the last 6 months. My kids don't get designer clothes even when we have a larger  income.

Babies need a loving family to come into so get the money side sorted out now so you can be already to focus on the joy of your baby coming.

Once you've worked out where you can cut back give centrelink a call and have a chat to them.

Good luck.

#21 Ally'smum

Posted 28 November 2012 - 08:05 AM

QUOTE (item @ 28/11/2012, 07:44 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
With the information you've given I reckon the best way to proceed would be to have him get an accountant to set up a trust with his inheritance.  Then the trust (or the trust and both of you, so three of you as separate entities) could use the funds to purchase a home for you to live in.  His capital is protected from any relationship breakdown but you A) get the benefit of living in a stable environment and a share in any capital gains and B) get to maximise your government entitlements.
I'm not an expert but these would the sorts of enquiries I would be making.  Show him this post, be very clear you're all for him protecting his funds, but let him know that his current behaviour is damaging to your relationship, not to mention detrimental to your child.


This.


Also if he thinks he is protecting his assets from a relationship breakdown by having them in a term deposit he is completely wrong.

Are you responsible for paying the bills at the moment? Maybe hand that over to him so that he has to start thinking about the future and taking some responsibility.

It seems like he has formed his opinions without really knowing what he is talking about.

#22 Koobie83

Posted 28 November 2012 - 08:15 AM

We rent and are doing reasonably well. What we don't pay on a mortgage we save into a nest egg account. We aren't planning on buying a house in the near future either. We would rather save our money now and buy when we can definitely afford it (i.e if either of us lost our job we could still afford the mortgage and live at the same time). In fact next year my husband is planning on taking long term leave and finishing his uni course. We could never have done this if we had a mortgage and no money in the bank earning interest.
Don't panic. There's a lot of babies being born in the world to people who probably have less than you do.

#23 RellBell

Posted 28 November 2012 - 08:23 AM

QUOTE (Team Awesome @ 28/11/2012, 08:02 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Gather all your bills and go through them with your partner and make up a sensible budget. Toiletries are necessary but find ways to cut back on these ie spending $50 on shampoo and conditioner is not necessary. you don't need the most expensive brand toilet paper and other things.

Mobile phones don't need to be on expensive plans or even on plans so you can upgrade look at alternatives. check out your other bills to make sure currently getting the best deal on electricity etc.

If you haven't already start including things for baby in your weekly shop like nappies and wipes. I've used cheap nappies and wipes from soon after birth for the last 8.5 years and four children kids don't need huggies and bonds stuff they don't know the difference.

Other ways you can cut back you could try making your own laundry liquid, I do this have done for almost a year but we all had gastro last month and ran out whilst Iw as sick so but will go back to it when we run out (DH bought a huge container of biozet knowing it's what I prefer) You can use vinegar for the fabric softener (I add a few drops of essential oil in it)

I've been doing no shampoo for the last 6 months. My kids don't get designer clothes even when we have a larger  income.

Babies need a loving family to come into so get the money side sorted out now so you can be already to focus on the joy of your baby coming.

Once you've worked out where you can cut back give centrelink a call and have a chat to them.

Good luck.


Thanks.

This made me think back to being kids - mum and dad had 5 kids on his labourers wage, their mortgage was only $100 a week and they received centrelink benefits - but they really had to scrimp to make ends meet. We drank powdered milk (only once a month would we get real milk and it was the biggest treat!), we never ate out for lunch (I had maccas maybe twice in my childhood), and our "shopping spree" for new clothes for us and mum was when vinnies had a bag sale.

Mum and dad grew vegies in the back yard too, so we ate a LOT of silverbeet (it seemed to grow all year around).

But we had a childhood rich with experience, and with family, I am beginning to see the light original.gif

#24 Bam1

Posted 28 November 2012 - 08:26 AM

The BB or PPL will get you through the initial period which is also topped up by FTB, then there is daycare so you can help support your family and relieve the financial stress.


#25 B.Nasty

Posted 28 November 2012 - 08:30 AM

QUOTE (item @ 28/11/2012, 07:18 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
He sounds like a tool.

Actually he sounds like a bloke who is doing his best to keep that money seperate from your relationship so you will not ever have a claim on it. Made toolish by refusing to discuss it and the fact you are about to have a child together.


My thoughts exactly.





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